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MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 



VOLUME V ISSUE 1 WEDNEDAY MAY 31, 1978 




SUMlini Nivis|».i|ifi III 111. I Miv.i.,1^ ,1 M.i^K.M M ,.,, IIS \mhi isi mn mm h i i 141 t, .». ,-.,«, 



From the ivy-covered halls of Cornell 



/ 




. . .to the concrete buildings of UMass 

Inside: 

A talk with the new president 



Colle gian. 



Wednesuay , Mdy3), 1978 



By LAURA KENNEY 

ITHACA, NY Newly selected UMass 
president David C. Knapp has "no 
preconceptions about UMass students I 
like to see what things are before I make 
any judgments." 

Knapp, current Cornell University provost, 
sal comfortably on a couch in his office in ari 
interview last week, smoking incessantly, 
his blue eyes darting beneath scores of 
deep wrinkles. 

He responded to many questions by say- 
ing he did not as yet know much about 
UMass or about many issues confronting 
the University, and that he would "just 
have to wait until I get there." 

Knapp, 50, was elected earlier this month 
by a majority vote of the UMass Board of 
Trustees. He was one of five finalists for 
the position which was vacated when 
Robert C Wood resigned as president ef- 
fective Jan 1 Included among the finalists 
was UMass Amherst Chancellor Randolph • 
W Bromery. Franklin K. Patterson, 
founder of Hampshire CoUege, has been in- 
tenm University president since Wood's 
resignation. 

Massachusetts has been the seat of 
some of the greatest institutions of private 
learning in the country for years; it also 
deserves a great public institution," Knapp 
said "I believe the two sectors can live side 
by side in peace and comfort very well " 



Cornell is an Ivy League university here in 
upstate New York which derives two thirds 
of Its funding from pnvate sources, such as 
tuit on and fees, alumni gifts and en- 
dowments One third of the school's fun 
.ling comes from public sources, such as 
federal research grants and tuition from in 
state students. Three of the university's 
seven undergraduate colleges are publicly 
fur>ded 



I deal here with both public and pnvate 
sectors which have mutual respect within 
the same university, ' Knapp said "The 
Commonwealth should have the same rela- 
tionship l)etween the two sectors " 

Office in Boston 

The presidential offices and the main of- 
fices for the tri-campus University system 
are currently located at newly renovated 
100 Arlington Street in Boston. The three 
campuses enroll about 35,000 students, 
23.000 of whom attend the Amhest cam 
pus 

"There are both pluses and minuses to the 
president's office being located in Boston," 
said Knapp. "There's a problem with the 
president of a system not living on a cam- 
pus; I'll miss faculty and students. I must 
find a way to deal with that. But the seat of 
power is in Boston." 

"The president is more detached fronrieach 
single campus,'" he said. "He 
therefore should be able to keep them (the 
campuses) in perspective." Knapp said he 
intends to visit Amherst for a couple of 
days within the next month. "UMass- 
Amherst is the oldest, largest part of the 
University system; there's a lot of academic 
activity out there. I don't intend to forget 
it," he said. 

Knapp exjaressed concern for the future of 
UMass Boston. "I think there's an op- 
portunity there for an interesting and im- 
portant academic unit; there's some uncer- 
tainty as to precisely what its role is," he 
said. "It will be an urgent item on my agen- 
da." 

Top spot vacancies 

Knapp said he is "worried" about the 
amount of vacancies at top levels within 
the University system. "We must have con- 
tinuity as well as chanpe," he said. 

Among the vacant positions are the 
Boston campus chancellorship, and the 
positions of provost and vice chancellor for 
student affairs at the Amherst campus, all 
of which arecurrently filled by acting ad- 
ministrators. In addition, Amherst campus 
Chancellor • Randolph W. Bromery last 
month announced his resignation effective 
June 1979, and Vice Chancellor for Ad 
ministration and Finance James L. McBee 
last week announced his resignation. 

Knapp said he is against faculty unioniza- 
tion, which he terms as "a symptom that 
something is not well within an institution. 



ew face for UM 



Cornell University Provost 
David C. Knapp will come 



to UMass this fall 



to become the 



University s 18th president 




Unionization is "a syn^om that 
somettMng is not well vwtthin an in- 
stitution... The board, tf>e faculty 
and the administration should 
work out things together rather 
than having an adversarial reiatiorv 
ship." 



"I deal here v»«th both public and 
privaie sectors vUiich have rrnitual 
respect \Mthin the same university. 
The Commonweatth should have 
the same relatiorrahip betvween the 
two sectors." 




"UMass- Amherst is the oldest, 
largest part of the University 
system: there's a lot of acadenic 
activity out tf>ere. I don't intend to 
forget it." 



"There's a problem vwHh the presi- 
dent of a system not living on a 
campus; I'll miss faculty and 
students. I must find a wey to deal 
with that." 

pholo^ by Bill Sundsirom 



J 



There should be a collegial relationship in 
an instituion no we'sand they's; unionize 
tion leads to that situation The board, the 
faculty and the administration should work- 
out things together rather than having an 
adversarial relationship. ' 

The UMass faculty unionized last year and 
is currently negotiating with the administra- 
tion for its first contract. The faculty 
members are asking for a salary increase, 
which they have not received for four 
years Seve'al breakdowns have occurred 
in negotiations since their start last fall, but 
Patterson last week said an agreement 
could be reached soon. 

Competitive salaries needed 

"I think the faculty members should be 
able to have a salary commensurate to their 
contribution to society; the academic pro- 
fession has not been rewarded for a couple 
of decades. " Knapp said "This is easier 
said than done, for at this time there is 
economic chaos. But I don t know how to 
maintain a good comp)etitive university 
unless you pay competitive salaried." 

Commenting on the faculty's recent deci- 
sion to withhold underclass students' 
grades this semester, Knapp said, "I don't 
think it IS a practice very fair to students or 
to anyone They (the professors) are taking 
out some grievances in a direction which I 
don't like.'" 

Knapp said he t>elieves in tenure "as a 
safeguard for academic freedom; it's im- 
portant in determining long ran^ quality 
"Before tenure is granted, there should be 
a review process." 

He does not believe in students tjeing in- 
volved in the collective bargaining process. 
■ I dont see why, " he said, "the way the 
process works, there is a representative of 
the faculty and a representative of the 
University; I don't know any other institu- 
tion which has students in collective 
bargaining " 

Favors students in planning 

However, Knapp said he is in favor of 
students' involvement in long range plan 
ning because "students can bring impor- 
tant perspectives to long rgnge issues. 
Students tend to have short-range perspec- 
tives, though. They have their own im 
mediate interests in mind. In planning for 
the university, we (the administration) try 
to see the university for a longer penod of 
time; we have a main stake in long-range 
planning." 

Knapp said he believes that distribution re- 
quirements are important to college educa- 
tion. '"A student receiving a university 
education should have broad exposure to 
fields of knowledge, " he said. "Distribution 
requirements should take into account the 
different interests of students in different 
fields of study; there should be access to 
different kinds of courses." 

"Evaluations must be raeponaible" 

He said course evaluations are "imp>ortant 
as a tool for individual instructors to learn 
from. I don't think I would be enthusiastic 
as an instructor to have them passed out. 
You must be damned responsible when 
you fill them out if they are to be made 
public." 

There is a current controversy on campus 
surrounding the rights of students to gain 
access to all course and teacher evaluations 
to be compiled in a handbook. 

Regarding speculation on former UMass 
President Wood's intention to run for US 
senator, Knapp said, "If that's what he 
wants to do, then more power to him." He 
quickly added, "I have no political aspira- 
tions at all." 

Knapp is expecting to assume his 
presidential role in the fall. "I plan to have a 
good vacation this summer with my family; 
I've been in a high-pressure job here for 
four years and I'm moving to another. I 
need a vacation." 

He is a 1947 graduate of Syracuse Univer- 
sity, and received both his master's and 
doctoral degrees in political science at the 
University of Chicago. 

Knapp taught at the University of New 
Hampshire froni 1953 to 1961 before 
becoming "dean of the College of Liberal 
Arts He left UNH in 1963 to work with the 
American Council of Education before 
assuming his first administrative position at 
Cornell in 1968. He became acting provost 
in 1972, and took over the full-time position 
in 1974. 



Colle gian, 



r 



Wednesday, May 3 1 107;, 



Wedn(jb.day, May 31, 1978 



Commencement '78 




photos by 


Dave Rodgers 


and 


Laura Kenney 



I 




It took a while, but the sun finally 
broke through the ctouds, shtmng 
down on 5,200 gleeful degree can 
didates. 17.000 proud spectators, 
and assorted others at last Satur- 
day's one hundred and eighth 
UMass Amherst commencement en 
cercises. 

Obviously, many graduates felt 
that the traditional cap and gown 
garb of graduations didn't say all 
they wanted to say (above, left and 
right) 

CBS news correspondent and 
host of the popular program "Sixty 
Minutes' Mike Wallace was awarded 
with an honorary doctorate (above, 
middle* Wallace also delivered the 
commencement address 

Two graduates combined to give 
a mortar board salute to their class 
(right I. 




I Racquets by: 




377 Main St. 



Bancroft Spalding 
Dunlop Wilson 

Davis 

Restringing Cr Regripping 

The best is at 

FENTONS 

Athletic Supplies 

Amherst 
253-3973 




Disputes continue 



■Colle gian 3 



Profswithhold grades 



ByMARKLECCeSE 

Two hundred professors have already 
withheld grades from the administration in 
protest of the ongoing faculty contract 
talks between the administration and the 
Massachusetts Society of Professors, ac- 
cording to Lynne Seymour, a member of 
the MSP staff. 

The MSP, which is the union representing 
faculty members on the UMass-Amherst 
campus, have charged that the administra- 
tion is delaying negotiations and not 
bargaining in good faith. 



Seymour said she expects between 200 
and 250 faculty members will withhold 
students' grades from last semester. The 
grades were supposed to be turned into the 
registrar's office last Friday afternoon, ac 
cording to University Registrar Ralph D. 
Jones. 

The MSP will turn in specific grades if re- 
quested by students, however, and will 
also turn in to the registrar grades that are 
necessary to students. These include 
grades for seniors, financial aid students, 
veterans, transfer students and students 
going abroad next semester, according to 



Alvin E. Winder, 
MSP. 



vice-president of the 



90 faculty m em b ers 
protest at graduation 



ByMARKLECCESE 

About 90 faculty members walked out 
ori last Saturday's commencement exer- 
cises in Alumnni Stadium protesting what 
the Massachusetts Society of Professors 
called the administration's "delay and lack 
of good faith " in on going contract 
negotiations 

The faculty members, dressed in the 
ceremonial capS and gowns, walked down 
the center aisle after the ceremony's in- 
vocation was delivered and were applauded 
by many of the graduates.. 

Some faculty memberts held picket 
signs and handed out flyers stating the 
MSP's position outside the stadium before 
the commencement began. 

Members of the MSP, who formed a 
union on this campus last year, will also be 
withholding this past semester's non- 
essential grades from the administration. 
(See related story on this page). 

"When the negotiations begin to flow 
and the administration comes to its senses, 
we will turn in our grades," Larry S. 
Roberts, a member of the negotiating 
team, said last Saturday. 

Umass Interim President Franklin K. 
Patterson, had planned to deliver a speech 
on the contract negotiations, but made on- 
ly a few remarks on the situation, saying. 
One thing I hope the faculty knows is that 
the trustees believe in the faculty as well as 
believing in the students, and we are work 
ing towards the welfare of both these 
groups " 

WaNace Delivers Address 

The commencement address was 
delivered by Mike Wallace, television news 
correspondent for the Columbia Broad 
casting System and host of the program 
Sixty Minutes. " Wallace, a native of 
Brookline, aslo received an honorary doc 

torate . . 

Wallace said he felt a "special hap- 
piness and a special pride. To be honored 
t)y the University in my home state is 
especially satisfying . " 

Discussing the restrictions put on him 
by the campus administration at the 
University of Michigan when he was a stu 
dent there in the late 1930s, he said, "It was 
not a very permissive time." But in com- 



parison, Wallace said, "square as it may 
sound, it my have been a better time for all 
of us ".After saying this, Wallace received 
applause from the spectators in the stands. 

"As you notice..' he said, ""most of the 
applause came from the taxpayers in the 
stands" 

Amherst campus chancellor Randolph 
W. Bromery, who has been chancellor here 
for seven years, told the graduates that this 
might be h's last commencement at 
UMass. Bromery announced his resigna 
tion in March to put himself in the running 
for the Umass presidency, vacated by 
Robert C Wood in January. Bromery did 
not get the position. 

In addition to Wallace, other honorary 
doctorates were awarded to;James 
Baldwin, award winning author and civil 
rights activist; W. Arthur Garnty, the U.S. 
Distrct judge for Massachusetts who 
ordered the Boston school system 
desegregated in 1974 and who has been 
presiding over the desegregation process; 
Dr. E. Margaret Burbidge, president of the 
American Astronomical Society; Dr. Lewis 
Hanke. the ^rst Latin American historian to 
be named president of the American 
Historical Society and a former UMass 
Amherst professor; and Joseph B 
Flavin, executive officer and chairman of 
the Singer Sewing Machine Companyand a 
1953 graduate of Xfw UMass Amherst 
School of Business Administration 

"It was a happy day out there," Wallace 
said after the commencement, "men and 
women were honored who deserve those 
degrees with the possible exception of 
me." ^ ^^ 



Approximately 52 percent of the students 
at UMass receive some kind of fir^ncial 
aid. according to Arthur R. Jackson, 
Associate Director of Financial Aid. 

Jones yesterday said the MSP "obviously 
is not turning those grades in." Jones said 
he had just begun to go through the grade 
rosters that were turned in Friday yesterday 
nrK)rning, and about 100 had only grades for 
seniors. 

"The problem is that financial aid students 
are not identified on the grade rosters," 
said Seymour. "We asked all the pro- 
fessors to ask students to identify 
themselves if they neded grades, but not all 
the faculty did that, and not all the students 
responded. Granted, we may have missed 
some." 

Report cards for this past semester will 
show a blank space where professors did 
not turn in students' grades, according to 
Jones. A blank will count as a failing grade 
since all of a student's credits are added up 
and divided by the total quality points, 
which is the p>oint values for each course 
grade multiplied by the number of semester 
hours of credit in the respective courses, he 
said. 

Winder said the MSP will do "direct 
grading," mailing grades on post cards to 
any students who requested grades from 
their professors. "The idea is to make it 
very difficult for the administration to feed 
the grades into the computers; therefore, 
planning will be held up. We are trying to 
make the point that negotiations are 
necessary for the University to continue." 

Winder also said the MSP would turn in 
the grades when a faculty contract is 
agreed upon. "That would be our ferverent 
wish and hope." he said 

Student grades are being turned in to the 
MSP office in the Graduate Research 
Center, and from there are being stored in a 
safety deposit box at the First National 
Bank of Amherst, according to Seymour. 

In a flyer handed out to spectators and 
students at last Saturday "s commencement 
exercises, the MSP charged the administra- 
tion with continually and arbitrarily 
allocating "resources and personnel 
without faculty and-or student discussion 
and advice," and raising costs "While the 
facilities of the University deteriorate in 
both physical and health safety." 



MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 



Co pditDf 

LAURA M KENNEY 
Co editor 

MARK A LECCESE 
Hiisinoss Manayt-'f 

LAURIE A WOOD 
Gr.iphif's Mrinager 

BARBARAS LAMKIN 



SUBSCRIPTIONS 



"N 



On camput and oM cafn|M<i 



$2 60 Summm 



Mail cl«'liveiv \u U»Mve'»ily c*«T>piis and Am»>ef»« •»•• Mme 
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flpt.v«v following day Outwrte ol Massachosemallow 2 o< 3 days 
(W.K-'v S»'n<l clwc k o« monry oidc' to llw MMl«ehM»«n» Sun. 
me» Collaqnn Room 113 C.i'"uus Ceote' Uni*«fsiiv ot 
M«>s,» K.ispiis AnihwM MasMclHJsms 01003 PIMM aflow 1 
wi'.'V lof (litlivefy to sMrt 

TtH- oltice ol mp MaaaachuMm Sunvnar Coligian >•> located 
■ Rimm 113ol|hpMutfa* D Lin< oin Campus Cpmiw on thp U™ve» 
• , >l Massaclius»»lls i ampus Telcpho'M' S46 3W0 

The iraiirr- Suowmf Colagan 'S actepted lor mail 

."<) cmdpf ihp aiiihoiiiy (if .tn a* t ol Cooqrpss Marth 8 1879 and » 
rtmpjKted June 1 1 1943 

Sr>< :ftnd class |Mistat(e is pard in Amhe'sl MasssaclHisefli 01003 
'I • Massachusetts Surrwner Collegian putilishps pv«"y Wpr|"f<. 

Ii. Ml, r "I'H'i' ,;>il' . "«,,),■,' 'h 19Win. lusiy"' 



McBee 
quits 



By LAURA KENNEY 

UMass Vice-chancellor for Ad- 
ministration and Finance Jarr>es L. 
McBee, Jr. last week announced his 
resignation, effective in August. 

McBee took the post last July 
after it had been vacant for several 
years. He said earlier this week he is 
leaving for a "better job " and said he 
was "not particularly looking around 
for another position, but the op- 
portunity came up and I couldn't af- 
ford to turn It down." 
McBee will become the executive 
dean at Potomac State College in 
Keyser, West Virginia, which is part 
of West Virginia University, and has 
a student body of about 1 ,000. The 
position of executive dean is similar 
to that of college president. 

He said he does not yet know 
at>out a replacement for the position. 

McBee's resignation adds to the 
high number of vacant positions in 
University administrative top spots. 
The other two campus vice 
chancellorships are also vacant In 
addition, Amherst campus 
Chancellor Randolph W. Bromery 
has resigned effective June 1979. 

As head of administration and 
finance. McBee is in charge of the 
Physical Plant on campus, transpor- 
tation and parking, the dining com 
mons, the Campus Center payroll 
and accounting, labor relations, the 
office of grants and contracts, and 
business and financial management 
procedures 

After earning his doctoral degree 
at West Virginia University in 1969. 
McBee joined the staff as an assis 
tant professor. He was then selected 
to head the animal science program 
at Illinois State University in 1970 

Prior to becoming one of three 
vice chancellors on campus. McBee 
was an executive office to the presi 
dent at lllinios State. 




James L. McBee 



^ LIQIORS 

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4 Colle gian. 

Summer 
Sports 

In order to use any of the facilities listed 
below or to participate in any intramural 
sport, you n usl show a summer recrea 
tional sticker. Procedures for obtaining a 
summer recreational sticker are as follows 

Undergraduates: Pay $5 fee at the Bur 
sar s office in Whitmore. This is good for 
only one summer session first session is 
May 30 to July 11. Second session is July 
12 to August 22 Cost for both sessuns is 
$10 Take receipt to the Boyden ti n n of 
fite to receive your summer sticker 
Graduate, faculty, staff Purchase sum 
mer sticker for $10 at the Boyden ticket of 
fice This sticker is good from May 30 to 
August 22 

Guests of UI\Aass personnel: Purchase 
guest pass for $1 per day at Boyden ticket 
office UMass personnel valid I D with 
summer sticker 

The Boyden ticket office is located 
in Room 255. Boyden Its hours are 8 to 
12 a m. and 12: 30 to 3 pm. 

The recreational summer sticker fee en 
titles you to Locker, lock, basket, towel 
exchange, shower facilities shorts, socks, 
jocks, t shirts, use of a> recreational 
facilities, and participation in formal 
leagues and tournaments 



Racraatfonal facilrties (Open Playl 

BOYDEN GYM IVtonday Fnday. 3 7 30 
p m (closed June 23) 

Boyden POOL Monday Friday. 12 
p m 

(lap! 3 30 7 30 pm (openKmust provide 
own swimsuit. cutoffs pro- 

hibited) 

NOPE POOL Monday Fnday. 1112 
p. m ( Handicapped! 

BOYDEN WEIGHT ROOM Monday 
Fnday 11 7 30 p m (Buddy system! * 

BOYDEN HANDBALL COURTS 
Mondav Fnday. 

8 7 30 pm (Reserve court in person 

at Boyden) 

BOYDEN BOWLING ALLEYS Monday 
Friday. 12 4 p m (50c per day. shoes 
provided after July 1 1 

TENNIS COURTS 

Lower Boyden AN week. 9 7 pm. 
Upper Boyden Monday Thursday. 

17 p m . Fpday Sur>day. 9 7 p.m. 
NO PE Monday Thursday. 11 7 

p m.. Friday Sunday. 9 7 p.m. 



Wednesday, May 31, 1978 



Wednesday, May 31, 1978 




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th.it you use everyday Such as peanut butter, 
mayor^'^aise sparjhetti leUies and preserves 



Economy is basic cjoo(j. serviceable guality. 
such as household [jroducts. p.iper towels, 
tissue^s ,ind plastic bags 

The value-(.hoir:e is yours natiorial brands, our 
Stop& Shop or Sun Glory Brands, or our new 
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are not completely satisfied for any reason, we' II 
c;ive you your money hark 




loiiegiaas 



Grad 

towers 

reopen 

ByMARKLECCESE 

The Graduate Research Towers, close* 
for seven days due to suspected health 
hazards, were reopened last Friday morn- 
ing after the man who had ordered the 
building closed said, We felt it was ab- 
solutely safe to reopen the labs." 

The labs were closed on Friday, May 19, 
by Seymour Shapiro, dean of Natural 
Sciences and Mathematics, after test 
results from a private lab indicated tha« 
there were high levels of toluene, a com 
mon lab solvent, found in the blood and 
unne of several women who worked on the 
ninth floor of the towers and who had com- 
plained of prolonged menstrual bleeding. 

Shapiro said Friday there was a "very thin 
strand which now connects toluene, or any 
other organic ccnipound in general, and 
these symptoms." Tests run on the same 
samples by a state lab showed no traces of 
hippuric, the compound that toluene is 
converted into in the human body. The 
state lab tests, according to Shapiro, in- 
dicated that "everyone tested was nor 
mal ' ' 

The building was closed after the first set 
of tests, according to Shapiro, "to be safe 
Under normal circumstances, one woulc 
not act until there was a repeat test Bu, 
because of the general apprehension and 
because so many showed these higher 
levels, we decided to close the buildmy un 
til further confirmation " 

The UMass Division of Environmental 
Health and Safety ran checks on all the 
equipment in the labs, and repaired several 
emergency floor drains. Donald A Robin 
son. director of the Division of Environmen 
tal Health and Safety, said they would con 
tinue physical and biological monitoring of 
the labs in the building. 
"From an environmental health perspec- 
tive, the building has been through a 
thorough evaluation and we can find no 
contaminants." said Robinson. 
Shapiro said evaluators still don't know 
what might have caused the symptoms of 
prolonged menstrual bleeding in the 
women and general discomfort in the men. 
"There is still a possibility that it is an 
organic solvent we haven't tested for and 
if you start testing all the organic solvents 
in the labs, itsan enormous task. " 
A telephone survey run by a consulting 
epidemologist of over 300 workers in the 
towers is underway, according to Shapiro, 
to determine "how many, what and where 
the causes of these symptoms could be." 
Shapiro said all of the data should be col- 
lected by this Friday. 

Officials at the Division of Environnriental 
Health and Safety first learned about the 
problem on Thursday, May 11, when a 
group of women, all workers on the ninth 
floor, reported their symptoms to Shapiro. 
They were, in addition to some men, given 
a battery of tests at the University Health 
Center, to learn if there were any effects of 
toluene that could be found in the body 
physiology The Health Center reported 
that all who were tested had no problems. 
Shapiro said there were some "oddities" 
in the private lab tests that reported high 
levels of toluene in the systems of the 
workers The tests often reported highei 
levels of toluene in the blood than was in 
the urine of the workers, which is unusual, 
according to Shapiro. "People are continu- 
ing to look into this, " he saio. 



AMHERST CYCLE SHOP 

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••»! ts .lAi'r^iSi-fl H>t*vmls It 4- V 



"N i»»<y;tiil 




Collegian, 



Wednesday, May 31, 1978 



Pro fessio nal g ro up 
opens season in July 



»V DEBBIE SCHAPER 

Professional theatre is coming to campus 
>nce again this summer, as the Com 
Twnweatth Stage opens its 1978 season in 
the Rand Theatre of the Fine Arts Center 
La«t summer the Commonwealtf^ Stage 
>p«ned Its doors with three professional 
oroductions over a six week period. This 
iOSf the season has been expanded into 
two parts: a summer season of tour new 
Olays beginning July 7, and a fall season of 
five plays beginning in September and run 
<ing through December 
The summer portion of the Com- 
tnonwealth Stage's season is bang called 
rheacre InTheWoilu and will feature four 



this years season "It was an absolute shot 
in the dark We didn't know if there was an 
audience, and we didn't know if it was 
possible to do on the limited number of 
dollars we had to use but we had an 
awfully good track record for that first 
year 

The first season left the Commonwealth 
Stage with an unspecified but 'excep 
tionally modest' debt, according to Knauf. 
"The dollars were not great from that ef 
fort, and we didn't expect them to be for 
that first year, but the support was terrific 
Everyone connected with it was enormous 
ly pleased with the results ' ' 

A UMass News Bureau spokesperson call 
ed last year s season a success. They did 



Th 



anginal "scripts by contemporary American 
■••-rwrights The plays will be produced in 
*forkshop format by a company of profes- 
Jional actors, directors ar>d designers 
2>avid Kriauf, executive producer and 
tjunder of the Commonwealth Stage, said 
he specific plays and playwrights will be 
mnounced within the next week. 
The four plays will t)e produced over a 
*Our week period. July 7 30 One of the 
our plays from the summer will be produc 
»d in the fall season, giving audiences the 
unique experience of seeing the growth 
and development of a new work of 
theatrical art, Knauf said. 
That re tn Th> Worta is "most cntical and 
•nportant to the American theatre scene," 
Krwuf stressed With the lack of pressure 
from big Broadway investors, regional pro 
fessional theatres such as the Com 
onweaith Stage, once considered Broad 
way's stepchildren, are now bringing 
tf>eatre to Broadway It is increasingly ap 
parent that the new playwrights are finding 
a voice in the regional theatre" 

"When regional audiences attend a world 
Drerrwer at their own tfieatre." he said, 
they know that they are not witnessing a 
p<ay that just wasn't quite good enough for 
Broadway " He cited Vanities," "Man of 
La Mancha, 1776,' and the Pulit/er Pri/e 
winning "Shadow Box " as examples of this 
trend 
The fall season will open with Edward 
Albee s "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" 
from Sept 1 through Sept 23 G Bernard 
Shaw's "Misalliance" will run from Sept 
29 to Oct 21, and the world premiere selec 
tion from Theatre In The Workywill be pro 
duced from Oct 3 to Oct 22 
On Oct 27 Peter Shaffers Equus " will 
open, which wiM be the first time that this 
award-winning drama will be performed by 
a professional regional theatre group J M 
Barne's "Peter Pan' will round out the 
season from Dec 1 to Dec. 23, including 
special matinees for children 

Knauf said he is "terrifically happy " with 

the community response to last year's 

premier season, and that the response has 

"encouraged us to continue" with plans for 



remarkably well considering that it was the 
Commonwealth Stage's first year and they 
had a lot of limitations placed on them 

The Commonwealth Stage should do 
well this season,' he said because UMass 
IS achieving a reputation as a year rourj 
University, instead of just a 9 month 
school That sort of reputation just didn't 
exist a couple of years ago ' ' 
Season tickets for Thaatra In Tha Worls 
and the fall productions of the Com 
monwealth Stage are new available at the 
Rand Theatre Box o»fice or by calling the 
bo* office Reduced rates are available to 
UMass students & senior citizens 



Tights and Leotards 



X 



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Collegian : 



Swans return 




s 1 



B^f BARBARA CALL AN AN 
arid LAURA KENNEY 

That finalsign of spring has arriv- 
ed' Yes, you guessed it, the swans 
are back 

Since these migratory birds cannot 
handle the brutal New England 
winter with which we are ali so 
familiar, they reside in the Campus 
Pond only from May to 
November The remaining five mon 
ths of the year the swans are kept in 
a penned-in area at Tillson Farm 
behind Orchard Hill 

The birds are taken to the farm, ac- 
cording to University Landscape Ar 
chitect William A Lambert, to pro 
tect them against attacks by dogs 
coming across the ice. He also said 
the swans must constantly have their 
legs in water, or e4se a circulation 
problem can develop anO the 
creatures can die. "We must send a 
Physical Plant crewman up to the 
farm every once in a while during the 
winter to chop holes m the ice for the 
swans." 

SorT»e of us may remember with 
humor (he frustrating experience the 
Physical Plant crew encountered 
when trying to catch the birds last 
fall. With the aid of a motorboat and 
a net. it took close to ten hours 
before the swans tired, enabling 



themselves to be caught. 

The swans were a donation from 
the Rhode Island Wildlife Sanctuary 
about ten years ago According to 
Lamt)ert, there was once a family of 
birds m the por>d along with some 
others, but "the father of the family 
beat up the other swans, territorial 
nghts took over The other swans 
were evacuated ' ' 

Currently there are two male swans 
in the pond. 

Surprisingly erxiugh. they were not 
brought to campus solely for the pur 
pose of inspiring UMass scholars 
They are actually more important in 
helping to keep the pond from 
becoming overrun with weeds. The 
idea was originated by Professor 
Gordon King of the Plant and Soil 
Department. 

He brought it to the attention of 
University planners that swans feed 
on the roots of the water plants that 
grow along the edge of the pono. In 
this way they control overgrowth. 
Although the birds wings are clip- 
ped to prevent them from flying 
away, they have been known to take 
occasional walking tours of Amherst. 
Lambert said, "About six years ago, 
some of the swans decided to leave 
the pond and take a walk down 
North Pleasant Street to Town Hall. 
Maybe they were demonstrating'" 



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S84.6813 



12 c:c)lle ^iuni 



^Wednesday, June 7, 1978 




The Boston Dance Collective, a profes- 
sional company of contemporary dancers 
and choreoqraphers, will perform tonight at 
8pm in Bowker Auditorium. 

Each artist in the colluctive creates ard 
j>ef forms his own work <; Pieces to be danc 
ed art; 

"R. ■ At. i Hdg," "Shutter, ' 



"Brandenberg #3," "Home A^j ..n Blues," 
"Tangent Watchers," and "Flying Leap of 
the Flea " 

Admission to the Dance Collective Per- 
formance will be free for Arts Hos»"l pur 
ticipants, 50 cents for summer students 
with valid ID, $1 for children and senior 
citizens, and $2 for the general public 



Sum m er Activities 



films 



June 13: Xala, CCA, 7 30 b 10 00 

June 20 Le Merveilleuse Vishe, CCA, 

7:30 & 9:45 
June 27 EmanuellelThe Joys of a 

Woman), CCA, 7 30 B 9. 15 
July 5 One Eyed Jacks, CCA, 7:30 b 

10:00 
July 1 1 : Mahogany, CCA, 7:30 & 9:30 
July 18 Princess Yang Kwei Fei, 

Thompson 104, 7 30 & 9 15 
July 25: Bugsy IVlalone. CCA, 7:30^9:15 



August 1 : Shorts 

Never Give Up. 

104, 7:30 & 9:45 
August 8: Citizen Kane, CCA, 7 
August 15: King Of Hearts, 

104,7:30 8 9:30 



(Red Balloon, Don't, 
Katatura) Thompson 



30 8 9:45 
Thompson 



Admission to all films is free. CCA stands 
for Campus Center Auditorium, which is 
located on the first floor of the Campus 
Center. 



performances 



June 7: Dance Collective, Bowker Aud , 8 

p.m. 
June 14: Rana, the electronic music of 

Randall McClellan, CCA, 8p.m. 
June 21: Boston Arts Group, CCA, 8 p.m. 
June 28: Impulse Dance Company, Bowker 

Aud , 8p.m. 
July 12: Boston Arts Group, Bowker Aud., 

8 p.m. 
July 19: Boston Pocket Mime Theater, 

Bowker Aud., 8p.(Vi. 
July 26: Drumsong, CCA, 8 p.m. 
August 2; Rosenhontz, CCA, 8 p.m. 
August 9: If Every Fool, CCA, 8 p.m. 
August 16: Pioneer Valley Folklore Society, 

place to be announced, 8 p.m. 




Wednesday, June?, 1978 



Will vote on ho us in g 



•SMsgiao 



Trustees to exempt juniors 



"B^ LAURA KENNEY 

The UMass Board of Trustees today will 
pass a motion to end mandatory on- 
campus housi'ig for juniors, according to 
Student Trustee Robert Dion. 

The trustees will also discuss during their 
monthly meeting on the UMass Boston 
campus the further goals of thct campus 
and will discuss appointing a search com- 
mittee to find a replacement for Amherst 
campus Chancellor Randolph W. Bromery, 
who has said he will resign effective next 
June 

The board will go into executive session 
after the open meeting to hear a report 
from the ad hoc committee (or labor rela- 





/ 



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W/ 



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Student Trustee Robert Dion 

tions, discussing current faculty 
administration contract negotiations. 

Dion said the administration originally pro- 
posed the idea of housing exemption for 
juniors, and that "they brought it up to the 
trustees about five years ago, but they 
didn't do their homework, so the trustees 
shot It down." Presently, only seniors, 
veterans and married students are 
automatically exempted from mandatory 
housing. 

"They (the administration) feel that by 
making the dorms a voluntary place to live 
it will cut down vandalism and the cost of 
repairs will decrease," Dion said. "The ex 
emption will improve the environment, and 
will attract more transfer students." 

Two trustee committees have thus far 
been handling the proposal, which was 
drawn up by Acting Vice chancellor for 
Student Affairs Robert L. Woodbury, 
former Student Government Association" 
Co president Miirion L Batiste, and Stu 
dent Senator Danirl Salse The Student Af 
fairs Committee passed the pioposal a\ 
their May 23 meeting, and the Budget and 
Finance Committee passed it May 2A. 

Included'in the proposal is the motion for 
the ending of the mandatory subscription 
to the meal plan for juniors "This is the 
biggest hole we have," said Dion. "A lot of 
people are going to be using hot plates in 



their rooms, which is 
policy because they are 
also said the increased 
dorm rooms may cause 
cording to Dion, "they 
going to leave the way 
rescind the vote on the d 



against University 
a fire hazard." He 
amount of food in 
more insects. Ac- 
(the trustees) are 
open so they can 
ining commons " 



Dion said the vote to end the housing re- 
quirement for juniors is not in anticipation 
of housing problems which may occur this 
fall as a result of more students 
matriculating than expected. Last fall 400 
students entered without housing 
assignments, and many stayed in the Cam 
pus Center Hotel, sororities and frater 
nities, and dormitory lounges. By the end 
of the semester, most of the problems were 
ironed out 

J uniors and sophomore males wereallowed 
to move off campus last fall as a temporary 



measure to alleviate the space prob 
lem. 

According to a spokesman in the Admis 
sions Office, 3,821 freshmen have definitely 
decided to attend UMass, as opposed to 
3,748 at the same time last year He said a 
little over 4,000 freshmen actually entered 
last fall 

Housing Assignment Coordinator Gerald 
A Quarles said he and his staff have been 
restructuring the system in an attempt to 
avoid another housing conflict similar to 
the one which occurred last fall, but that 
"we won't know what will happen until our 
ideas are actually implemented We are 
preparing for the worst, but hoping for the 
best " 

Quarles said that if the proposal is passed 
to exempt juniors from housing, there will 
be a question as to whether ;he off campus 
housing market can absorb the number of 



students who would conceivably be look 
ing for apartments and homes. He said a 
survey of off campus housing options is 
being taken by a staff member at the 
Residential Resource Management office 

Among changes in the housing system ac 
corrling to Quarles are a switch from ran 
dnm assignment in co educational living 
environments to assigning rooms with a 
ratio of 60 percent male to 40 percent 
female Enrollment he said is usually 55 per 
cent male to 45 percent female Quarles 
said a list of eligible candidates for off 
campus housing is being generated and 
letters will be sent^out to those students in 
quiring about their fall plans If replies are 
not received before the start of the 
semester, he said those students will lose 
their dorm assignments. 

"We're doing everything we can to try to 
prevent students from being burned in the 
system, ■ tie said 



Stud en t Activities Tax Fun d s 
may face $180,000 deficit 



Bv MARK LECCESE 



The Student Activities Tax Funds 
may go as much as $180,000 into 
debt when the fiscal year ends June 
30, according to Undergraduate Stu- 
dent Senate Treasurer Michael 
Doyle 

The University Ace lunting Office 
has frozen all dispersements from the 
SATF, which is made up of $1.2 
million that is payed by 
undergraduate students as the Stu 
dent Activities Tax Fee and 
distributed by the Undergraduate 
Student Senate to about 50 
Recognized Student Organizations, 
and $1 2 million of self generated in 
come from the approximately 350 
other Recognized Student Organiza 
tions that are not funded by the 
senate, such as Earth Foods and the 
CO ops 

The causes of the deficit will be 
cash flow problems, over- 
expenditures by several RSO groups 
and outstanding deficits the Senate 
has from years pas.t, according to 
Doyle and Paul Hamel, staff assistant 
to the vice-chancellor for student af- 
fairs. 

According to Doyle, the RSO of 
fice, which keeps the records and 
balance books for the 400 RSO 
groups, has been about two months 
behind in issuing balance statements 



to the groups. • 

"Somebody in that office is suppos 
ed 

to be able to place their hands on a 
group's financial situation at any 
time But now they don't have cur- 
rent, accurate information, " said 
Doyle. "Usually the reports said that 
the groups had a lot more than was 
actually in their accounts ' ' 

Doyle will submit a budget for sum 
mer operation to Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs Robert L Woodbury 
today, and will also be submitting a 
cash flow diagram for the SATF 

According to Doyle, this summer's 
budget will be "payroll intensive 
there won't be much supplies or 
operating support The Course and 
Teacher Evaluation Guide will prob 
ably be our major expenditure. ' Ven 
dors, groups or companies which are 
owed money by the SATF wiM also 
be paid, Doyle said. 
"What will happen is that sometime 
during the summer, people (summer 
employees) will have to skip a pay 
check and will wait until the end of 
the summer to pick it up," Doyle 
said. 

The first item on the senate's 
budget for the fall will be the liquida 
tion of this deficit, according to 
Doyle and Student Government 
Association Co president Robert 
Dion There was a catagory for 
deficit liquidation on the budget sub 
mitted to the SGA co presidents 



f)efore the end of last semester ac 
cording to Doyle. 

The CO presidents, Dion and Donald 
Bishop, vetoed the budget because n 
contained a $7.50 hike in the Student 
Activities Tax fee for 

undergraduates, according to Dion 
Dion IS also the student member of 
the board of trustees 

Doyle said the deficit w^ close to 
the amount they had projected 
Iwfore the end of the semester 
Doyle also named some of the major 
deficits the senate has incurred as 
being $27,000 from this spnng s 
Black American Music Festival, 
$18,000 from last year's Spring Con 
cert, and $24,000 that was over 
budgeted by the senate's Budgets 
Comn»ittee. 

This overbudgeting was not the 
Budget Committee's fault, " Doyle 
said. "They were working from 
estimates of the incoming classes 
supplied to them." The estimates 
were too large, and so not as much 
money was paid into the SATF as 
was expected, according to Doyle 

Large deficits were also reported by 
the Sylvan area, Greenough and 
John Quincy Adams snack bars, the 
Senate Print Shop, the Collegian, 
Counceling Assistance for Older 
Students, the Senate Note Service, 
and Student Senate Operations 
Some of these were from past 
budgets, and were never covered 




/- 



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The world's tallest library is seen here from the view "♦ the world s smallest person ( Photo by Dave Rodgers) 



Colle gian 



vVtrdne-irtay, June 7, 1978 




Compromise near 
on UM budget 




St.ite Representative Jamas G Collins 



A compromise on the UMass Amherst 
budget may be har »mefed out soon be- 
tween the State House, the State Senate 
and Governor Michael S Dukakis, ac 
cordinq to James G Collins. D Amherst. 

CoHins yesterday said in a telephone inter 
vit'w UMass had asked the legislature foi 
an $81 8 million budget for fiscal year 1978, 
which t)egins July 1 . 

The qo^^rnor recommmided a $76 million 
biKlqei the Senate recommended $79 
million and the House recommended a 
total Inidget of $78 million, according to 

Co'hn^ 

t (1 iikt • I compromise worked out 

A\ about . ^ on. Collins said He also 

said he would like to get as close to the 
f iqure the University requested as possible 

We re in a f^etter position this year than 
n the past years The governor didn t 
fpcommend a level funding budget as he 
has done in the past years. ' ' Collins said 

He expects the budget will be passed in 
tim** fr,f the new fiscal year 

UMassAmherst s budget tor tiscai yeai 
1977 was S72 million, according to Collins 

MARKLECCESE 



Meeting ends; 
town budget short 

The annual Amherst Town Meeting ended 
last week after a month-long 1 1 session 
continuation of budget and zoning battles 



The 219th Town Meeting this year began 
May 1 . culminating r: over 40 hours of 
budget hashing anu re- hashing The town 
as a result received $100,000 less than town 
officials had wanted Also, the town's zon 
•nq policy was changed, apartment com- 
i)i*?x owners were ordered to install smoke 
'letectors in their buildings, the no fare 
busline in town was voted to be extended, 
and a new recycling program was voted to 
l)eqin 

Town Meeting attendance dunng each 
session was about 200. according to Town 
C'e'k Estelle Matusko. The body has 255 
iv»?nib€rs The highest attendance of 225 
wiis recorded during the second session. 
T»^p Irjwest attendancsof 152 was recorded 
,it I ho last session 

- LAURA KhNNbY 

Former UIVI prez 
mulls Boston post 

former UMass President Robert C. 
Wood confirmed earlier this week that he is 
considering the position of superintendent 
of the Boston Public School System as well 
as considerinq running for the U.S. Senate. 

"The two are uoinpletely separate con- 
cerns " said Wood in a telephone inter 



view "Each week something else seems to 
develop; I'm in my usual ambiguous situa- 
tion which characton/ecl my career at 
UMas«; 

Wood. 58, said lu .... o:,k. ,1 over the last 
several weeks if he would consider the 
possibility of bt>comiiig the city's school 
super tniendent by a number of people in 
ihe Boston school system. I told them I'd 
be gljd to consider •'"• !><.^t;h..tv ^o i sem 
in my vitae." he Sn 



id to bring nev. 



I ■■..j.iliun pliin in 
•' into the system 
ii' ijive It the capuLitv ii> deal with voca 
imnal education I tfiink it would t>e impor 
tant to do An effective |ob, " Wood said. 
The school system is the key to urban 
•fwrtl. renaisance and revitalization If 
w..- can get a good big city school system, 
we can keep the young families in the city 
1 build up the neighborhoods." 

With the right tools, said Wood, "the 
Boston school system can be greatly im 
proved 

LAURA KENNEY 




Former UMass President Robert C. 
Wood 

Budget director 
takes new post 

UMass Budget Director and Vice- 
president for Management Katharine H. 
Hanson, who is leaving her position here 
August 1. has been appointed executive 
director of the Consortium on Financing 
Higher Education. 

The consortium is a nationwide group of 
30 leading private institutions of higher 
education Based in Hanover, N.H., the 
organization provides its member institu- 
tions with a mechanism for sharing and 
analyzing information on matters such as 
enrollment, financial aid, and admissions 

Hanson came to the UMass central ad- 
ministration office in Boston in 1973, and 
became budget director of the University in 
1975 She will assume her new position 
August 14. 

-LAURA KENNEY 



Bromery to name 
new v.'Chancellor 



Chancellor Randolph W. Bromery has not 
as yet decided upon a replacement for Ac- 
ting Vice-chancellor for Student Affairs 
Robert L. Woodbury, who after two years 
will leave his post July 1 . 

The search committee for the position last 
month submitted to Bromery for final con 
sideration the names of Sandra J. Clark 
from Florida International University and 
Dennis Madson from Colorado State 
University Bromery earlier this week said 
he has already interviewed Clark, but will 
interview Madson "within the next two 
weeks" He expects to make a decision 
sometime after the interview. 

Woodbury said he will be leaving for a 
vac.'jtion%i early July, and is scheduled to 
begin teaching classes once again in 



September as a member of the faculty ot 
the School of Education. 

"I've stayed in this position a year beyond 
what I originally said, '" Woodbury said. 

"It's time to step down " 

LAURA KENNEY 




Vice- Chancellor Robert L Woodbury 

A ffirm a tive a c tio n 
unpopular 

A survey of UMass students taken by Pro 
lect Pulse shows that a majority of students 
feel that affirmative action programs are 
not necessary to bring minorities fully into 
the American mainstream and that a ma- 
jority of students favor the now passed 
Panama Canal treaties. 

Of the 1 16 students interviewed over the 
phone by the Student Affairs Research and 
Evaluation Office, 63 percent felt to "a little 
or very little extent, " that affirmative action 
(m)qrams were needed. A larger majority, 
/6 percent, "felt to a little or verv little ex 
tent that quotas, reduced requirement or 
programs of a similar nature should be used 
to promote racial equality," according to 
the published survey results. 



More than half the students surveyed felt 
that affirmative action programs violated 
the fourteenth amendment, even though, 
the '^ I both were designed 

l(' II- lectives 



Of the 1 16 students interviewed, 
descril)ed thems«'i> '>«. !s .^1 >.io ' 



106 



Sixty percent agreed with the proposed 
P e ima Canal treaties, which had not been 
1 ...ssed by the US Senate at the time the 
survey was taken The treaties place the 
entire Canal Zone under the flag of Panama 
.ind acknowledge Panamanian sovereignty 
as of 1999 



MARK LECCESE 



OANSKIN 



X 







'^•V 



111 Mm. lit. 

Downtown Amherst 



O 'Neil appo in ted 
acting security dir. 

Gerald T ONeil earlier this week was ap- 
pointed acting director of security at 
UMass following the resignation of former 
Security Director Saul L. Chafin 

Cluitin left UMass May 27 to become 
chief of police .it Harvard Radcliffe Univer 
sity in Canibridge. He came here as 
associate director for operations in 1972, 
and became security director last year after 
David L. Johnston resigned to become 
director of police at the University of Penn 
sylvan la 

O'Neil will serve as the principal security 
officer of the University, with responsibility 
for directing and overseeing the ad 
ministrative and operational functions of a 
police and security guard force of about 
100 personnel 

He IS a 1954 graduate of the Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture at UMass. He served 
two years in the Army and worked one year 
in horticulture at UMass before joining the 
Department of Public Safety as a 
patrolman in 1958. He achieved the posi 
tion of associate director of security, a p>ost 
he held for six years. 

LAURA KENNEY 




Gerald T O'Neil 



JUST LIKE 
MONEY 

IN YOUR 
POCKET. . . 





CLA. 

GET RESULTSi 
It's no gambh 

Classifieds have- . 
i^gpen! vt>ringini|^ 
results to your 
classmates for 
years. , ^Why not- - 
p^t. .yg,Mr . mon^ 
or^a siKe^hing ^ tt 
COLtfGIAN > 

claissTfieds 

SELL 



•.'■ *d> • ' 






'••••* 4 



■^oilegiai; 



270 profs withholding grades 

"acuity CO n tract talks co n tin ue 



MARK UCCESB 



tized th« 



> have 



•Yia;ij5ii 



•ffi. 



'Anyone who has withheld grades 
is acting illegally' 

-James B. Krumsiek, trustee 



Lynne Seymour, a member of the MSP 
staff, the union that is representing the 
faculty in the current contract negotiations, 
said there are about 900 faculty who taught 
undergraduate courses last semester 



University Registrar Ralph D. JonM. 
whose office processes and releases grade 
reports to students after each semester, 
said his office had tentatively planned to 
process grades this Friday, but that no 
decision has ' 'ached on when or how 

to process tt • —. that have been turned 

in tci the administration. 



"We have lots of ideas that need to be 
discussed We want to handle this so that 
the student is not injured," Jones said. 



Grade reports issued to students would 
show a blank space where the professors 
did not turn in grades, according to Jones 
A blank space counts as a failing grade and 
would hurt students Grade Point 
Averages, he said 



Grades withheld from the administration 
have been turned in to the MSP offices, 
and are locked in a safety deposit box at the 
First National Bank of Amherst, Seymour 
said. 



tracts witn the university Whether tfie 
money is used as a raise or a bonus is at tf>e 
discretion of the univensty, he said 



State Representative James G Collins, D 
Amherst, yesterday said. The two and a 
fialf increase was voted for employees at 
the University It is the legislature's intent 
that It be paid The money is being held 
l>ecause of trustee policy ' The trustees are 
the authority for the University. arnJ it is 
their vvlsh to use the two and a half per 
cent as part of the contract ' ' 



Seymour said the University not giving the 
money to the professors is a "punitive ac- 
tion ' The two and a half percent bonus 
was given to everyone at tf>e University ex 
cept those groups bargaining for a union 
contract the faculty and the clerical 
workers, she said 



Seymour also called the withholding of 
the money a "divisive action," saying that 
the administration was trying to split MSP 
members from the rest of the faculty. Of 
1.200 faculty members at UMass, about 
420 are members of the MSP 

Randolph W Bromery, UMass Amherst 
Chancellor and University vice president in 



'if it is illegal, we'd like 

them to cite some regulations' 

'John H. Bracey, MSP president 



The grades of seniors, graduate students, 
students on financial aid and students who 
requested their grades be turned in were 
not withheld from the administration, ac- 
cording to Seymour. 



Negotiations between the two groups 
have been going on since Thursday on the 
UMass Worcester campus. The faculty of 
UMass-Boston, also being represented by 
the MSP, is involved in the contract talks. 



The faculty has never had a unionized 
contract with the administration. The MSP 
was founded in February, 1977, and con- 
tract negotiations began last summer. 



Representatives from the MSP have said 
that grades will be turned into the ad- 
ministration when a faculty contract is 
agreed upon. 



charge of labor relations. Monday said, "I 
believe the union has made the decision not 
to have a contract by next fiscal year I July 
1). I'm not sure of their reasoning. They 
may be trying to make the administration 
look like bad guys, make the administration 
look like they're dragging their feet." 



Acting MSP President John H. Bracey 
responded to Bromery 's charge by saying, 
"That's obvious nonsense. It was the union 
that asked for continuous bargaining. If we 
don't get a contract by the end of the fiscal 
year, we don't get a raise for 1977. Why 
would we want to go a year without a raise 
for our members?" 



Bromery also said the faculty has "no con- 
tinuity on their bargaining team." 




tiit^ni ! 



as wfiFTi d 



•m Ih^i t 



We want to handle this so that 



the s tuden t is not injured. ' 



-Ralph D. Jones, Registrar 




A squirrel peers over the top of a campus trashcan, 
bleed. (Photo lyy Geoff Cohler) 



rching for Ms deilv 




SUSSCMmONS 



Co editor 

LAURA M. KENNEY 
Co editor 

MARK A. LECCESE 
Business Manager 

LAURIE A. WOOD 
Gr;i|)hirs Manager 

BARBARAS. LAMKIN 



On campu* and a(l ean\pu> 



tZM Summw 



Miiil rt«'livefv lo Univetsilv c«mpu» «nd Amhersi ura »»m» 
lni«in«&s cMv ot puMcalion All olhei aiea* oi Mauaclius«ttt 
rlfMnr«fv InHnwinq (toy Outwde ol Ma«MCtHi*etlt «llow 2 or 3 (t«v> 
(Wivpry Svnd clxKh or monev o«1ef lo the MaaactHaaR* Sum- 
m«« Co»«fi>n Room 111 Campus Center Urtivertity ot 
Mats.<cnusetis Amhefsi. MasMct<u«eii« 010G3 Plea** allow 1 
wrfcli Irw rleliv^fv lo »«»rt 



The otlic« ol (he Mb 



ts located 

m Room 1 13 ot the Murray LirKoln Campus Ceniar on Ihe Univar 
sityol Massachusetts campus Telephone StS3S00 



The NkaaachuaMia Sui fw Calaflan is accepted tor mail 
ing ur>der Ihr aulhortty nt an act ol Congress March 8. 1879 and as 
amended Jurte 1 1 1943 

Second class postage is pa«l m Amherst. Masssachusens 01003 
Thf MMMchuMMs Summar Oala«tan publishes every Wertnes 
iMv May 31 1978 through Augmi 16 1978 ir^rlusive 



£2i!egian. 



Five labs still closed in 
Grad Research Towers 



ByMARKLECCESE 

Five labs remained closed late last week in 
the three building, 17 story Graduate 
Research complex as environmental tests 
continue after f he complex had been closed 
for a week due to possible health hazards 

University director of Enovironmental 
Health and Safety. Donald Robinson, said 
a lab inspection program, begun when the 
labs were reopened May 26, is continuing. 

Air, ventilation and water quality tests are 
also continuing, according to Robinson 

Under the lab inspection program, each 
lab in the complex is reviewed by no less 
than three people; a principal investigator 
in charge of research, the safety co 
ordinator for the lab's department, and a 
staff member of the division of En 
vironmental Health and Safety. 

These teams will be doing ar evaluation of 
each lab and making specific>recommenda- 
tions for improving its safely procedures, 
according to Robinson. 

Robinson also said his division is working 
with the Physical Plant in the establishment 
of a more formalized preventive 
nnaintenance system for the building. 



The towers were ordered closed by Dean 
of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
Seymour Shapiro, on May 19, after a group 
of workers who had complained of general 
discomfort and menstrual problems were 
found in a test by a private lab to have in 
their systems high levels of toluene, a com 
mon lab solvent 



Subsequent tests at a state laboratory on 
the same samples showed no contamina 
tion, and tests taken three days later on the 
same group of people showed no con- 
tamination. 



Shapiro said there was "a very thin strand 
which now connects toluene, or any other 
organic compound in general, and these 
symptoms " 



A survey of over 300 employees in the 
research towers is underway, but as of last 
week, only about 100 responses had been 
collected. 



The total cost for closing the buildings and 
running the tests was between $30,000 and 
$%. 000 according to Shapiro 



Wednesday, June 7, 1978 



-i-^^^S V»^"l»Si^» • 



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vnth each $3 
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HADLEYAMHERST Route9at the Hadley-Amherst Line. Sa.m.-lOp.m., Mon.-Sat. We redeem your Federal Food Stamps. 



« Coljegian, 



Summer 



in 



Southwest 



Although devoid of students, 
the Southwest Residential Area 
last vw s ek showed diverse signs 
of summer. 

At left, flowers bloom at the 
bottom of Codidge Tower, and 
below, discarded furniture lies 
ptied outside Kennedy Tov««r as a 
resuh of the annual dorm clean- 



Wednesday, June?, 1978 



Wednesday, June?, 1978 



»iP 



photos by Laura Kenney 





ARTs/Music 



'CoiiegiaQ 7 



Marion Brown:to thesourceof creation 




T-SHIRTS 

GYM 

TRUNKS 

JOGGING 

SUITS 



IMPRINTED 
AND PLAIN 



WE HAVE AN 

IMPRINTING MACHINE 

IN THE STORE AND CAN 

DO MOST ORDERS WHILE 

YOU WAIT. ALL AT GREAT 

PRICES. 



SUMMER HOURS: 

MON.-FRI. 8:30-4:30 



auhe UNIVERSITY STORE 

campus center 

parK in the campus center parking garage for easy access 




Call 
256-0441 



103 N. Pleauanl Si., AmherM 
THE FASTEST DEUVER Y //V THE VALLEY. 



ClW 
256-0441 



ITALIAN PINNER SPECIALS 
FOR SUMMER 

MON - spaghetti & Meatballs 

TUES — ^" P^ ^*" ^^* '^'"^ *^ 
l/l/EP - stuffed shells 

THURS - ravioli 

FRIPAY "■ cheese manicotti 

SATURPAY - lasagna 

SUMMER HOURS. 

SUN - THURS 11a.m.- 9p.m. 
FRI - SAT 11a.m. - 12midnight 



Marion Browffi 

Soto Saxophone 

Sweet Earth Records 

Marion BrovMi £r Gunter Hampoi 

Reeds 'nVibea 

Improvising Artists 



Reviewed by KEN SHAIN 

Still holding out to the temptations of 
commercial success and on to his integrity 
and individuality is Marion Brown, who 
now has two releases out that between 
them define not only his artistic sensibilities 
but demonstrate his solo skills as well 



Seemingly occupying the space vacated 
by this season's exodus of past masters to 
the market, brown bridges the gap be- 
tween rnusic's mainstream and vanguard 
by perfecting a sound of self expression 
that captures and contains elements com- 
mon to all our lives and articulates them 
beyond critical social analysis. Neither in 
terpretive nor precipative, f^arion's music 
links facts and ideas m a historical con 
tinuum that goes beyond markets, beyond 
individuals, all the way to the source of 
creation itself Plague yourself with tfiat 
idea for a while; here is a mdn whose music 
»s the front and bottom line of human 
soiinrf ifs»>if N"Mh^mpton couldn't do bet 
t»i 



Soto Saxophone opens with "Hurry 
SuiKlijwn. d smoker evoking, besides the 
lean sinewy tinqefs and ttie fierce and 
biiHious eyes of Mr Brown, images and 
emotions right out of Bert and Katya 
Gildens' novel of the same name "Angel 
Eyes' and "El Bochinchero" round out the 
ijfMierous 25 minute side, further 
ilnnionstMtinq the self creative dimension 




being developed by Marion and providing 
solos within access of the average ear. 
"And Then They Danced" begins side two 
setting a pace raced down to the "Encore, ' 
through "La Placita" and 1001 musical 
Ideas sonically transformed into history 
right before your very ears. 

Produced by Rick Jeffery for Sweet Earth 
Records of Northampton, Soto Sax 
ophone is both a welcome addition to any 
serious music listener's library and firm 
representation of what is possible here in 
the vallev. 

On Reeds 'n Vibas. Marion is joined by 
vibraphonist Gunter Hamp>et for a mixed set 
of duets and solos Splitting the flute and 
percussion chores between them. Hampel 
and Brown cover a lot of ground on tnis 
studio recording blending their multi- 
instrumental skills in synthesizing a sound 
of ease, quite different from the self- 
expressive sound of Solo Saxophone 
Here we have several intimate cunversa 
tions between two very talented artists. 

And Tfien They Embraced," seemingly a 
tie in to Solo Saxophorw's "And Then 
They Danced. " opens the album and sets 
the mood with Gunters vilies. Brown solos 
on Solo," but here, his studio solo lacks 
both the immediacy and the vitality of Solo 
Saxophone Side two finds Marion and 
Gunt«'r collaborating on a couple of more or 
tess plaintive numl)ers, "Flute Song" and 
"Improvisation." hiQhIiqhtinq their multi 
instrumental skills in developing and com- 
plementing each other's innovation 

It Marion Brown ever decides to cross 
those self created bridges between fact 
and value and enter the market to sell, on 
the basis of these two recordings there will 
be a lot of people listening and wishing him 
well As It stands now. we do .inyhow 






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ROUTE 9 HADLEY ^'"^Jr;;"'^ I M fj M ^ ^q l|fifi.9'\Ad 



»^*#'>->^! 



8 Colle gian, 



Wednesday, June 7, 1978 



Wednesday, June?, 1978 



Sex hotline in S.F. 
a 'ringing' success 



♦♦^(♦♦3MB|c4e4t«4c4c4e3Me4e4c3|c4c4c 



Hit Fad)* 
Sandii 



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49' 



By RASA GUST AIT IS 
PACIFIC MEWS SERVICE 

Among the telephone crisis lines offering 
emergency aid to people m distress, one of 
the most unusual is the San Francisco Sex 
Information Service 

Its trained volunteers offer factual, non- 
|udgnu?ntal answers to anonymous callers 
from Hs far away as Texas and Kansas The 



fort IS made to help them think clearly 
about their behavior. 
When a 13 year old boy called to say he 
planned to make it" \A/ith his 13 year old 
girlfriend, the SFSI counselor questioned 
him on whether the girl also wanted to and 
whether they had thought through the im 
plications But when a 20 year old man 
wondered whether he and a certain 16 
ypHf old ciirl would be compatible, he was 



also 30* cones 



W fti 10 9d -. 
M tuM 10 6 Sdl S"" 12 9p It, 




AMHERST CYCLE SHOP 

253 Triangle %\. 
549-3729 

NORTHAMPTON BICYCLE 

21 Pleasant %\. 
586-3810 

BIKES, 

PARTS, 

SERVICE, 
EXPERT REPAIRS 
ON ALL MODELS 



WED 

LUNA $2 



Bicycle craftsn<i>n 



THURS 
ESTES BOYS $1 



organization is one of four such services in 
the country, the others being in New York 
Los Angeles and Sonoma. Calif 
The people who call are usually nervous 
even though they will never see the 
counselors to whom they whisper ques 
tions they haven t dared to ask anyone they 
know They stumble over words for fear 
they sound weird, silly or too innocent for 
their age 

In the four years of its existence SFSI has 
reassured men and women panicked by 
fear of failure, told young girls and boys 
about birth control, steered lonely people 
toward places where they might find part 
ners and dissuaded others from illegal acts 

It has gently tried to help children who are 
victims of sexual abuse within families 

On a few occasions, it has even referred 
men who like to talk dirty on the telephone 
to another phone service, which will listen 
or talk back for a fee. thus preventing 
unpleasantness for unknown strangers. 

"Research has shown that the vast maion 
ty of sexual worries can be resolved by in- 
formation," said Joani Blank, 39, a public 
health educator, sex counselor and one of 
the early SFSI volunteers 

"A boy may ask Tell me something 
about masturbation ■ The answer may be 
Practically everybody does it ' That, to 
him, may mean a lot, allaying a terrible anx 
lety " 

Then there is another group of people, a 
smaller one, that needs specific sugges 
tions Like the person who calls and says, 
I'm not a man anymore ' A few simple 
hints could solve his problem. Only a very 
small number of people require intensive 
therapy. That's the one thing we don't do 
We refer But we know that the person 
who calls might never go elsewhere So we 
try to be as helpful as we can ' 
In knowing that it might be the callers' on 
ly recourse, SFSI is like other telephone 
switchboards that offer emergency help 
and information the suicide prevention 
services, the talk lines for parents who 
abuse their children or the women's and 
gay switchboards Only the sex services, 
however, are known to have counselors 
especially trained in sexual issues 

One recent evening, three men and two 
women sat at the SFSI phones, each behind 
a small desk in the living room of the small 
apartment that serves as office They had 
few free moments 

Many o f the calls were from adolescents 
According to a survey sponsored by the 
National Institute of Child Health and 
Human Development, 35 percent of girls 
between 15 and 19, nation wide, are sex 
ually experienced. An informal survey in 
the Bay area showed that up to 60 percent 
of teenagers here may be sexually active 

"It's amazing how many of them don't 
have the least idea what they're doing," 
said Billy Robinson, 24, an SFSI volunteer 
'An alarming number have not thought 
about birth control." 

The staff, which consists of heterosex 
uals, bi sexuals and hornosexuals, holds to 
only one basic principle: Whatever 
transptres should be within-the context-pt 
informed consent, with as much sensitivity 
as possible Callers are informed when ac 
tivities they talk about are illegal, and an ef 



told she was 'jail bait. " and - after about 40 
minutes on the phone steered toward 
some groups where people without part 
ners could go to meet others. 

Meanwhile, on another phone, a IS-year 
old boy who wanted to know why p>eople 
rape and molest children was hearing about 
the difference between fantasy and action 
Tf>e SFSI staffer sensed this inquiry was 
more than abstract and was feeling for the 
real question 

Studies show that child molesting, par 
ticularly incest, is far more common than 
most people believe SFSI volunteers find 
calls about this subject most deeply troub 
ling 

A 15 year old boy called to say his mother 
and a woman friend of hers wanted to have 
sex with him He was frightened. What 
could he do? "I suggested, 'If it's not 
agreeable to you. don't do it,' " said Robin- 
son 'Children often don't realize they may 
have a choice" 

Some of these callers would probably 

TURN TO PAGE 11 




FRI 

GYPSY 
w/ comedy leom 
SIR OM BERC 

COOPER $2 

SAT 

CARILLO 
ond GYPSY 
olse: SIR OM BER 
& COOPER $2 




Uexler frees the feel. 

GIVE YOUR FEET 

^DEXTERl)^ PLACE ;n the 

^ SUN In the mellow leather and 
easy styling or Dexter sandals 



SUN 

LOOSE CABOOSE 

$1 




Back to School 



By LEE BURNETT 

As happens every June, after the 
hubbub of another academic year 
has died down, the UMass alumni 
once again descended upon their old 
stomping grounds for a reunion 
weekend. 

One thousand graduates ranging 
from the class of 1918 through the 
class of 1958, with every fifth class 
represented, last weekend enjoyed a 
program of activities orgameed by 
the Alumni Office. They had the op 
portunity to speak with Chancellor 
Randolph W Bromery over 
breakfast, or hear about the men's 
football and basketball teams from 
head coaches Bob Pickett and Jack 
Leaman. There were tours of the 
library and Fine Arts Center as well as 
luncheons, dinners and a Bloody 



MON TUES 
THE VULCHERS $1 



■ SHOE STORK 



39 So. Pleasant St. Amherst 



Soups-Salads 

Sandwiches 

Quiches 

Bagels and Spreads 

Baked Goods 

Homemade 
and Always Fresh 

at Faces next to the Amherst Post 
Office 
.hours: 9 30 to 600 



2S6-09S5 



COMING 
June 16£r17 

NRBQ 

June 22 

DEREK 
DERRINGER 



June 23 & 24 

TAJ M ANAL 



Sunderland. MA. 
IRte. 47/ Tel. 665 4937 



COLLEGE DRUG STORE 



Scho// 



Exercise Sandals 

the pntrvtedanvdnl 



Cool comfort from sculptured 
European beechwood. 
foam -cushioned straps In 
ligfit or dark-toned wood 
and strap colors that go 
everywhere with V 

everything ^;- 

REG ie.95 




lOW 10. fS 




BUF-PUF 

r^)ruTiedic<ited ( leansitiq Sporv^e 

For 

beautiful 
skin I 

reg. 2.41 salel,r9< 1.69 




While they lost!! 



4 MAIN ST 253-2^23 AMHERST 





Mary Brunch. 

Perhaps the highlight of the 
weekend was the awards luncheon 
on Saturday, at which alumni were 
cited for distinguished service 
Distinguished Public Service was 
awarded to James G. Collins ('68) 
who IS the state representative from 
Amherst; Paul Theroux ('63), a 
novelist, received the Distinguished 
Professional Service Award. 

Four people were recognized for 
Distinguished Service to the Univer- 
sity: Hoben D. Gofdon ('48), former 
member of the UMass Board of 
Trustees for 14 years, Robert Gage 
('381, former vice-chancellor and 
director of the Health Services 
Robert P. Lawrence ('22)' 
vetennarian, and the late Edgar M. 
Brown CIl), who set up the scholar 
ship endownr>ent fund. Alan Shaler, 
former trustee, was also named 
honorary alumnus for life. 
The most visible evidence of the 
UMass alumni is the gifts they 
donate to the University. For irv 
stance, this year the Cl^ss of 1928 
enjoying their 50th reunion, con- 
tributed a photography exhibit 
valued at $25,000, now on display at 
the Fine Arts Center Gallery. Gallery 
Director Hugh Davies claims it "the 
foundation of a fantastic collection " 
Last fiscal year, donations to the 
Alumni Annual Fund reached an all- 
time high of $303,325, with nearly 
15.000 alumni contributing. 
The Alumni Fund has traditionally 
sponsored a wide variety of pro- 
grams, including University Without 
Walls, BDIC, the Honors Program, 
the Office of Internships, and awards 
for academic achievement Steven 
Sadler, director of alumni relations, 
also stressed the political influence 
alumni can brina to bear in defense 
of Public Higher Education. 
A numt>er of alunmi who were inter- 
viewed this weekend expressed their 
concern for UMass Dennis Crowley 
(29) said, 'what is most unfortunate 
IS the obvious effort of the governor 
to take on the University as a branch 
of his office." 

When asked what she held for the 
future of UMass, Barbara Isaacson 
(53) said, "They (the government) 
may cut back in the short run but not 
in the long run " Richard DriscoH 
('53) said, "Once in a wNle you have 
to slap the governor and legislature 
on the seat of the pants. ' ' 



I CLASSIFIEDS 



Apts for Rent 

Furn Apts i . 2 nnd 2^^ Rms. For 
SuMimer Occupancy Pool. Pkg., Air 
Cond Near Shopping Amherst Motel 
and Apts Rt 9 opp. Zayre's. 256 8122 

Wanted to Rent 

House for Family of 3, July August 275 
Furn Call 549 3990 After 5. 



For Sale 

TIRES » Wheels 

5 Firestone Steel Belted Radials HR7E-'i5 
mounted on mags 253 7065 



REGENCY 4 



Available in mens & womens styles. 
Sporting Goods of all types in stock 

PfcL«T«llt 



. i 




1 E. PLEASAirr ST., AMHERSf S49-«fNI4 



We have the latest 
styles in mind 

for you! 

"ask about our 
apprentice 
haircutter" 




3S39S26 1S»N.PIIA$ANT$T..AMM«$T 2S3-7341 




THE CELLAR 



*"'^^1^i«» » *fc»>#fc— <»»»i» §<■■—» ^ rf > i»w»iW^» ■ > »■ 



. . .> 



«••• •••**»••• •'k'l'. .".".•,'.*.*.*.•.*, 



•••>«<>««>t<t>«lltlltl 



»-»»»• 



i . . • . • k Vft'cVW^^^W^H*) 



To wardTo morrow Fair 
coming next weekend 



■ ^AS MAJOU 



•fd Tof^mr »t> . 



'iUiTian 



16 

r 



: ;^¥ the ; 



:"ifn 



sion of 



C 
Ur 

tv the _j, j.j..^ ^, ^ 

Population Growth. Acn p'owert' • 

Systems, Eckanon the *■ • *,* 

P'Sheries the Massdchui, 

o* Food and AgncuHure, dua 8.0 fenefow 

Systems 

The exhibits wiil be constructed on the 
iawn around the library and the Campus 
Pond In addition to the approximately 200 
exhibits, the fai' (Arill include three solar 
greenhouses, a solar heated 40 foot home 
and SIX geodesic domes 

On the first day of the fair, speakers will 
include ecoiogist Barry Commoner who 
will deliver the keynote address at 8 p m 
former Secretary of th*> Inter - Stewart 



festu'i 



H.jidwvin editor 0< 

--. .^,,,,,. ^ n . .- ^ 

• "•€ U.S Dt-; 

M.iKjofson civiu acttv.»t <*na author o^ 
t " iting Alternative Futures, and 
•njist educatorarchitect R 
► r^iinster FuWer. Fuller r- April has 
'he UMd&b scholar in I . ,. 

" "'i'^" w.iibeincon 

'^^^^ P**' 5 and Tom Pax 

ton on June 17. 

The fair will run on Friday from noon to 6 
p.m on Saturday from 11 am to 7 p m 
ana on Sunday trom T am to b p m 
Tickets are available through the mail and 
will t>e sold at the gate 

Those who wish further information about 
the fair may contact the Toward Tomorrow 
Fair coordinator s off ice in 102 Hasbrouck 




R Buckminste» Fuller (left), vUw vmHI be apaaWng at the Towird Tomorrow 
Fair, talks v^h Dean of the School of Education Mark) D. Farrtini. The Fair 
begins Jur>e 16 artd ends June 18. 



Notices 



UNION S TEREO CO OP 

The Stereo co-op is open dunng the 
summer: Tuesdays 10 1, Wednesdays 14, 
and Thursdays 4-7 for all your audio needs. 
Special hours by appointment Call 
545 1594 Stereo co op is located in Room 
166 Campus Center, next to the Collegian 
TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION 

Free introductory meeting on 
"Transcendental Meditation Discovering 
Inner Energy, and Developing Higher Con 
sciousness." Wednesday June 7th, Cam- 
pus Center, Room 806-d0i9. 
HORSEBACK RIDING 

Weekly lessons offered to students and 
staff throughout the two summer sessions. 
Classes run through August 18th. $5 per 
lesson for students, $6 for non-students. 
See Sandy at Tillson Farm, or call 545 0260 
or 546-2371 Classes mn on Fridays: 8 to 9 
Beginner I. 9 to 10 Beginner II. 10 to 11 In- 
termediate I, 1 1 to 12 intermediate II. 
THEATRe GUILD 

The UMass Music TKteatre Guikj is now 



accepting applications for the production 
of Its fall musical Anything Goes." to be 
performed in mid NovemtMsr in Bowker 
Auditorium 

Non salaried staff positions, open to 
anyone in the Five College area include: 
producers, director, musical director, 
choreographer, set designer, costunr>e 
designer, lighting designer, technical direc 
tor, stage manager, props manager, master 
electrician, and master carpenter. 

Those interested in applying for a staff 
position should prepare a resume of their 
theatre experience related to the desired 
position. Applications can be mailed to: 
UMass Music Theatre Guild, RSO Box 507, 
Student Union Building, UMass. Amherst, 
Ma 01003. 



Brina your notice to the Collegian office, 
113 Campus Cente'. before Friday after 
noon. Notices are free of charge. 



Intramural sports 



Below are tf>e tntramiiral tour 
naments that «mN be held this sum- 
mer. To partidiMte in a tournament, 
rou must have a summer recreational 
stidier. Stickers are available in 22S 
Boydan. 

Thoae sports marked (OR) are co- 
recreational First date is tf>e date en- 
tries are due, secor>d date is when 
play begins. Sign-up is in the In- 
tramural office, 215 Boyden Most 
activitiea wmN take place Monday thru 
Thursday, from 4 to 7 p.m. 



6/12: 



Craas Coumry Raor entries, 6/20 
8 8/1: play 6/20 £r 8/1: Stadium 
Road 

Hm ndbt M. entries. 6/12: play. 6/14: 
Boyden Couns 

PaddWMt: entries. 7/25: play, 
7/27: Boyden Courts 



(CR): entries, 
play, 6/14: Boyden Gym 
SquMh: entries, 6/12 £r 7/25: 
6/20 & 8/ 1 : Boydan Courts 



play. 



I: entries. 6/6 & 7/19: play. 
6 8 Cr 7/24: Intramural Fields 

Tannia ICR): entries, 6/8 £r 7/24: 
play 6 13 & 7 26 Lowers Tennis 
Courts 

VoNaybaM (CR): entrres, 6 6 b 
7/19: play 6 8 6 7 24: Intramural 
Fields • 

Racquetball: entries, 7/25: play 
7/27: Boydan Courts 



IfoundiNn 
the classifieds! 

COLLfiGIAN 
CLASSIFIEDS 



ARE TERRIFIC • 




tssssss^- 



Beat the high price of 
PRECISION HAIRCUTS 



For His 
&Her 

inckidps; 




\ 



I 



FIRST ■ d fir(if»>*.«;innH! • o»i*.MlMtion 

SECOND - a prei:i<>ion style cut 
selected indivtduaUy )ust for vou. 

THIRD • our stylists will show 
you hou to take care of you.r hair. 

^"^*^ $8.00 

PERSON.Al STYLt CUT 
SHAMKX) & BLOW DRY 

long hdur tUghlly more 

on To*- & W«d. onK 

^uHh (hii roupon only 

Umiled lo r)«ir cuttomers only 



Wednesday, Juna 7. 1978, 



Live Entertainment 
& 
Dancing 



Call for appt. 549-5S10 



r 

g7NITES a WEEK 

m 

M 






Tonig h t 
SltYLINi 

Th urs Sat 
M OUNTAIN LIFi 



J 



C&CLIOUORS 

BFMIND THE PO L It: E STATION 
row SUDDEN SERVICE DELIVERY 253 3091 



INGLENOOK BURGUNDY $5 39 
I. CHABLIS "; ■ 

31 !*__ n_«.»i« additionol 10% 

Liter Bottle di..o„„, ^„ ,.,,, 



NATIONAL BOHEMIAN 
$1.25 $4 99 



Sun 
DAVE WALT ON 

Mo n h Tues 
WILLIAMS « VALAN 



92 Main St 

The Florence Section of Northampton 

4 Miles West of Smith College. Rte 9 

I 584 7613 




Jacques Cohen's 

PAMELA 
ESPADRILLE 



six pack 



case 



SCHLITZ 



$6.99 



VODKA 

quart 



$4 99 




irS HME Mr 

TENNIS 



Summer wouldn't be 
. summer without thLs 

authentic jet setter espadnllc 
from Jacques Cohen. 



Fenton's has the best 
in tennis equipment. 

Choose from: 

RACQUETS- Bancroft, Wilson, Spalding, Davis, 

Dunlop 

BALLS- Spalding, Wilson, Dunlop, Tretorn 

SHOES- Tretorn, Nike, Adidas, Converse 

Restringing and Ragripping 
(We aiso carry WMta Stag Speado Swim¥¥ear.) 

mrai-s ATiuiie ssmiES 

377 Main Street Amherst 253-3973 




wlif i^T^ lacrosse tMm. pKaured here earlier in the 
year in a match against Brown Universitv. placed third in 
JHJ country during the United States Wormn^s Lacroeae 
_Toumamarrt in Harrisburg Virginia last vweek The UMbbs 
team VMhich had been seeded fifth in the toumarnent 
^^H .f** *^^ .*^*"** Madison College and third seed 

Women 'slacrosse team 
tal<es third in nationals 



By SHANDOR PETTRIE 

HARRISBURG, VIRGINIA In only its 
third year of varsity competition, the 
UMass women's lacrosse team captured 
third place in the country during the United 
States Women's Lacrosse Tournament 
here last week. 

Pennsylvania State University, which won 
the national championship by defeating 
Maryland University 9 3 in the finals, was 
the only team to beat the Gazelles. The 
UMass team, seeded fifth in the tourney, 
upset host James Madison College in the 
first game and nipped third seeded East 
Stroudsburg State University 5 4 in sudden 
death overtime to capture third place. 

UMass won the first game 7 1 over James 
Madison without the services of 
defenseman Gayle Hutchinson, who was 
suffering from a sprained ankle. Deb 
Hartley scored UMass' first goal as she 
came around the net and let go a high shot 
which eluded goalie Dale Ford for a 1-0 
lead. Other first period scores by Julie Hall 
and Cari Nickerson gave UMass a 3 lead 
at half time. 

Judy Kennedy, who was later named to 
the national team for her outstanding play 
in the two-day tournament, scored the 
fourth goal. UMass dominated play for the 
remainder of the game and used its fast 
break offense to score three more goals. 

UMass advanced and played Penn State, 
first seeded and first round winners over 
Rutgers University. Penn State quickly 
showed why they were top seeded as they 
took a 2 lead. UMass was having prob- 
lems with an aggressive Penn State 
defense but Fiona McAllister scored to cut 
the lead to 2-1. 

UMass Coach Frank Garahan noted that 
his team was successful to this point in 
containina Penn State's leading scorer, 



^Sex hotline 



Sharon Duffy Duffy was the first collegiate 
player to make the national team and 
Garahan had defenseman Grace Martinelli 
stay with her, denying her the bait The 
strategy worked in that Duffy only scored 
two goals during the game but Charlene 
Morett, another top offensive player, 
scored four goals, three in the first half, to 
give her team a 6-1 halftime lead 

Penn State scored the next two goals and 
held an uncatchable 8 1 lead before Ken- 
nedy and McAllister added late scores for 
the final 9 3 

On Sunday, the final games were held and 
UMass was in the consolation round 
against Easy Stroudsburg for third place. 
UMass fell behind and was never ahead un- 
til the sudden death overtime oenod when 
Del) Hartley came arouno the net, similar to 
her first goal of the series, and took a high, 
hard shot for the score. 

UMass was down 2-0 when Kennedy took 
a pass from Sue Kibling and fired in a shot 
from 12 feet out which cut the lead to 2 1 
and Jean Hackett's goal tied it at halftime. 

East Stroudsburg took 3-2, 4-3 leads and 
each time goalie Robin Jennings' fine saves 
kept UMass in the game Hackett's last 
goal which was a backhand scoop shot was 
with )ust minutes remaining and sent the 
game into overtime. 

Hackett, with her three goals in the final 
game led the team in scoring in the final 
statistics for the year. She scored 35 goals 
and had 21 assists for 56 points which is the 
single season record. Hartley was second in 
scoring with 33 goals, 16 assists for 49 
points and Kennedy ended with 35 goals 
and 13 assists for 48 points. 

Nickerson, who was the team's leading 
returning scorer from last year, had 16 
goals and had a single season record for 
assists with 28. The team ended the season 
with a 17-1-2 record. 



CONT. FROM PAGE 8 
never go to anyone whom they had to meet 
face to face. It's anonymity of SFSI that 
makes the service accessible. For many, 
the service can be a psychic life-line, even 
for those with much simpler problems who 
are too embarassed to ask about things 
they think almost everyone knows or does. 

That includes volunteers and it helps ex 
plain why they are willing to pay a $75 fee 
to be tiained to staff the phones. The fee is 
what keeps the service going. During nine 
weekly sessions and a weekend, prospec 
tive volunteers hear frank discussions, 
watch films made by the National Sex 
Fonim and talk personally with other 
Udinecs Thn f.iLi that they're doing all this 
to help others also makes i! possible for 



■ them to help themselves. 

Among these volunteers are many people 
in the helping professions who, like the 
three San Francisco women who founded 
the Service, discovered that sex is a subject 
shunned by many counselors. 
_ 'I work for Youth Advocates, " said Garry 
Bassin, 20, who was a trainee last month 

A lot of people told me if I took this I'd 
know how to talk with the kids. And also I 
needed to get my own stuff straight before 
talking with thern." 

Joe Klaas, a novelist, volunteered for a 
more pragmatic reason. "I found out the 
difference between realistic sex and por 
nography," he said. "I learned I wrote 
roalislically about everything except sex 
When Its 100 percent successful - that's 
pornography " 




MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 



VOLUWEV ISSUE 3 WEDNESDAY. JUNE 14, 1978 




S«ude»uN*iw«pjp«r Qfrn* university or" M.isvK.hw*«iK Amtter« ma oma% (jnn saS 35«u 



riu 



A video scmening ot ; .: collection of 
films porifaying black arttsts from Louis 
Armstronq io John Collrane will be held 
this Friddv and Saturday M the top toor of 
23 PifHSH'it St . Nofthuinpton Donation 
will bv $2 50 for ddults and SI 25 for 
children The films will bn shown at 2 30 
and 8 30 p m . and each showing v/ill last 
two hours 



Featured will t-: such artists as Fats 
WalU.'r, Lest«ir Young ii(.no.c- t-^c^ueA. Cab 
Calloway, Sammy Davis. Jr,, and Bill Bo 
janyles Robir»son 



Bessie Smith. Ethel Waters, Billie Holiday, 
Ella Fit^yerald and the big bands of Duke 
Ellington and Count Basie 



' Su'ni! on Film Series will pri; 

• i .1 Mt-r . .■ VisiK; tTht; Marvelous 

ViMf ,) f fcncii film with English subtitles 
<)ii-i t( <t t)y Man.el Carcie and based on an 
H (j ^A/f;lls short story, tfus Tue' day night, 
.it 7 30 and 9 30 p .n in the Campus Center 
Aiidtinruiiii Adniissiori is f'ee 

1 ' I'j •iMivif 1-1 iiJMMii o yuuiMj Ijiond man 
who falls from thn sky , and, whon awakened 
purports tfj bt: an angel He radiates in 
Morcnce and tries in his riuifa Ajy to extend 
his charitable feelings to » ,r- .esidents ot 
ttie Frcru h viMi'i'' whf.i> » . ' ippened to 
land 



T hi: Marvelious Visit is a film t)oth children 
.ind adults will en)oy The film has received 
critical acclaim and several awards in both 
France and the United States 



PerForiviance 

HANA H.inrtall McCiullaii will perform 
•■!•■( irjmii musK in the Campus Center 
totMi^it at 8p.m 

Randall McClHIan as RANA has been per 
rirming hts elcf tronic niusic smce 1972 

McClellan .s a professor of Music at Hamp 

shire College 

During nis UMass visit Professor Mc 
CIcll.in will instiiKj "Twentieth Century 
Music in America." a workshop offered by 
rhe Summer Arts Hostel 

I'll ,in..(;i, IS heiny presented by Sum 
mer Activitu'S 78 in to operation with the 
Arts Extension Service, 

Tickets are available at the door. Prices 
are; $1 for senior citizens and children. $2 
for general Hostel participants and sum- 
mer students will be admitted free of 
charge with a valid ID. 




Wgcjnajdav. Jun« 14, Wm 




«I2I^cC^^SJT.^^.^^*^ ^ '^* unanimously appointad to tha 
K^^JSiJJLS^h^t^i I^ ««to ctK>n of Knapp by a -cnrt ballot has 
Djan chaiangad by tha Maasachusetts Nav«papar PubKshare Associa- 




L 



Chairman of tha AmhaiBt Board of Selectman Diana H. Romer tells the 

^ ? J'f r ^ ""i!!"^ ^ " Sreet impact on the ^^ W 
^2^he tmstees last week voted to exempt juniors from mandatory 
housmg and dining requirements. ( photos by A/brfc Leccese) 



Grade reports issued 



-aC^^Uggian 



Re- elect Knapp 



Trustees vote 
for exemption 



By LAURA KENNEY 

BOSTON The UMass Board of Trustees 
at its monthly meeting last week 
unanimously voted to exempt juniors from 
mandatory on campus housing and dining 
and approved an $8 Student Activities Fee 
increase. 

The board also officially appointed David 
C. Knapp to the position of the eighteenth 
UMass presidency and voted that his salary 
be $58,000 which is $1,500 less than his 
current salary for the position of Cornell 
University provost. 

In addition, Knapp was given a hbusing 
allowance of $800, and was given tenure as 
a professor of political science. It is 
customary procedure to give a University 
president a tenured professorship. 

The vote to end mandatory housing and 
dining for juniors came after both the Stu- 
dent Affairs and Budget and Finance com 
mittees last month passed a proposal writ 
ten by Acting Vice chancellor for Student 
Affairs Robert L. Woodbury, former Stu 
dent Government Co president Marion L 
Batiste nd Student Senator Daniel Salse A 
similar proposal was brought to the 
trustees in 1975 but was not accepted. 

Prior to last week's vote, only seniors, 
married students, veterans, students com- 
muting from the home of parents or guar 
dians, and resident memtiers of fraternities 
and sororities were allowed to live off cam 
pus. 
According to Woodbury, UMass is the on- 
ly public university in New England which 
requires that students live on campus 
beyond their freshman year. He stated in a 
May 12 memo to Chancellor Randolph W, 
Bromery, "A move toward a voluntary 
system would enhance the values of 
choice, lessen the socially destructive 
aspects that have derived from a man 
datory imposition on older students, and 
emphasize an educational rationale for 
freshmen and sophomores. " 

There is, however, a question as to 
whether the town of Amherst and surroun 
ding towns can accomodate the expected 
increase in the number of students moving 
off campus. A survey of housing options is 
currently being taken by a member of the 
Residential Resource Management office 
to determine the effects expected from the 
new housing rule. 

Trustee Diana H. Romer. who chairs the 
Amherst Board of Selectmen, said, "The 
University has a great impact on the town's 
housing; one third of the beds in the town 
of Amherst are on the University's campus. 
The town has no objection (to juniors' ex 
emption from the housing requirement), 
and there is no direct conflict. However, we 
urge that the University take into account 
the impact on the town." 
The trustees' unanimous vote to appoint 
Knapp to the presidency was taken in an 
open roll call, apparently in an attempt to 
ease the conflict over the secret balloting at 



the special May 15 meeting held to elect a 
new president to replace Robert C Wood, 
who stepped down in January Franklin K 
Patterson has been acting as intenm presi 
dent since that time. 

The Massachusetts Newspaper Publishers 
Association has filed a suit against the 
trustees for allegedly violating the state's 
open meeting law in their May 15 session 
The board went into executive session for 
three hours to discuss the merits of the five 
final presidential candidates, among them 
Chancellor Bromery The trustees recon 
vened 

in open session to conduct secret balloting, 
where Knapp won 12 out of 20 votes on a 
second ballot. 

The newspaper association's executive 
director Joseph Doherty said the trustees' 
executive session violated the open 
meeting law because inadequate minutes 
were kept, the professional qualifications of 
the candidates were not discussed publicly 
and the final vote was by secret ballot The 
suit, which will be heard June 26 in Suffolk 
Superior Court, calls for the court to in 
validate the meeting and order a new 
meeting. 

In other action, the board passed a list of 
seven guidelines for the further develop 
ment of goals and missions for the UMass 
Boston campus, set forth by the Commit 
tee for Long Range Planning Knapp has 
said such development at the Harbor cam 
pus is an "urgent issue." 

Included in the new policy is the intent to 
increase admissions, especially of up- 
perclassmen, to establish complementary 
goals with Boston State College and 
Massachusetts College of Art, to develop a 
plan for new graduate and undergraduate 
programs, and to emphasi/e the op- 
portunities offered by the new Kennedy 
Library and state archives, to be located on 
the Hart>or campus. 
Long Ranqe Planning Committee Chair 
man Paul G. Marks said, "The guidelines 
represent a reasonable beginning; a 
framework which will give us a structure 
which we will build specifics on." 

The University's central offices will be 
moved this month from the rented space at 
One Washington Mall in Boston to the 
newly renovated quarters at 100 Arlington 
Street- According to Interim President Pat- 
terson, "There have been minor delays in 
construction. The lease on One 
Washington Mall terminates July 31, and 
we will move over the weekend of July 22 " 
The Arlington St renovations cost 
$980,000 

The trustees also voted to approve the 
establishment of a doctoral program in the 
medical sciences at the UMass Worcester 
Medical School. According to Frederick S. 
Troy, chairman of the Committee on Facul- 
ty and Educational Policy, the program will 
enroll five students next year, eight in 1980 
and 10 in 1981 Enrollment is "not expected 
to go beyond 50 students, "Troy said 



Faculty may turn in withheld grades 



By MARK LECCESE 

The 270 faculty members who have 
been witholding almost 10,000 
undergraduate grades from the ad- 
minisjtration for 26 days may turn 
them in some time this week. 
A decision on whether or not to turn 
in the grades, which are being 
withheld by the Massachusetts 
Society of Professors in protest of 
the on-going faculty contract 
negoti.-'tioMi>, will be made at today's 
meeting of the executive board of the 
MSP, according to Lynne Seymour 
a staff member of the MSP. 
The MSP IS the union that is 
representing UMass Amherst's 1200 
faculty members in negotiations with 
the University for the faculty's first 
collective bargaining contract. 

The University Registrar's office 
with an estimated 10,000 out of 
90,000 undergraduate grade hiss- 
ing, began to process grade orts 
last Friday. Processing of tht ^rade 
reports was finished over the 
weekend, and the reports are being 
mailed to students this week ac- 
cording to the Registrar's office. 
'We have de\/1sed a way of putting 
in those 10,000 grades without hur- 
ting the student,' William E. Cicia 



said last week. Cicia is in charge of 
data processing for the university. 

Cicia said the blank spaces on the 
grade reports will be filled in by a 
special, 'non-puntative' grade. 

'It won't show up in the grade point 
average, said Cicia. It won't hurt 



the credit summary -if anything, it 
could help a student who is a 
borderline case.' 

The non-puntative grade will repre- 
sent a course in progress,' but not 
be an 'incomplete,' according to 



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Cicia. The course grades will have to 
be fitted into the computer manually 
when the MSP turns their grades in, 
he said. 

Faculty members who partcipated 
in the withholding of grades did turn 
in grdaes for seniors, financial aid 
students, students involved in 
transfers, and for any students who 
requested their grades not be 
withheld, according to Alvin E 
Winder, vice-president of the MSP. 

Everybody would like to' turn in the 
grades, said Seymour, 'but it 
depends on negotiations continuing 
to go as they have been . ' 
Seymour said negotiations between 
the faculty and the administration, 
which have been going on since last 
fall, are now going 'more smoothly 
than they ever have. ' 

Larry Roberts, a nnember of the 
MSP's executive board and a 
member of the faculty's negotiating 
team, said at the UMass Amherst 
commencement. When the negotia 
tions begin to flow and the ad 
ministration comes to its senses, we 
will turn the grades in to the ad 
ministration.' About 90 faculty 
members staged a walk-out at com 
mencement exercises on May 27 in 
protest of the stalled contract talks. 



rollc ^ ian. 



Wodnpsddy, June 14, 1978 



'We 're going to keep it going ' 



By DEBBIE SCHAFER 

Theatre audiences will experience some 
ve'v new thinqs riext month when the 
Commonwealth Stage presents its summer 
nhase entitled "Theatre In The Works " 

Seated onstage in "an unusual theatre en 
vironinental space. " viewers will have an 
opportunity to witness and discuss four 
new plays in the developmental stages of 
production A minimum of attention will be 
given to costume, lighting, and set details 
with the emphasis instead upon the script. 

Conferen€:es among the playwright, 
dramafurg. director, and acting company 
are ongoirig as the script moves off the 
written page following one week of 
rehearsals each play will be performed in 
public twice The audience is invited to 
discuss the play with all ntembers of the 
production company, including the author, 
after each public performance 

The plays will be Gus Kaikkorien's 
"Ramblings" on July 7 and 8. Joseph 
Mathewson's "Man Proposing" on July 14 
and t5, Karolyn Nelke's "Casualties ' on 
July 21 and 22, and Da/las Murphy Jr. s 
' The Terrorists ' ' on July 28 and 29. 

Andre Bishop fias been appointed Artistic 
D"f'rrnr for Theatre Ir) The Works " He is 
nirrrntly on the staff of Playwrights' 
Hon/ons of New York The workshop for 
mat is one "wfwte you have to be prepared 
to cope with a degree of risk, " he said, but 
also offers a lot of artistic freedom 

The low keyed production detail con 
siderably lessens the cost of staging these 
pl.iys. according to Executive Producer 
David Knauf It also ^lows for more atten 
tion to ttte play itself, without superilous 
details "We should t>e able to do this /ust 
like water off of a duck's back." Knauf 
K,vd 



I've l>een interested in the theatre since I 
vwds old enough to talk." mused Oavid 
Knjiiif . wvhen wve sroKe with him recently in 
► its concrete and carpet Fir>e Arts Center of 
*ire When I was a tiny, tiny boy I used to 
•Ao to the theatre all the time Even as a 
ynifno porsnn I was aiwfiys putting on 



some kind of show. When other kids were 
out playing cops and robbers. I was 
Iniilding stage sets and models of stages. 

Ive never lost that interest." Knauf said, 
tn a classic example of understatement. 

As chairman of the UMass Theatre 
Department and executive director and 
fi)under of the Commonwealth Stage. 
Knauf IS hard at work behind the scenes on 
a full time, year round basis It is not an 
easy iob. "It s been a long, hard struggle." 
he said "This was a small and sporadic 
department with a very small budget. In 
those lean, lean years we've |ust come a 
long, long way and I am very proud of 
th.it 

Brand New Department 

Knauf 42, came w> UMass to assume the 
role of theatre departn^'ent chairman in 
1972 At that time UMass did not have a full 
scale theatre department. Limited offerings 
in theatre studies were offered as division in 
what was then called the Department of 
Speech. Knauf's first task was to "nurse it 
along through the administration" so that 
an independent Department of Theatre was 
finally established in April 1973. 

That situation is one reason why Knauf 
left his position as an associate professor at 
tf>e University of Iowa to come to UMass, 
as he explained 

It was an interesting moment in time. 
UMass was one of the last maior public in 
stttutions in the country without a very 
well developed theatre program, and I 
thought It would be a good opportunity to 
try out something new That seemed very 
attractive to me at the time, and still does." 

Despite the "lean, lean years" of limited 
budgets. Knauf said his department has 
evolved into a very experimental program, 
one that is quite different from the rest of 
the country " He explained that expenmen- 
tation would probably have been inpossi 
hie at a school with a well established ex 
isting program. "You can't (us; walk into a 
structured program and say "Zap' It's all 
changed'' " he laughed. 

Restructur«xi Program 

Over a two and one half year period 
following Knauf's arrival the training pro 
gr.int in thcf theatre department was 
'f<;tfurtifred at all levels What resulted, ac 



onwealth Stage 



><r) 




J 



Chairman of the UMass Theatre Department, founder and executive 
director of The CommonweaKh Stage David Kruiuf (photo by Debbie 
Schafer) 



0) 

«^ 

c 
u 
(/) 

0) 

L 

O 

> 



O 

a 



cording to Knauf. was a very comprehen- 
sive, liberal arts undergraduate major'' 
which requires "an obligation to 
demonstrate some level of expertise in all of 
the areas of theatre." 

The graduate program stresses a profes 
sional approach to theatre in which 
students can specialize in directing, 
playwrighting; dramaturgy^ scene design, 
costume design, and lighting design. "It is 
a three year professional program." Knauf 
said, "and tfiis is a brand new concoction 
since I've come here." 

Another brand r>ew concoction ' in 
UMass theatre is the Commonwealth 



Stage, which begins its second season this 
July in the Frank Prentice Rand Theatre in 
the Fine Arts Center (the theatre is also the 
home of the University Ensemble Theatre, 
the production arm of the UMass theatre 
department) 

The Commonwealth Stage is the newest 
member of the League of Resident 
Theatres and is under the airectorship of 
Knauf Hesaid he was "enormously pleased" 
with last year's opening season and 
feels "encouraged to continue" with it this 
year. "It's here, and we're going to keep it 

TURN TO PAGE 8 




Chapel closed 
for roof repairs 



The Old Chapel one of the campus's 
oldest buildings, was closed Monday for 
repairs to damaged roof trusses 

The building was closed by the University 
Department of Environmental Health and 
Safety after they were told by Physical 
Plant employees that there were problems 
witfi the roof, according to Donald A 
Rof)inson, director of Environmental Health 
and Safety 

There was deteriorating of wooden roof 
trusses tfirough water seepage over an ex- 
tenr'.ed penod of time, " Robinson said. 

A Northampton firm, Aquadro and Cer 
ru'i. wi'i he doing repairs this week The 
hui'dtfiy will be closed for at least a week, 
Hc«:o'ding to Robinson. 

Work car be done much more effectively 
wiifi r)Pop'e out of the building. " Robinson 
said 

QHices in the O'd Chapel have been tem 
porijniy moved to Room 263 of the Fine 
Arts Center 

MARK LECCESE 

Director Stein way 
leaves FA C post 

Director of Development for the UMass 
Fine Arts Center Frederick Steinway has 
esiqned from his post because of what he 




termed administrative and financial prob 
lems with the center 

Steinway, the grandson of the founder of 
Steinway and Sons Corporation, a 
business famous for ifj pianos, left his job 
June 1 He came to the Fine Arts Center in 
the fall of 1974 and supervised its opening 
tt»e following fall. 

He said he will stay m Amherst but was 
not specific as to his future plans. 

Summer fees 
explained in detail 

The $42 Summer Services fee that all 
enrolling summer students pay for each six 
week session has raised question on exact- 
ly what services are offered. 

The $7 weekly fee is split up between 
three budgets: $3 for Health Services; $2 
for Campus Center operating costs; and $2 
for Student Activities. 

The proiected revenue for the Student Ac- 
tivities office IS $36,000 for the summer. 
That breaks down this way: 

WMUA (radio station): $4000; Legal Ser- 
vices Organization: $1500; Recreation- 
Intramural: $5500; Summer Arts program: 
$5500; Day Care: $1500; Film Series: 
$1500: Collegian (subsidy): $2500; Con 
certs $6000; Summer Recreation for 
children of married students: $500; Ad 
ministrative costs $60(X); Operational costs 
of programs: $1500 

GOEFTULL 

r I 1^ 



Research labs open 
after toluene tests 



All of the labs in the three tower, 17 story 
Graduate Research Towers are now open, 
according to Donald A. Robinson, director 
of Environmental Health and Safety for the 
University. 

The building was closed May 19 after a 
group of employees in the building who 
had complained of general discomfort and 
menstrual problems were found in a test by 
a private lab to have high levels of toluene, 
a common lab solvent, in their systems. 



Subsequent tests at a state lab on the 
same samples showed no contamination, 
and tests taken three days later on the 
same group of people sfiowed no con- 
tatiiination. 



Most of the labs in the building were 
reopened after extensive air, water and 
ventilation tests were taken on May 26, but 
five of the labs remained closed last week, 
pending continuing environmental tests. 



The Department of Environmental Health 
and Safety is now conducting follow-up in 
spections on many of the labs, according to 
Robinson. 



One lab needed repairs on its chemical 
testing hoods, a sealed chamber in which 
chemical experiments are conducted, 
Robinson said. 

MARK LECCESE 

Frisbee contest to 
be held next week 

The Yankye Flying Disc Open, A World 
Frisbee Chanipionship Series regional tour- 
nament, will be held on June 24 and 25 at 
UMass. 

Over 200 Frisbee players from as far away 
as Florida and California are expected to 
compete in the various events. Competitors 
will earn International Frisbee Association 
Series points toward qualification for the 
World Frisbee Championships to be held 
for the I'ifth consecutive year in the Rose 
Bowl in Pasadena, California this August. 

Admission to the tournament is free. 




Co erlitor 

LAURA M KENNEY 

Cr, t'd'Tijr 

MARK A LECCESE 

LAURIE A WOOD 

G' i|)i'>' '. M)' ■f'\'-' 

BARBARAS LAMKIN 



^ SUBSCRIPTIONS 

On can^us and off campus 



M SO SuiTVTwr 



WhiI fifflive'v "J U"ive'silv (dr^piis Jnfl Amheisi d'ea san>e 
I .(■•■"••ss flitv ol uutilicdTion All other jtedi o* Massachusetts 
fl.'iivprv following (tav Oiitsidf ol Massachusetts •<»<'*> i or 3 (lays 
MH<iv**rv S**r>fl rt»Hi fc or rTionpv orrler To the Muuachusans Sum 
m«f Collegian Room 113 CarnpuS Center Urnveisitv ol 
V.iss-tr I'us.'iis Amherst Massachusetts OlOOi Please allow ' 
/vc. fc 'oi ilelivery •(> Stan 

The ottire ol the Massachusetts Summer CoWeqian is locaterl 
• flfMjr'i 1 13 ol Ihe Miirrdv I) Inii oiri Ca"H'"i Cenler tin the Univer 
**'»'»* Massachusetts ' ar'ipos Telffphone ^6 3VXJ 

The MMsachusetts Sumnwr CoNagian >s accepted for mail 
iiKI u'lrli" '>'•• .I'.t' 'loty ril jn ar I '•' ronqr>>ss March 8 1879anrlas 
dfiu-rulecl jM'>e 1 1 1943 

Sec rjiwi class p<)Ma<je is paid in Amherst Masssachosetti 01003 
^"1 MaMachusetts Summet Collegian i^ifiiishps .-vr', Acrinc-, 



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Wednesday. June 14, 1978, 



Bromery's future unclear 



■Colle gian 3 



Another chancellor resigns 

AURA KENNEY ecutive officer ,„, .„ ^.„ „ u. ■. . ^^ . ^^ 



By LAURA KENNEY 

Chancellor and Dean of the UMass 
Medical Center in Worcester Roger C. 
Bulger last week resigned from his position, 
becoming the third chancellor of the three- 
campus University system to announce his 
resignation within a year's time 

UMass Boston Chancellor Carlo L. Golino 
left his position in January, and Claire Van 
Ummersen has t>een interim chancellor 
since that time. Amherst campus 
Chancellor Randolph W Bromery an 
nounced his resignation in March, effective 
June 1979. 

Bulger will leave Oecemt>er 1 to become 
president of the Health Science Center of 
the University of Texas in Houston He 
came from the National Institute of 
Medicine, where he had t)een chief ex- 



ecutive officer 

There was some confusion at the end of 
last week's UMass Board of Trustees 
meeting as to Bromery's resignation. When 
the topic of discussing procedures for set 
ting up search committees for Amherst and 
Boston campus chancellors came up on the 
agenda, Trustee Daniel Dennis questioned 
the reasoning behind considering a replace- 
ment for Bromery 

Dennis said no official response to the let- 
ter of resignation had t>een sent to Bromery 
by any member of the t>oard, and that no 
replacemrent should be discussed until 
Bromery had t)een spoken to about his 
position After some discussion anx>ng 
members of the k>oard it was suggested 
thar a meeting k>e set up with Bromery 
t)efore any action on a replacement is 
taken. 

Bromery had announced his resignation in 



order to clear himself as a viable candidate 
for the University presidency vacated in 
January by Robert C Wood Although he 
was among the five finalists for the posi 
tion, Cornell University Provost David C 
Knapp was elected last month 

Bromery earlier this week said, I was sur 
prised and shocked to find that a search 
committee to replace me was on the 
(trustees') agenda as there had been no of 
ficial response to my letter ' He said since 
last week's meeting he had spoken to 
board Chairman Joseph P Healey and has 
set up a meeting in the near future with 
Knapp 

Bromery said he has 'no idea' if Knapp will 
ask him to stay on as Amherst campus 
chancellor. 'He has to decide what he's go- 
ing to do, then I'll have to decide what I'm 
going to do,' Bromery said. 'I have some 
direct offers from agencies in Washington, 



DC I also have several private industry of 
fers. which I'm looking at more carefully.' 

After spending 20 years working for 
federal agencies and 11 years in state ser 
vice. Bromery said he would like to 'round 
out my life; maybe a decade of private in 
dustry wouldn't be bad I know it wouldn't 
he bad economically'' 

'It IS ratfter interesting that all the campus 
chancellors have resigned, but it is rather 
unfortunate that everything had to hap(}en 
at once,' Bromery said. 'A certain amount 
of turnover is good for any institution, but I 
think this mass exodus' could have a 
negative impact externally for the Universi- 
ty ' 

Thfere are several other top administrative 
positions open at UMass, including that of 
budget director and vice president for 
management and all three vice- 
rhancellorships at the Amherst campus. 



To ward Tomorrow Fair starts Friday 



By LAURA KENNEY 

Commoner, consumerism arnl conserva- 
tion will t>e the order of tf>e day Friday 
when the third annual Toward Tomorrow 
Fair t>egins on campus 

The fair, which will run through Sunday, 
will feature exhit)its t>ased on solar and 
wind energy as well as workshops and 
several speeches by prominent people in 
volved in issues ranging from ecology to 
consumer reforms to human rights. The 
event is sponsored by the University's sum- 
mer session in cooperation with the UMass 
Division of Cintmuing Education. Over 
20,000 people are expected to atter>d. 

The fair's keynote address will be 
delivered Friday at 8 p.m. in the Fir>e Arts 
Center by ecologist Barry ComnrH>r>er. 
author of "The Closing Circle" and The 
Poverty of Power ' Former Secretary of 
the Interior Stuan Udail ar>d economics 
professor Kenneth Boulding will also speak 
on Friday. 

Eiivironmentatist Murray Bookchin, Urt>an 
Planner James Benson and Whole Earth 
Catalog Editor Stuart Brand wiN speak 
Saturday. arKi Secretary of Environmental 
Affairs for the Commonwealth Evelyn Mur 
phy, energy and shelter expert Amory 
Lovins and futurist R. Buckminster Fulter 
will speak SurnJay Fuller is presently the 
UMass scf>olar in -residence 

The ninth annual World Game, organised 
in conjunction with the Toward Tomorrow 
Fair, will focus this year on energy and 
shelter A symposium will be held June 
19-22. and a four week internship project 
program will follow. The world game was 
introduced by Fuller as a means to enable 
persons to be participants in addressing 
ways to service humanity's basic needs. 

Two folk concerts will be performed dur 
ing the event. Pete Seeger will appear at 
the Fine Arts Center tomorrow night and 
Tom Paxton and Dave Van Ronk will per 
form Saturday night Tickets for Ijoth con 
certs are separate from the fair tickets, and 
may be purchased at the Fine Arts Center 
Box Office as well as at all Ticketron 
outlets. 

Tickets for the fair are also available at the 
box office. For more information, contact 
the fair's coordinators office in 102 
Hasbrouck. 



t"*^' 



r- -r 



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BIKES, 

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An eKhibhor at last year's To¥«ard TomomMv Fair shov« off his 



pyramNls for the hMd. (photo by D«bbi« Scfwfart 



Demers leaves RSO post 



By MARK LECCESE 

Coordinator of Student Activities Ar- 
mar>d H. "Bud" Demers announced last 
week that he had requested and received a 
transfer from the Student Activities office. 

Demers will \x replaced by Paul J Hamel. 
who IS presently a staff assistant to the 
vice chancellor for student affairs. Hamel 
said that he will serve as acting co 
ordinator of Student Activities while keep 
ir>g his office and some of his duties in the 
student affairs office 

Hamel has served as assistant business 
manager and acting business nr^nager of 
the Student Activities office 

Demers, who has been co ordinator for a 
year and was business manager of the stu 
dent activities office for eight years, will 
move to the office of Residential Resource 
Management His title there has still not 
been specified, but he said that he will be 



working with the "tjusiness aspects" of the 
office. 

"I'm frankly very pleased to be moving in- 
to that area I don't want to have to deal 
with the pressures I've had in the past year. 
It's taken a lot out of me, physically and 
mentally," Demers said. 

Demers has been suffering from a recur- 
nng back problem caused by moving a 
counter in the Student Activities office five 
years ago. 

"Relationships with student government 
are not as good as they have to t>e," he 
said 

The Student Activities Tax Funds, whose 
records are kept by the Student Activities 
office, may go an estimated $180,000 into 
debt this summer, due to cash flow prob 
lems, over-expenditures by Recognized 
Student Organizations, and outstanding 
deficits from past years, according to 
Hamel 

Hamel said Monday that the cash flow 



problems were solved 
The Student Activities office's accountir 
reports for the 400 Recognized Stu<" 
Organizations have l>een atiout two months 
behind, keeping the groups from knowing 
exactly how much nwney is in their ac- 
counts, according to Michael Doyki. 
treasurer of the Undergraduate Student 
Senate. 

Hamel said that he has been meeting with 
staff members of the Student Activities of- 
fice, "seeing where we are at." 

"First we'll bring the accounting records 
back up to date, and then we'll start look- 
ing at some of the long range issues," 
Hamel said 

"My biggest priority is to be honest with 
the Student Government Association, and 
hopefully they will be honest with me." 
Hamel said 

Hamel will begin as acting co-ordinator of 
Student Activities July 1 



ei cetera 
copy copp. 

TYPING & 
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233 N Pleasant St. 
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Dome being considered 
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233 N Pleasani Si lin the Cafriage Shoosi 
M<>693e 



By r\AARK LEK.CESE 

Dean of the UMass School of Physical 
Education David C. Bischoff Monday con 
firmed reports that he was looking into the 
possibility of putting an all weather, year- 
round done on Alumni Staium. 

'We had a feasibility study conducted, 
and the engineering firm came back and 
said indeed it was feasible, " Bischoff said. 

The problem now is how would we pay 
for such a thing." 

Bischoff estimated the cost of putting a 
dome over Alumni Stadium, which was 
built in 1965 and cost $1.5 million would be 
about $7 million. 

Bischoff said he would probably not go to 
the state legislature for the money, and that 
instituting a fee on the student fee bill 
would be "ill-advised" The athletic depart 
ment might ask the University to set up 

"the first capital fund drive they have 
undertaken in a long time " A capital fund 
drive would ask for contributions from 
alumni and others 

Final details on the proposal have not yet 
been released, according to Bischoff, 
because much to my chagrin, the trustees 
have not been briefed. " The UMass Board 



of I rusiees nave tinal authority on any on- 
campiis buikling 

"To start from scratch would be a ma|or 
project We would be taking a facility in 
which we have already made a significant 
investment and turning it into something 
thai ( ould be used all year round" 

Bischoff pointed out that presently, the 
stadium is only used five or six times a year, 
for home football games and for com- 
mencement exercises. 

Astro turf would be installed on the 
stadium floor for football, lacrosse and soc- 
cer and when those seasons are over, the 
turf could be rolled up and the concrete 
underneath could be flooded for a skating 
and hockey rinK, and a basketball court 
could be installed UMass does not 
presently have a rink for its hockey team. 

The engineering firm that made the 
feasibility study was the same firm that 
built the Silverdome in Pontiac. Mich., 
where the National Football League's 
Detroit Lions play. 

Dome stadiums constructed at other col- 
leges like the University of Iowa and the 
University of North Dakota, have also at- 
tr.icted local high school football cham- 
pionships. Bischoff said 



4 QlLlL'KiiLLl! 



Wednesday, June 14, 1978 



(EdlTORIAl/opiNiON ) 

Trying to save 
pub lie education 



By MIKE EN GEL. DAVID 
KAREN FITZPA TRICK 



GLOD and 



In the last few years, government on all 
levels has been abandoning its responsibili 
tV to provide social services for its people. 
Using the rhetoric of economy, efficien 
cy" and getting governn>ent out of peo- 
ple's lives. " politicians have slashed educa 
tion. health, welfare, housing and other 
vital services that the profit oriented private 
sector cannot and will not provide for 
everyone 
Public education has been one of the big 
pest victims of this trend Taxpayers are 
frustrated about a highly regressive tax 
system, and politicians have helped steer 
these feelings into self destructive actiqns 
such as California s Proposition 13. and 
Ohio s voter refusal to pay taxes to keep 
schools open In Massachusetts, these 
trends are reflected in the following form$ 
Raorganization of Public Higher Educa 
tion: On a state level the lack of committ- 
ment to higher public education is seen' in 
Secretary of Education Paul Parks plan for 
reorganization While private institutions 
(such as Harvard) call for expanded liberal 
ans programs to ensure quality education. 
Parks calls for a regionalization and 
specialization of programs state wide, 
eliminating the basic liberal arts program 
Parks also calls fof an increased tuition in 
the second two years of attendance at a 
public college or university and launches a 
direct attack on tenure However, we know 
that in a society as unequal as ours, ability 
to pay does not reflect commitment to 
one s oettinq an education What Parks 



refers to as a plan to eliminate duplication 
and a way to make more efficient use of 
resources is, in reality, a serious attack on 
quality public higher education. 
Cutbacks in Financial Aid: At the same 
tinu- the governor and legislature are telling 
public university students to be "realistic" 
and accept a $200 cutback in financial aid 
(when tuition and student fees are increas 
ingi, they are channeling 75 percent of the 
state's Board of Higher Education Scholar 
ships to private school students yet these 
students are not being asked to face similar 

realities' li e an overall decline in their 
rollpcjc t»ducation) 

Budget Cuts to the Public Colleges and 
Universities: Euphemistically termed 

level funding," these allocations are truly 
cutbacks when 8 10 percent inflation, pay 
increases and a decrease in quality are 
taken into account. And these cuts are in 
stituted at the very same time the 
legislature is appropriating new funds to 
private colleges and universities (1978 1 3 
million in new funds appropriated). 

Students United for Public Education is a 
Recognized Student Organization with 
chapters at Westfield State College and 
UMass. Amherst We are organizing state 
wide to counter these destructive trends In 
future articles, we will discuss in nrrore 
detail these and other trends and directions 
which public higher education is taking A 
SUPE workshop and informational table 
will be conducted at the Toward Tomorrow 
Fair and weekly study groups will be 
meeting in Boston and Amherst For those 
interested, leave a note in SUPE's mailbox 
464 Student Union Building or 5;op by at 
the table . 



Home for the summer 



ToitmBdhor 

On May 31st the Summer Session course I 
was pre registered for was cancelled My 
course was to begin May 30th at 9 00a m I 
went to class only to discover it was to 
begin the 31st I returned the following day 
and found eleven dismayed students who 
told me the class was cancelled due to 
undereprollment We had twelve students 
and we needed three more to start the 
class 

Consequently, we werealldisappointedand 
angered by the situation We decided to make 
an appeal to the administration as a group 
to reconsider convening our class Our op- 
timistic and enthusiastic group marched 
over to the administration in the hope that 
twelve demanding students could make the 
laws bend slightly m our direction. 

But ng one wanted tb aid us in our mis- 
sion We were sent from one office to 



JUST LIKE 

MONEY 

IN YOUR 
POCKET. . . 



another, no one answering our questions 
about what we could do m our particular 
case After the fifth plea our enthusiasm 
faded and we finally gave up. What's the 
use you can't fight the system, was the at 
titude that prevailed. 

When I went to get my refund from the 
course I found there were fifty nine other 
courses cancelled also. There were 
numbers of angry and disheartened 
students telling of similar incidents. Itseemsto 
me there is something wrong 
somewhere in the planning, organization, 
communication, and authorization of the 
Summer Session. But what can one expect 
from a mammoth university where 
numbers are the magic formulas and peo 
pie are /ust nonentities^ 

Home for ttie Summer. 
Margaret Otnl 




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COLLEGIAN 

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at A.J. Hastings 
eMTsdealer and stationer 
Amherst 



Wednesday. June 14, 1978, 




v" 



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FATHER'S DAY 



y 



Live Entertainment 
& 
Dancing 

7NITES a WEEK 

WED 

Hobo Flats 

THURS 

Fat Chance 

FRI - SAT 

Skyline 

SUN 

Ed Uadas 

MON ft TUES 

Scooter & 
The Red Wagon 

92 Main St. 

The Florence Section of Northampton 

4 MAes West of Smith College, Rte 9 

I • 584 7613 




iAeeS^Ji The Fresh Idea Company 

—JUNE 1 8— 

a great selection of cards 



at 



campus center/univ. of mass./amherst 

Mon-Fri 8:30-4:30 



•Collegian 5 



cttp''*!^ 



Extra 



foveas 






3i"v , the ac' 
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["^i j StopiS hop C oupon] ) (77|| v>'| Stop* Shop Coupon j, ^I?[ |\>.*[StopA Shop Coupon], [^^^^^top * Shop Coupon], [^i^lfsi 

^ loK ll Ifi-C il #> ill «. ^~'* 

One aim Sl KX'^ ISH*!???!^ !: Ep(g^ 






Any ro* Of c«nrK)ge Koda 
color Clio 126 Of 
36mm prnts brought m to 
tw dev«topM b*tore June 
1 7 Couocn exprM Jkiy 1 
Umil one pe« cu»lom«f 

293 




Powdered 
Drink Mix 

Assorted Flavors 

292 

0/ can 

Makes 
8 qls 

283 




99 



j:S Stop* Shop 

Coffee 
LighCener 



284 




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Now another value 
cho«ce from Stop A Shop 

NcMf m dddftun to tr«; tnOn viKwIy ol 
fWtanal brandK and our Stop* Sriop 
and Sun Glory Brandt «M oNar you 
anolhar value-ctVMce ««• «• latoelai) 
Ecorwnv and pricNd lo gM« you 
t/QPflkcan MMngs' on an everyday 



economy* good wtulaaome kwds 
ol USOA siandard grada or bc«la< 
Such as canned vegeiabtn iwmS car* 
ned touts \Affui nv*«s twm dMcrenT 
Sometwv^ »^P s</e color or Hi*v»r 
mjf v/«y kii>T\ Ihe umlormify toundjn 

^conotiy >s piam s«nola MfholnarTw 
siaptM Vial you ua* evnty day sue ^ 
as peAfXit buflm frwyonnaisp 

sCMxjnenf n -ai e s and prwkjwvf'i. 

Ecorxirrv <% basic good serviccatiir 
guaMy suc^ as houaatmd (xoducis 
pooerkMifHs hsauas and ptaakc bags 
The vnlu»-cho«« • yours r«aliorvri 
br^rxls our Stop A Shop or S4«i Glory 
Brands or Our new hne o> Economy 
ArKi plaaaa rwnember ■• you ar(> not 
c orwpMi O y satnkad lor any reason 
<M>ii gM^ yfi yon mnrwy back 



self service delip«*i«.youf 
Stop & Shop-Meat or 

Beef Franks 

or iib ^^09 

Extra Mild f*q 



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^% Laundry 
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Gallon ■ 
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Minute Maid 

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29 




I 

2^ 







Stop & Shop "Great Beef USDA Choice 

Beef Chuck 
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S«!«*Ouc«i 
boncm 



Sliced Bacon .....;,.. 139 
CokJCuts "v -i^r; j;:;c. ..• i 19 
Extra Mild Franks .-; i 09 
Bologna & Salami ' . 1 39 
ParKsSausage •".. 99 
Jones Smoked Sausage 1 49 



corner deli wrvre you get hoc 

•oods .ifKl last "u-fVK-p 



''lb 

1.09, 

1.3a 

^1.89 
*1.19- 
Beef Cutlets or Cube Steak '^ 2.29 



7- Bone Chuck Steak 
Underblade Steak 
Boneless Blade Steak 
26% Ground Beef 







normorelhan?e*-ht 



t.rni,.' H'.i.!. 

Sffloin Ch<>i)s 



79 



Ik 



Stop & Shop «^* 

PastromiA 

Cooked Ham . JA-.T^,. 2 29. 
Ausfnan Swiss Cheese r ~239 
Imported Salami ... '179 
Corner Dell Rolls .V'vWr: 75 
Turkey Breast .■*•.•?•:»;• 359 
Stop & Shop Cote Slaw ": 59 
Ham Salad v.'.^; 1 99 
Stuffed Peppers r.:,'.7r: 1 29 

''Pefna"Brand Natural Breads 

Bavarian Rye Bread . 69 
Bavarian Pump>ernickel . 39 
V Bavarian Dark Rye . 79 

our kitchen Let ok coot.s *> 

.111 the wrXK '01 yoi 

Fresh Turkey or 

Chicken Pie 

10 ouDce sjze 

Cooked Chicken ,.;*.::« 109. 
j:oleSlaw 59- 

frozen meat stock .0 00 0.1. 

fTXXiey- saving SDr*ci.ils 

Countryfine 

Beef Patties -^ 

3 pound box *^^99 



Assorted s^^q 
Poi4c Chops Jr 

Center Cut Pork Chops. Trw,sK:esw9«'1.69. 
Countrystyle Pork Ribs lo. 1 .39 
Boneless Sirloin Cutlets 1 .99, 

^■^ ^a^ Fresh 5-6lbs 

Hoasnng liig 
Chickens 7% 



w 



Tomato ^ Muellers Elbow ^ 

Sauce Macaroni 

Twists or ^ *^ 
Sea Shells A - A 

Upton LifiB Lunch ■ 2 1 
Hamburg Helper ■' " 59 

Twists & Meatballs or 

Baytoli 

Farmings Pickles " " 49 
Big H Burger Sauce "79 

Green Giant-Niblets 

Com 

4 1 



^^&4 1 

Penn Dutch Noodles 
Unclp Bens Rice 

Stop & Shop 

^pleJell; 

Mmtor ^^ 

Crabappte ^S 

Smuckers Preserves "99 
Dream Whip 59 

|C^ Stewed 

l^omatoes 

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99 



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Perdue Chicken Breast 
Perdue Chicken Legs 
Combination Pack 



.1 -4tos 

FafTnV Paci< 
3 -libs 



White Gem 3 spht breasts 
53mt 




3 drumsticks 3 fhiqhs 

Fresh Turkey Drumsticks 



BeeS Liver 



Skinned* 

Devemed 

Frozen 



3^ 



8-6oz dinner 
size patties 

Cooked Sausage .' " .v , 99 
Jones Link Sausage '. :.• 1 79 



69! 

Calves Liver ^s^g^-^ 99 
Rath Sausage Meat 

^2;,^^^^^^^^ I «) Roll QQ 



ll> 



frozen foods - , . ... 

Banquet Cookin' Bag Stop & Shop 

Entrees ^£1 French Fries 

M-H «..• *.-«.rW ^ ^k Re-jular Of JP ■ .*^ 

..«.•..,.* 1 ,►.,, •v.wj !.»».., Crinkle cut ^^^^'i-^H 

ChoppedBroccoli-..-.3 -. 1 Fillet OSole Dinner :: .7 59 

Strawben-ies ..* 59 Cod Fillets 129 

Qt Icecream ' ' 89 Chicken Nibbles ' - 199 

NuForm Ice Milk 99 Stuffed Peppers ;;,.; 179 

Frozen Yogurt : '2 , 1 Cheese Lasagna t?;^ '1 89 

ComboBars 1 19 Johns Pizza Slices r / 99 



Seabrook Vegetables 79 ■ enders Bagelettes - 49^ 

Oairy '""*' 'S '!,■•■'> rnonth *itri S0t?Cial tXJy*. pvffy vwek 

Promise Hood Grapefruit jDr 

Earine Orange Juice 

69^ ^^ 2^99 




J lib pkg 
'^Qtr lb sticks 

Hood Sour Cream 69 

Whippec* Cream 69 

Temp Tee Cream Cheese 99 



Bofdens Shakes ' r:' 3 1 
Fruit Flavored Drinks ' 69 



Light N' Lively- Lowf at All Natural 

Cottage Cheese Breyers Yogurt 

Sealtest ^%lOi Abbo.ied ^ .so, ^B#lf 

24 ourx:e cup ^^^^ Flavors .^pcups^y^p 

Swiss Cheese -..v;. ■ 1 99 Provolone Cheese -^zxrx, 89' 

Shredded Cheese-. ";■•*•,•". 49 Mozzarella :;.'.r~., 79 

Cheese Food Slices 119 Rondele Cheese '^l^?.',' 89 



Fresh 



produce bakery 

Were sIrcHlers lor qu.il- 
ity nnd heshne^s 



'Imtilv iniirirhfnls .n ,>vi<r\ fpcip* 



/ South Carolina ^^^^ A^V^S^k^ 

lueberries 79 

..wtyiofyon w Texas _fl 8 Size OT^^W^ 

iSSS^s^ Honeydews 19 



seafcxjd 



Stop & Shop Stops Shop-Top Slice 

Pound Cake Frankfurt 
69 Rolls 4 1 



GoldorMart5le 
13o(.ncepkg 



Choc Eclair Pie 89 

Countrystyle Donuts 59 



Big Daisy Bread .'■,%' 3 
Stop & Shop Bread 2 



Haddockf 

Tirm white fillets ^^^ 

Fresh Clams 59 

SnowCrabmeat ,' 179 

Dressed Trout '.: 159 

Fried Clams ' •. v 179 

Stop & Shop Shnmp 4 79 



Tampax Tampons 1.49 Shampoo J^t^, M.49 

M.-.i(,i.ir ,'■,.. pi-' l|i( ' i.K^ ,„ Crt-nie Rins(^8o; bll 



Fresh Califomia 

Apricots 

19 






Low Cal 

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79^ 



Walden 
Farms 



Yellow ^"^^f^^r^^KCOFTERNA 

Omons I t Saucepan 



Sfninless Steel Cookware ^ 

Covered *^^€k£k 

with e.ich ^^B|9«r 
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gg,^ 



HADLEY-AMHERST Route9at the Hadley-Amherst Line. Sa.m.-lOp.m., Mon.-Sat. Wc redeem your Federal Food Stamps. 



6 Colle gian. 



Wednesday, June 14, 1978 



Wednesday, June 14, 1978, 



The double- digit spiral Bernstein festival 



By LEE BURNETT 

For those of you who will be paying the 
recent tuition hikes and fee increases voted 
by the UMass Board of Trustees May 4, it 
will come as no surprise to know that infla- 
tion IS once again barrelling along at an an 
nual rate of 10 8 percent. 

The total tuition and fee increases amount 
to $142 The Student Activities Tax was 
raised $8, and MMsachusetts meals tax for 
students will be an added $22 The total fee 
increase will be $67 and tuition will be raised 
$45. 

Having reached a peak of 110 percent in 
1974, It eased to 5.8 percent in 1976, and 
now threatens to remain in "double digits." 

Unfortunately for the average citizen, the 
cure for this inflation may be more painful 
than the problem itself. 

President Caner has taken a few steps 
already to fight inflation. 



He has permitted an increase in imported 
beef to combat high beef prices caused by 
the recent herd liquidations. 



Tuition and fees wiil be 
going up again tit is year, 

but it's oniy part of ttie 
larger inflationary picture. 



recession is "unavoidable. ..That might 
mean a 7 percent unemployment rate for 
up to three years," he says, but "there is no 
other way." 




The president has increased the hiarvest 
on national forestland to ease the profit 
shortage in the lumber industry which has 
pushed up construction costs. 

Carter has agreed to scale back his pro 
posed $19 4 billion a year tax cut and has 
given the go ahead to trim another $3 
billion to $5 billion from federal expen- 
ditures in fiscal 1979 with the aim to shrink 
the budget deficit for fiscal 1979, currently 
projected at $53 billion This would subtract 
the resources for new jobs, federalization 
of welfare, urban rescue ar>d national 
health 

His major effort has been "jawboning" 
Labor ar>d Busing to hold down wage and 
price hikes. Carter's Special Trade 
Representative Robert Strauss successfully 
persuaded US Steel to roll back its 
$10 SO^perton hike to $5 50 per ton. 

Other anti-inflation measures are in *;ie of- 
fing. 

Carter has said he will hokl down to 5.5 
percent the forthcoming pay hike for 
federal white collar »vofkers. down from 
last year's 7 percent boost James Pierce, 
president of tho National Federation of 
Federal Employees has said it is "totally un- 
fair that the president is asking 3 percent of 
the working men and women to carry the 
load for the rest of the country " 



Carter is under fire from Labor for other 
re^ons too. 



At the recommendation of Charles L. 
Schultze, chairman of the Council of 
Economic Advisers and Barry Bosworth, 
director of the Council on Wage & Price 
Stability, Carter may relax industry stan- 
dards designed to protect textile workers 
from "brown lung" disease, an em- 
physematic respiratory disorder caused by 
exposure to cotton dust. 



Labor has also made it clear that it has no 
US» for any deceleration program since its 
leaders believe thiat any program will have 
n>ore impact on wages than prices. Said 
one top AFL-CIO staffer, "Deceleration 
that's wfwn U.S. Steel rolls back a price in- 
crease from $10 50 to $5 50 when it should 
have been $4 or less m tf>e first place." 

In any case, it Carter does not keep a lid 
on inflation Federal Reserve Chairman G. 
William Miller has threatened to tighten up 
credit so severely that a recession might 
result. Tf>eAdministrationappearsresigned. 
"We weren't born yesterday," says a 
senior hand "if tfiere's got to be a recession 
to keep a handle on this economy, then it 
better be early next year tf^n later." 
William Fellner of the American Enterprise 
Institute, a member of Ricf>ard fsJixon's 
Council of Economic Advisers has said a 



Will a recession cure inflation? It may ease 
it somewhat but as Joel Popkin of the Na- 
tional Bureau of Economic Research 
discovered, inflation is so deeply imbedded 
that it can not even be slowed by a deep 
recession. His findings, using a three hun- 
dred equation model of the U.S. economy 
and its pricing mechanisn^, confirm the 
impressions that prices are for the most 
part unresponsive to demand conditions, 
especially in the consumer goods in 
dustries. Wages are nx)st responsive to 
changes in Consumer Price Index and re- 
cent rate of wage increases in other in- 
dustries, he found. 



In rrwst cases, neither the unemployment 
rate nor tf>e demand for workers within ths 
industry has any effect on wages. Arthur 
Okun, chief adviser to Lyndon Johnson, 
has said "You get so little deflation from 
recessions now that it's like burning down 
your house to bake a loaf of bread " 



"^••9' 



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PETE SEEGER 


June 16 f 17 f M89 

^ m78 


A CHORUS OF 2000 

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JUNE 15, 1978 
8:OOPM 

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By B STEPHANIE RICHARDSON 

The Leonard Bernstein Festival of 
American Music, a three week Fine Arts 
Center presentation, will offer the gamut of 
musical experiences from work, to 

workshops, to pleasure with the efforts of 
major guest artists, said David Letters, 
festival director of public relations. 

Over 100 student jobs have been 
generated by the festival's stage produc 
tions of "West Side Story" and "Trouble in 
Tahiti" as well as openings in the festival 
orchestra itself Workshops led by faculty 
with the f>elp of several of the performing 
artists, plus just being a member of the au 
dience ate also among the opportunities of 
fered 

The festival, which runs from June 29 to 
July 23 and features the works of 
Massachusetts bred Bernstein, will include 
performances from symphony to ja// by 
The Hartford Ballet, ja/jr artist Maynard 
Ferguson and his 13 piece orchestra: the 
Thad Jones Mel Lewis Quartet: conductor, 
pianist and composer Lukas Foss: me?/o 
soprano soloist Florence Quivar: Woody 
Herman and The Young Thundering Herd: 
ti.e Buddy DeFranco Quartet, and violinist 
Eugene Fodor. 

Participating in the workshops will be 
Lukas Foss, ja// clarinetist Buddy DeFran- 
co and the Thad Jones Mel Lewis Quartet 
with Larry Willis piano, Rufus Reed bass, 
and Mel Lewis percussion According to 
Letters, workshop enrollment, which is still 
taking place through the office of Continu 
•ng Education in Hasbrouck. has already 
been sufficient to cover faculty and 
operating costs 

Summer Session Director Alan Ashton 



had hoped that summer enrollment would 
be boosted by the festival, but according to 
Judy Johnston, Summer Session Office 
manager, this year's enrollment now totals 
2,193 compared with last year's 3,660. 

"This IS due mainly to the costs of educa 
lion: financial aid is down this summer, and 
laeople are getting summer jobs instead of 
going to school, Ashton said. 

The festival has a working budget of 
$200,000, with $100,000 expected from 
ticket sales. Letters said Additional finan 
cial support for the festival has come from 
donors '"who wish to remain anonymous" 
There are close to 60 students in the 
festival orchestra that are all getting a sti 
pend. Letters said Many of them are 
from Massachusetts, but auditions were 
held in Amherst. Boston and New York " 

Eight student dancers selected by com 
petitive audition will be participating as 
well Most of these are UMass students or 
alumni. Letters said 

He estimated that an additional 35 
students had been hired for ushering, as 
well as 25 on the production staff. 

JoAnn Murray, Class of '79 major in 
Dance, who was hired by Fine Arts Center 
stage manager Susan Van Dyke to work on 
the festival, said of her summer job: "It's a 
lot of carpentry work, fun. and I like the 
people a lot You really do learn skills in 
stead of just pushing a broom. If you have 
any interest and initiative people wil re 
spend and teach you things." 

One of the things she is being taught is 
how to help construct the temporary stage 
now in progress on the east bank of the 
Campus Center Pond The stage is being 
set up for functions such as the "Toward 
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Collegian 




Leonard Bernstein. 



sorT>etime after which it will be the site of 
public, open air rehearsals of the festival's 
individual groups These groups include 
string quartets and string and brass choirs 

They II run all day, said Letters 

Letters estimates a maximum attendance 
at the festival would consist of 20,000 peo 
pie This IS based on the Fine Arts Center 
Concert Hall capacity, and that of its 
Be/anson Recital Hall, with a capacity of 
220 

The 7 performances of Bernstein's only 
opera. "Troutjie in Tahiti, " will take place in 
the Be/anson Recital Hall. In Bernstein's 
words, the opera is "a light weight piece 
^'•" whole thing is popular song inspired 



and lis r«,ols are in musical comedy or. 
even belter, ihe American musical 
ftieatre " 
Whether or not the festival becomes an 
annual University event will depend on how 
niany people attend, the community's sup 
port, and where the people are coming 
from. Letters said The festival's three sym 
phf,nir events were schedule coordinated 
with T.inglewood's so as not to offer similar 
prrtqrams on competing nights, he said, ad 
dinq. We re the little h ids on the block ' 

The Fine Arts Center is in its third year, 
«rir| It was 12 years m construction, ' Let 
tfrs saifl "Nr»w that we have it, we're try 
inn ir. li^f. .t Hs tnnr.h as possif)le" 



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® Colle gian. 



i^ Commonwealth Stage 



Wednesday, June 14 1979 



COIMT. FROM PAGE 2 
going," he stressed 

The Man in Charge 
Throughout our conversation Knauf 
spoke with obvious pride and enthusiasm 
about the evolution of theatre at UMass 
since his arrival. Although plagued by shor- 
tages of money and a staff which is still 
small, Knauf has managed to keep things 
under control; much of the progress is the 
result of his own initiative. 

On one side of the coin, it is clear that I 
have initiated and instigated a lot of the 
change that has occurred and a great deal 
of change has occurred since 72," he 
reflected, but was quick to add that "those 
kinds of changes simply couldn't take place 
without the full support of the faculty " 

It IS possible that I coerced them into a 
point of view, but closer to the truth is that 
we've been willing to sit down and talk and 
talk and talk we're really doing this by 
mutual agreement, " he emphasized 
The growth of the department depends 
upon this spirit of cooperation within itself 
but also requires support from the UMass 
administration which, according to Knauf, 
IS not always responsive. He told us that 
there is not a tremendous amount of sup 
port " for theatre above the level of the pro 
vost s office, but "not in a negative sense 
It s just a kind of lethargy, like this rock that 
you have to somehow move or dodge or 
get around. .' 

His department has many expenses that 
come out of trust funds rather than state 
monies, so Knauf is often called upon to 
deal with administrators to obtain funds. 
His remedy to the lethargy he encounters is 
■ beating on their doors, talking to 
them They help out when you scream 
loud enough, and otherwise do not take a 
very active hand in the matter 

Education and Entertainment 
One source of funding for the theatre 
department is. of course, box office 
revenue. The University Ensemble Theatre 
stages several productions each season in 
the Rand and the smaller Curtain theatres 
in the Fine Arts Center, but ticket sales are 
not a major consideration when the 
season's lineup of plays is selected by the 
department 

I have insisted as a policy that we choose 
our seasons for educational purposes. " 
Knauf said most emphatically Then it is 



my job. back behind the scenes, to see that 
we get enough money to do those shows. 
And I've consistently done that." 

Shows are selected because certain 
students in the department are at levels of 
experience where they require new and 
stimulating stage experiences The result is 
sometimes "fairly heavy programming " 
and an occasional "lopsided season" ac 
cording to Knauf, but compromises in the 
selection are not made in terms of public 
appeal. He speculated that it may be one 
reason that University Ensemble plays do 
not get as much student attendance as he 
thinks they should. 

"It is too easy in this day and age to have 
something which looks awfully popular but 
IS a piece of trash, " he said. "But a produc 
tion which is artistically successful and has 
also found a way to reach an audience is 
the ideal situation No matter how brilliant' 
a play might be, if no one likes it then the 
purpose hasn't been served." 

The public ineimiiao 
Although Knauf would like to see more 
students in the audience he says that atten- 
dance has been good at University Ensem 



ble Theatre productions. The Flr>e Arts 
Center Concert Hall productions are 
separate from his own stage productions 
but Knauf says they provide a boost never- 
theless "We've always been of the opinion 
that the more that is going on, the more 
people will come, " he said, and the influx 
of people to the concert hall results in big- 
ger audiences for the Rand Theatre also, 

Knauf said he would like to learn more 
about the makeup of UMass audiences in 
particular, and had this to say about theatre 
goers in general: 

"The day is over when the theatre belongs 
almost exclusively to the well to-do, or 
what we call the 'the blue haired ladies set.' 
That day is just simply over. I don't believe, 
however, that the theatre will become a 
totally o^ss media, as was predicted in the 
sixties... There are certain kinds of theatre 
which will appeal to a larger mass, to be 
sure, but my experience tells me that 
theatrical art is so complex that rK>t 
everyone, few of the poorly educated, can 
deal with it." Many tfieatre pieces require a 

TURN TO PAGE 9 



W 



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■Colle qign 9 



CONT FROM PAGE 8 

"finely tuned sensibility to understand what 
IS going on, and therefore you have already 
limited your audience to a certain extent " 
he said 

Poorty Informed 

One element of every opening night au- 
dience IS the local press and Knauf sug 
gested that the area's critics could use a lot 
of improvement. "Every time we have a 
series of reviews for a production they 
cause us to lament the fact that there seem 
to be few, if any, informed critics in the 
valley people who really know about the 
theatre and have some intelligent way of 



cnttcizing," he told us with an air of 
resignation. 

"Even when we get a set of positive 
reviews, he continued, "they are usually 
deficient in many ways. They lack insight 
they don't seem to understand how the 
theatre works ...Obviously you've got to 
fiave response and the media is one kind of 
response.-, but it does always suprise us that 
the average response we get from the 
media is so poorly informed" 
Pfunge Ahead 
Critics and other interested people will be 
returning to the Fine Arts Center very soon 
for the opening of the Commonwealth 
btage season and for the Leonard Bern 



- -' -• ^- — -^" «"u <yji irie Leonaro Bern 

Am ram unites Latin 8- 



stem Festival of American fy/1usic, Knauf 
pondered the effects of the Festival upon 
the Commonwealth Stage: the Bernstein 
Festival, he thinks, needs s larger audienc* 
to. succeed than will be available this sum 
mer, and its organizers have made a 'con 
si(;lerable over estimate of the avaHabte 
population during the summer " 

'Now that's |ust a prediction, " he cau 
tioned But in a sense, that's all right too. 
because we didn'.t last summer 
either Sometimes you have to plunge 
ahead, you have to take a chance. And i1 
there is enough audience here to make this 
work, terrific, because it just brings in more 
people" 



David Amram 

H avana / IM evw Y ork 

Flying Fish 



Reviewed by KEN SHAIN 



Further cementing bonds of friendship 
between American and Cuban peoples is 
David Amram's latest return from hiatus 
Havana New York, on Flying Fish Records! 
Uniting Latin and jazz musical sytles 
Amram incorporates American and Cubari 
musicians in documenting, in sound, the 
historic reunion of the two cultures last 
year Though not fashionably electric 
Havana /New York is true to the spirit of 
\azz and succeeds in making music not 
politics, the star. 

One side, recorded live in Havana during 
the famous reunion between American jazz 
masters and their Cuban nxjsical counter 
parts last May, is entitled "En Memoria de 
Chano Pozo. " and features the talents of 
multi instrumentalist Amram, Cuban 
trumpet player Arturo Sandoval, fax- 



pphonist Paquito de Hivera, and the 
famous Cuban percussion group, Los 
Papines. Also featured in the inspiiinq 
Manilla' L^»'"^'^«""" ^^ug^ P'aye^Ra? 
The other side consists of three composi 
^ons recorded in New York during Los 
Papines June tour of the States Joining 
Amram and Los Papines \ot the title track 
ThoH . '^ °^ Papines" are trumpet player 
JI^ r^"*'^'.^''°P^°"'S» Pepper Adams 
and Cuban electric violinist Alfredo de la 
»-e Ray Mantilla lends a hand and Cuban 
percussionist Candido joins the group on 
Broadway Reunion, " a tune recorded live 
on the corner of Broadway and 42nd St 

Definitely recommended to music 
po itics, or history buffs, this disc will not 
only amaze you and your friends with its 
spirit and vibrancy, but will captivate you 
with Its good will. Flying Fish Records 
known for their blue grass releases has 
outdone themselves on this one; they've hit 
the mainstream with a vanguard musically 
unknown to these shores for the last 17 
years. 



jazz music 




David Anrram. 




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Collegian. 



Marley rouses crowd 
in Boston concert 



Bob Marley and the Wailars 
Music Hall Boston 
Thursday. June 8 

Reviewed by KEN SHAIN 

Finishing off a thoroughly rousing show 
this past Thursday evening at Boston's 
Musk: Hall with an encore longer than Elvis 
Costelio's entire 37 minute set here earlier 
this year was Bob Marley and the Wallers 
In their first out of two engagements here 
in Massachusetts this tour (the second to 
be LenoKS Music Inn on June 18), the 
ever popular reggae bnd played for r>early 
two hours before an enthusiastic sell out 
crowd in making the second show of the 
evening truly one of the memorable musical 
events of the season 

Opening the show for the Waiters with a 
40 mir.ute set of pop-flavored rock'n soul 
music were the newly reformed Imperials 
Recently regrouped without former lead 
sirM)*r Little Anthony, the band has in 



ment Bob Marley would enter on stage and 
transform everyone there from spectators 
into witnesses. 

In no hurry himself to promote his new 
album, Kaya, Bob entered the Hall amidst 
thundering applause and openedwithastring 
of songs from prior releases, indicating his 
pleasure and satisfaction with his older 
material. Not until the audience had been 
treated to such songs as "Burnin' and 
Lootin," Crazy Baldhead, " and "Them 
Belly Full. as well as a cleverly 
choreographed and stage lit "Rebel Music 
(3 O'clock Road Block)." were they allowed 
to sample some of the new material On 
their feet and dancing from the first note 
on, the audience responded enthusiastical 
ly to the new material as Bob integrated 

"Crieie." "Running Away, " and "Kaya " 
with 'Lively Up Yourself," 'I Shot the 
Sheriff," and "Jamming." 

After a tumultous 10 minute standing ova 
tion and a grand plea for more, Marley 
returned to play a rocking and extensive en 
core, bnnging the Hall to a fever pitch of 



Arts/Music 



corporated instrumental textures to its 
trademark harmonies, allowing rear- 
rangements of classics such as "Goin' Out 
Of My Heed " to acquire a new ar>d distinct 
sound tn performance Also included m the 
new Imperials repertoire is a souped up ver 
sion of Stevie Wonder's "Saturn.' as well 
as some new and ongtr^al material availabte 
on their forthcoming album, their first new 
r a laa aa m years 
Politely applaudmg the Imperials' effort 
and patiently waitir^g out the fifteen 
rmnutea it took to amm tt>e stage for 
Marley's entrance, the audtanca daany was 
in no hurry, everyone thare, from born 
again RaaTaman to tt>e stauncf>ett rock- 
cntica in the houae. knew tt^t at any rTH>- 



excitement Always one to outdo himself, 
Marley performed an encore set that made 
believers out of the last hold outs in the 
house Opening with "War, " a polemic 
against racial injustice and a vow to fight 
'till Its finish, the Waiters moved right into 
an extended version of "Get Up Stand 
Up. " exorting the crowd not to tet down its 
guard in the face of nwunting reaction co 
the gams of social progress Finishing the 
encore set with an "Exodus" jam, the band 
exited teaving a satisfied crowd in the 
throes of its own applause. 
Clearly, history was made as the Wailers 
made their triumphant return to 
Massachusetts setting the stage for a new 
era of creative musical development. 



Fo Ik concert s tars 
UMass m usiclan s 



By MARY KINNEAVY 

The Southwick lr>n in rural Southwick, 
Mass came aiive laet weekend as half a 
dofan taiantad folk musicians, including 
three UMaaa graduates, delighted an un- 
Miapacting audwnce 

Because the converted old country house 
has more the atrrK>sphere of an English 
tavern than of a low keyed coffeehouse, 
the crowd tends to be a bit boisterous until 
Its attention « captured The music of 
Wendy Schwer, John Shibley and their 
friends accomplished that easily Their in- 
formal style encourages audience participa- 
tion and by the end of the evening per 
formers and listeners were unified by this 
interaction. 



The first set of the evining was played by 
Wendy Schwer, guitarist and singer, and 
Nancy Mills, also doing. vocals Their music 
consisted mostly of light, contemporary 
folk songs, harmonized in their own style of 
pretty simplicity Nancy also plays various 
percussion instruments including tarn 
bounne and an occasional number on the 
spoons 



John Shibley then took the stage tu give 
the members of the audience their first 
taste of this multi talented musician's ap 
peal John performed a variety of types of 
folk tunes, ranging from blues to ballads to 
whimsical ditties Two favorites were Hud 
die Ledbetter's classic "Midnight Special" 
and the contemporar> "Up on Cnpple 
Creek " by "the boys in The Band " 



John's ability as a songwnter should not 
go unnoticed as his own compostions com 
prise the rnost memorable portion of many 
Of his performances. He weaves intricate 
music and powerful lyncs into songs which 
swell emotion and teave the listener haun- 
tingly reflective. 

In a later set, John calted upon two friends 
in the audience, Wayne Burns and Vin Mit 
chell, to )Oin the other musicians. Together 
they entertained with a number of »ollicking 
tunes which added to the high spirited at- 
mosphere 

The evening ended on a softer note with a 
•at of peaceful melodies including rernji- 



tions of Jackson Browne ar>d Judy Collins' 
ballads, leaving some folks hungry for more 
but with a promise of a chance to hear it. 

John Shibley ana wenoy Schwer will be 
performing at the Southwick Inn Friday and 
baturday nights through June for anyone 
who enjoys personabte surroundings and 
good music 



Deerfield Drive- In Theatre 



June 16-18 
KiRk OouqlAS 




D A Vid C ARRAdJNC 

& Kate J AcksoM 




• T? MtMrrNtiiMf »<->t 

Showtime Dusk(8:40) 



Wednesday June 14 1978 



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"Thank God It's Friday" 
Reviewed by MAR/0 A. BARROS 

Coming in the wake of "Saturday Night 
Fever," "T.G.I F." can be easily mistaken 
as "Hollywood goes to the Disco, Pt. II." 
Contrary to popular belief (and hope), this 
isn't the case. "Fever's" case study of the 
stud's role in the disco is no more a picture 
of the current disco scene than its 
gunslinger in the saloon and gangster-in- 
the speakeasy ancestors. While "Fever" 
was a rehash of a tried and true story line 
and character applied to the disco scene, 
"T.G.I.F." IS a much more accurate depic- 
tion of the scene that's imposed upon by 
Tony Manero. 

The movie's pace is quick and jogs along 
with very few resting spots. No one 



the Leatherman dances across car root- 
tops. 

The movie and its situations are cute and 
entertaining. The soundtrack is designed to 
punctuate these rather than to build a 
character. For example, the lost equipment 
man, Floyd, wanders in search of the Zoo 
disco to the Cameo classic, "Find My 
Way." He has the equipment necessary for 
the Commodores to make a live ap- 
pearance at the Zoo and save good buddy 
and DJ Bobby Speed's neck. 

Speed is in every direction at once spin- 
ning discs and stalling the radio p>eopie with 
that nervous "I've been there before but 
didn't like it then either" savvy. How saving 
the Commodores' appearance is is ques- 
tionable, though. 

Summer F)erforms "Last Dance" with 
much more feeling and vivacity. This song 



Arts/ Movies 



character dominates the movie as the in- 
terweaving of the many plots make all the 
actors supporting actors. Donna Summer's 
debut benefits from this as she doesn't 
have to dominate the movie and up until 
her performance of the "Last Dance" 
number, she only occasionally sneaks into 
the spotlight. 

While the movie attempts to show all of 
disco's one-night stars and bit players, any 
stereotyping is relatively harmless when 
compared to its predecessor. Even the 
worst of cads have their weaknesses and 
have their soft underbellies (or their jaws in 
the case of the computer mis matched Gus 
and Shirley) belted at least once. 

The dancers outshine "Fever's" 
choreographed showroom dummies and 
no one figure clears the floor for a boring 
solo dance consisting of no more than 
cocksure struts and poses. In fact, 
"T.G.I.F" takes its soloist outside as Marv 



IS one of three written by the multi talented 
Paul Jabara. His lamentable and 
sublemated "Trapped In A Stairway " could 
possibly be the most accessible pop hit on 
the soundtrack. The title number is an Alec 
R Costandinos effort performed by Love & 
Kisses that has the release of Friday nite 
while the other sides are fair to middlin'. 

All in all. "T.G.I F." is much more ac- 
curate than "Saturday Night Fever " as a 

Disco Movie " The action never stops and 
with no stud to follow or no real "star" to 
play up, we meet more people and feel 
touched by more aspects of the disco life. 
Rather than be told that gays are queers 
without ever actually seeing one, we meet 
at least one gay couple who are no more 
bi/arre than anyone else in the show. 

Casablanca Records & Filmworks has 
done well to give us a slice of the disco 
scene that their music and artists have 
dominated and helped shape. 



let the rest 




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■Wednesday, June 21 1978 




The Boston Arts Group Lunchtime 

Theatre will present two comedies, "The 
Dock Brief and "The Grand Vizier" 
tonight at 8 p m. in the Campus Center 
Auditorium. 

The Dock Brief," by John Mortinr>er, 
depicts the antics of a philosophical wife- 
slayer and his bumbling, inefficient lawyer. 

"The Grand Vizier" was written by one of 
France's best but least-known absurdists, 
Rene De Obaldia, and translated by 
Nicholas Linfield Directed by Linfield, one 
of the founders of the Boston Arts Group 
Lunchtime Theatre, "The Grand Vizier" is 
actually a play within a play. 

During their Summer Arts Hostel residen- 
cy, the Boston Arts Group will teach 
'Theat»!r Improvisation Workshop" and 

'Explo'ing Theater " The troupe will return 
to the University on July 12 for another per- 
formance. 

The plays are sponsored by the University 
Summer Activities Office in co-operation 
with the Arts Extension Service Admission 
IS 50 cents with a Summer Session ID.; $1 
for senior citizens and children; and $2 for 
the general pubhc Hostel participants will 
be admitted free of charge. 



tIieatre 



The Mount Holyoke College Summer 
1 neatre has anno'inced its 1978 season. All 
li'ortiicltons take place in The Festive Tent, 
I theatre in the r »und on the Mt Holyoke 
campus, off Rte 1 16. 

This • ummef s presentations are: 
The Norman Conquests, by Alan 
Ayi khoiirne. July 4 thru 8 
Tobacco Road, hy Jack Kirkland, July 11 

thni 15 

The Pfijladelphia Story, by Phillip Barry, 

July 18 thru 22 

Bell Book and Candle, by John van 

n .-n. July ?5 thru 29 

That Championship Season, l)y Jason 

Miller, Auqust 1 ;hni 5 

Don Juan in Hell, by George Bernard 

Sti.iw AiKjiist^P thru 12 

Two Gentlemen of Verona, by William 

Shakesperire, August 15 thru 19 

For children (matinees); 
King of the Ice Cream Mountain, June 
27lhrii July 1 
The Invisible Dragon, July 26 thru 29 

AduM - k.ts are $3, $4, and $5; students, 
senior cm/ens and children's tickets are $1 . 
Season tickets .ire $24,00 Tickets are 



available at the door, or at The Lab Theatre 
on the Mt Holyoke campus 
For more informatir n call 538 2406. 



CONCERTS 



The ninth season of "Twilight Concerts on 
the lawn" at The Music Inn in Lenox, 
Mass will feature \<ir/ artists Roy Ayers & 
Ubiqurty and The Crus. ^'ts in an after 
noun concert U»is Sur y at 3;30 p.m 
Tickets ar»; ,./ m adv ce and $8 a» the 
drxir Tickets are av.' ibie at Ticketron and 
F;i( tjsof Earth in Anherst Center. 

Mso performing at The Musil: Inn this 
s H'ltner will be: 

Pablo Cruise. ui(i Marc Jordan July 9 
John Prine, Jeny Jeff Walker and 
Jonathiin EdwBrds July 15 
John Luc Ponty and John McLaughlin 
July 23 

New Riders and Richie Furay .July 30 
David Bromberg, Muddy Waters, and 
Tracy Nelson Auqusi 19 
Bonnie Raitt August 27 

The Twilight Concerts on the Lawn" 
series will soon be announcing eight more 
concerts. 



CONCERTS 

The 1978 Tanglewood Popular Artists 
series begins July 3, at the Tanglewood 
grounds in Lenox, Mass., with a concert by 
Seals ft Crofts and Kenny Loggins. 

Other concerts for this summer include: 
Keith Jarrett July 4 

Willie Nelson and Emmyk>u Harris - July 
18 

jacksone Browne August 15 
Peter, Paul and Mary August 22 
Gordon Lightfoot September 1 
George Benson September 3 

Other artibib and other dates to be an- 
nounced. 



filiM 



MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 



VOLUME V, ISSUE 4 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21, 1978 

O 




Sl(Nk-ni N«ws|Wi|i.i ol ilM I niv.rN.lx ul M.iss.m hi.MUs Mnlit rsi Ms <»|,mm I4| |i -.4-. i% 



UNI 



Emanuelle (The Joys of a Woman) will be 
shown Tuesday night at 7:30 and 9:15 in 
the Campus Center Auditorium. Admission 
is free. The film is sponsored by the Sum- 
mer Session Film Series. 




Wednesday, June 21, 1978, 



After month's protest 



■<?o»ggiim 



Faculty turns in withheld grades 



By MARK LECCESE 

Two representatives from the 
Massachusetts Society of Professors 
yesterday carried a cardboard Coca Cola 
box filled with faculty grade records into 
the Whitmore administration building and 
turned them over to the Registrar. 

The grade records were those of the 270 
faculty members who had been 
withholding 10,000 grades from the ad 
minstration for nearly a month in protest of 
the on going faculty contract talks. 

The tactic of withholding undergraduate 
grades was used by the MSP, the union 



representing the faculty in their bid for their 
first collective bargaining contract, to get 
the administration back to the bargaining 
table after negotiations broke off in mid 
May, according to MSP vice president 
John H Bracey. Jr 

"When we began this strategy, we were 
not negotiating at all The administration 
came back to the table as a result of this 
and bargaining has been fast and furious 
ever since," said Bracey, who carried the 
grades into Whitmore. 

"We withheld the grades to get the ad 
ministration back to the bargaining table 
not lust to hold indefinitely. It was a 



Fair for tomorrow 
a throw-back to past 



By LAURA KENNEY 

It seems that anyone with an eye toward 
the future also would have to have an eye 
toward the past, or so one would think in 
viewing l^st weekend's third annual 
Toward Tomorrow Fair 

Many exhibitors at the fair displayed 
"alternative li'estyles" which were based 
on the simple life of those in the "old 
days." Health food, woodburning stoves 
and hand made garments seem to be the 
answer to our modern-day problems 

In addition to such old fashioned items, 
five windmills were displayed, along with 
1 1 geodesic domes of varying sizes and 
fabrics, several solar furnaces and stoves 
and even solar powered watches possibly 
new tangled versions of the sundiaP 

According to fair director Rick Taupief, 
total figures for attendance were around 
18,000, noticeably less than last year's 
crowd of about 25.000 Weather over the 




weekend was inconsistent, possibly ex 
plaining the lower attendance. Clouds 
threatened ram all day Saturday, and Sun 
day brought muggy, overcast weather with 
the sun breaking through in the afternoon. 

Touring the fairgrounds located around 
the campus pond, one saw sprinkled 
among the exhibits a profuse array of food 
stands, ranging from pizza and fried dough , 
to fruit cup and granola, lending to the car 
nival atmosphere of the fair. 

Bagels tor I omorrow" were sold, and 
fairgoers had the opportunity to try various 
foods coolfed using solar heat at the 
"Solarchow ' booth The booth was forced 
to close down operations Saturday for lack 
of sun, but was back in business Sunday 
afternoon. 



Many in attendance commented on the 
high number of profit making organizations 
hawking their wares at the fair. Among 
these were a group selling Chir>ese sandals 
for $5 a pair and another group selling En 
vironments' record albums for the same 
price. These records were being played 
over a loudspeaker, some with birds chirp 
ing. others with wind blowing, while a man 
spoke in muffled tones through a 
microphone saying, "These records take 
you where you want to be," 

Political exhibits included a booth set up 
by the Clamshell Alliance, where a quilt 
was being made and 25 cent balloons were 
sold Information on next weekend's rally 
against the nuclear power plant in 
Seabrook. N.H was also handed out at the 
fair. 

Anx)ng some of the more "futuristic" 
displays was that of a geodesic dome 
shaped tent. Manufactured by Northface 
Company of California, a business which 
sells camping equipment. The star dome 
tent, a prototype of R Buckminster Fuller's 
geodesic dome, could sleep 12 people com 
fortably, according to exhibitors, and could 
be folded into a small pack weighing about 
85 pounds. 



Oispayed next to the star dome were the 
fly's eye dome and the turtle dome. The 
fly's eye dome, resembling a swiss cheese 
like structure, was a model for future hous 
ing. The large circles on the dome, ac 
cording to its exhibitor, had "different 
functions. One may be used as a sun roof, 
another for a window, etc." 



A presenter explained the domes saying, 
"Fuller developed the geometry; people are 
now implementing that with fiberglass and 
other materials which can t>e molded into 
dome like structures. This never could be 
done before. The domes as living quarters 
are a new experience f^r nf»onle 



Many childron were in attendance over 
the weekprid, several wearing ' Mo Nukes' 
tee shirts James Benton, 9. was wearing a 
shirt whose lettering read, "Solar 
Holograms" He explained solar holograms 
as 'three dimensional images projected on 
glass with lasers ' When asked why they 
were labelled as solar, James said, 'I sup 
pose it was the best thing they could think 
of. ' 



Music was everywhere at the fair, with 
Fine Arts Center concerts by folksingers 
Pete Seeger, Tom Paxton and Dave Van 
Ronk, free outdoor concerts by various 
area groups, and many performances by 
street musicians Among the latter was 
Stephen Baird from Boston, who enthralled 
hundreds of listeners Saturday on the steps 
of the Fine A Ms Center. 



One interesting performance dating bacl- 
to times past was that of the Northampton 
Morris, a group performing ancient dances 
to "make the crops grow. " as one dancer 
put it The group was accompanied by a 
violinist and flutist, and the dancers, both 
men and women, wore colorful costumes 
dating hack to Old English times. 



specific tactic for a specific purpose, and 
we accomplished our purpose, " Braacy 
said 

A contract agreement has not yet been 
reached, and bargaining is continuing be 
tween the faculty and the University ad 
ministration 

"I do not know and I do not think that the 
withholding of grades in any way related to 
the negotiations, " said James B Krumsiek, 
chairman of the UMass Board of Trustees' 
ad hoc Committee on Labor Relations. 
The withholding of grades "had no bear- 
ing directly on the bargaining effort. The 
University has always been prepared to 
bargain under any set of circumstances." 
Krumsiek said 

"I think It was clearly an illegal act and 
that the trustees were disappoin^d that the 
faculty would resort to that kind of tactic, ' 
Krumsiek said 

According to Bracey, the grade 
withholding action proved "the faculty is 
very important to the running of this 
University Some members of the ad 



ministration didn't think so. but tfie ' rulty 
IS vital You only have to make tl-.i noint 
once." 

"It we continue at the current p < . it is 
possible to have a contract by Js. i 30, ' 
Bracey said The state and the Un.versity 
fiscal year ends on June 30 

New grade reports including the newly 
turned in grades will be processedand mailed 
out to students within two weeks, ac 
cording to University Registrar Ralph D. 
Jones. 

Grade reports were mailed to students last 
week, using a spcial, non-punative (j'^ide in 
places where faculty grades were missing. 
The grade, which appeared as a "Y" on the 
grade reports, acted as a place hoi(t' r and 
did not affect a student's grade ave' je 

University officials estimated 10,00( out of 
90,000 undergraduate grades were 
withheld by the faculty Processmr^ and 
mailing an extra set of grade /er- :. will 
cost between $3,500 and $4,000. a. rding 
to Jones 

"We'll have to enter the nevk iradw 
manually," Jones said. 



Anti-nukers begin 
Seabrook rally Friday 



By LEE BURNETT 

Last Sunday at quarter of four more than 
twenty bicyclists left the Towards Torrxw- 
row Fairgrounds destined for Seabrook. 
New Hampshire. 
This marks the homestretch for local anti 
nuclear activists who have been organizing 
all year long for the demonstration to be 
held in Seabrook this weekend, in defiance 
of the embattled nuclear power plant there. 
The bikers will be followed by^ an 
estimated five hundred citizens from 
western Massachusetts who will rendez- 
vous Friday night in Seabrook along with 
thousands of otf>ers. 

On Saturday a n^rch led by local citizens 
IS planned along Route One to elicit added 
participation from tounsts converging on 
Seabrook that weekend. Organized in af- 
finity groups for the safety, discipline, and 
success of the demonstration, the par- 
ticipants will settle on an eighteen acre plot 
of Public Service Company property near 
the fenced-in construction site for a legal 
rally on Sunday Speakers that day will in- 
clude Amory Lovins, John Gofman and 
Sara Nelson, according to Hampshire 
County Alternative Energy Coalition. 
The planned action has been held in sway 
for the past three weeks as Clamshell 
Alliance organizers. Public Service Com- 
pany officials, and State of New Hampshire 
officials maneuvered for position on an 
event that has much at stake. As a result of 
this jockeying the nature of the action has 
changed. 

Originally an occupation restoration was 
planned whereby Clamshell people would 
illegally occupy Public Service Company 
property, attempt to restore the site by 
plantinc) seeds and seedlings as well as by 
setting up ir-nergy projects like solar ovens 
with which to cook. By committing civil 
disobediance. they hoped to bring atten 
tion to the greater danger posed by nuclear 
power 

Attorney General Thomas Rath proposed 
a legal rally on an 18 acre site where people 
could peaceably assemble and ♦hen leave 
after four days This proposal was originally 
rejected by the Clamshell then accepted 
when it became apparent that lor' '-■"'. 



owners would not allow their property to 
be used as a staging ground tor the oc- 
cupation. 

For the Public Service Company the up- 
coming rally is nothing but bad news. The 
Company prefers to conduct its business 
quietly and unnoticed. It has been a reluc- 
tant participant in the public debate over 
what they consider to be company 
prerogative On occasion they have even 
refused to be present in the same room as 
Clamshell negotiators. Added exposure 
could mean added delays tor them. 

For the state of New Hampshire the 
derTK)nstration promises to be a test of 
leadership for Governor Meldrim Thomp- 
son. The issue of nuclear power brings him 
out in full uniform. Last year, at a similar 
occupation as the one originally planned 
this year, Thompson jailed 1414 protestors 
tor a week in an effort to deter what he 
termed "lawlessness." He paid the price in 
adverse publicity and m the drain on state 
revenues necessitated by jailing 1414 peo- 
ple for a week. This y'ar Thompson hopes 
to regain public stature by swift decisive ac 
tion. 
The Clamshell has much at stake as well. 
The outcome of this rally will determine its 
political future. The Clamshell has resolute- 
ly stuck to an organizing model that has as 
its cornerstone consensus decision- 
making, and grass-roots fundraising. 
Western Mass. efforts are illustrative of 
Clamshell organizing techniques. They 
have sponsored movies, contra dancers, 
benefit concerts, and straightforward can- 
vassing. 

One of the problems being grappled with 
is how to stop nuclear power through non 
violent civil disobedience and n the mean 
time maintain local support from citizens 
who may frown on civil disobedience. The 
recent withdrawal of landowner approval is 
iiirjicative of this problem. 
If fewer people turn out for the 
demonstration than expected, the Clam 
shell Alliance will have to take a long hard 
look at its present r)urpose. On 'he other 
hand a large turnout could sustain the 
momentum for grander plans. 
The demonstration is open to the public. 




A memi)er of the Clamshell Alliance stitches a quilt that is made up of 
patches shaped like clams at last weekend s Toward Tomorrow Fair. The 
Clamshell Alliance is planning to stage a demonstration this weekend in 
Seabrook, N.H.. in protest of the building of a nuclear power plant there, 
(photo by Madeline Fusile) ^ 



\»[lr>Jicin, 



Wednesday, June 21. 1978, 



.Colle gian 



Knapp: a big job ahead 



By LAURA KENNEY 



Newly elected UMass President David C 
Knapp will come to the University m 
September facing a ship with virtually no 
crew 

Most of the top administrators at all three 
UMass campuses have left or are soon 
leaving their posts, including Boston 
Chancellor Carlo L. Golino, who left in 
January and was replaced by Interim 
Chancellor Claire Van Ummersen Amherst 
Chancellor Randolph W Bromery. who last 
March announced he would leave next 
June, and most recently Worcester 
Medical School Chancellor Roger C 
Bulger, who will leave in December 

Several positions in the central admmistra 
tion m Boston are also vacant, including 
that of budget director and vice president 
for management, a position which will be 
vacated next month by Kathenne H Han 
son Vice President for Wanning Nan S 



News AWAlysis 



The new president will have his 



hands full as he enters 



a university of departing administrators 




School grew, causing Wood to move the 
pr»?sidents office from Amherst to central 
headquarters in Boston in 1970 

The University is still in transition, not only 
because of the influx of administrators, but 
also because of the growing number of 
students seeking a public university educa 
tion. Competition is becoming keener, 
costs are going up, and faculty members 
are demanding higher salaries 

In order to keep quality faculty at UMass, 
salaries will have to remain competitive 
with other public and private institutions. 
Knapp said he is m favor of pay raises for 
this reason, and will hopefully work to im 
plement the increases Meanwhile, 
students are worrying about tuition in- 
creases which may limit many people's ac 
cess to higher education. 

Because of the state of the economy, 
Knapp will have much on his hands wheii 
he arrives It is hoped that he will be able to 
add new life and consistency to the Univer 
sity's staff and to its goals 



Former UMass Presidem Robert C. Wood. 



Robinson has also left her job. 
Here on the home front, the Amherst 
campus will soon be without vice 
chancellors, as Acting Vice chancellor for 
Student Affairs Roben L. Woodbury leaves 
next week, and Vice chancellor for Budget 
and Finance James L McBee leaves next 
month In addition, a replacement for Pro- 
vost and Vice chancellor for Academic Af- 
fairs Paul L Puryear is being sought. 
Puryear was fired last January, and 
Jeremiah M Allen has been acting vice 
chancellor and provost since that time 
Most of the departing administrators are 
leaving for other jobs in higher education. 
Bulger wilt become president of tne Health 
Science Center at the Univerfity of Texas, 
and Hanson will become executive director 
of the Consortium on Financing Higher 
Education 

McBee is leaving for a position as dean at 
Potomac State College in West Virginia, 
Woodbury w.»H stay on here as a faculty 
member in the School of Education, and 
Bromery is uncertain about his future 
plans He will probably take a job in private 
industry. 

Perhaps the vacancies in the University's 
leadership positions will prove an ad 
vantage to Knapp, who is coming in from 
his post as provost at Cornell University in 



Ithaca, N.Y. In an interview last month, 
Knapp admitted that he knows little about 
Massachusetts or about the University, but 
that he would be "studying up" over the 
summer 

Because of his limited past involvement 
with the state and the school, Knapp may 
be able to take a more objective view of 
budget and personnel problems, thus len 
ding new ideas and solutions. 
Yet tli6re is also a problem with the fact 
that there will be few long time UMass ad- 
ministrators around, in that anyone Knapp 
brings in will have to start anew, "studying 
up ' before really getting down to business 
Meanwhile, the University may suffer in 
such a transitional period. 

The University has been in trar>sition for 
quite some time, especially in light of the 
fact that It has grown so tremendously in 
just the past decade When Robert C 
Wood stepped m as president in 1970, 
there was a total of 18,887 students at the 
Amherst campus, and when he stepped 
down from his position last January, 23,593 
students were enrolled at the same cam 
pus 
And during Wood's term, the Graduate 
Research Center, the library and the Fine 
Arts Center were erected in Amherst Tf>e 
Boston campus and the Worcester Medical 




UMass President elect David C Knapp. 



Chapel still closed 
for roof repairs 

The Old Chapel, closed early last week for 
repairs to damaged roof trusses, will be 
closed for another 10 days, according to a 
Physical Plant official 

Director of the Department of En 
vironmental Health and Safety Donald A. 
Robinson last week told the Collegian that 
the wooden roof trusses of the chapel were 
deteriorating from water seepage. Robin 
son IS currently out of town and could not 
be reached for comment on the delay of 
repairs 

The repairs, which were to be made last 
week according to Robinson, will be done 
by Aquadro and Ceruti of Northampton 

Old Chapel offices have temporarily been 
moved to room 263 in the Fine Arts Center 

-LAURA KENNEY 

Women's commission 
receives documents 

The Chancellor's Commission on Women's 
News in the Collegian has received 
documents from both sides concerning 
the history of the dispute. 

The commission has also received written 
statements from central participants in the 
controversy, and will be calling witnesses 
to give oral testimony 

Questionnaires have been sent out to 60 
persons approximately 30 from each side 
of the dispute. 

Beginning with the September 1977 
issues, each issue of the Collegian will be 
examined by researchers with an eye to 
determining the amount.of space devoted 
to news in which women were treated 
significantly, relative to over all news 
coverage. 

The commission was set up after a group 
of women occupied the offices of the 
Collegian for 12 days last semester pro- 




lacK of coverage of 



testing the paper s 
women's news 

The commission is due to issue non- 
binding recommendations to both sides on 
September 1, 1978 

UMass grad wins 
broadcast award 

Former WMUA station manager and 1977 
UMass graduate Charles J Pellett won the 
Massachusetts Associated Press "Enter 
prise Reporting " award in the small station 
cataqory for 1977. 

Pellett, 22, who works for radio station 
WHMP in Northampton, won the award for 
a half hour documentary he did in 
December of 1977 about a 53 year old 
veteran who lived for seven years in a tent 
in the woods of Easthampton. 

WHMP AM, broadcasts at 1000 watts 
during the day and 250 watts at night 
WHMP FM broacasts at 3000 waits. 

Pellett served as station manager for 
WMUA, the UMass campus radio station, 
from June 1976 to June 1977 

•MARK LECCESE 



Outage darkens 
east end of campus 

A power outage occurred early Monday 
evening throughout the east end of the 
UMass campus, caused by a "failing 
ii<ir.c*ormer, ' according to University Elec 
trical Engineer Lawrence B. Perry, Jr 

Electricity was out in the graduate 
research towers. Engineering East the 
Campus Center, and the Northeast 



Residential Area for about 90 minutes, dur- 
ing which lime a thunderstorm took place. 
Perry said the storm "may have had some 
effect on the outage. " 

Perry also said there .vas a smaller power 
outage on Saturday afternoon because 
another transformer failed 

He said the exact cause of the failures is 
uncertain. We'll be having some 
transformer people come in to check the 
units out later this week, " Perry said 

LAURA KENNEY 



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Bob Marley at the Music inn in Lenox Marley and the Waiters pisysd to 
s capacitv audience last Sunday and turned in an outstarKing per- 
fomvncs. (photo by EdMsrd Cohan) 

SGA officials probe 
music fest finances 



By MARK LECCESe 

A meeting to begin looking into expen- 
ditures rrtade for thisspnng's Duke Ellington 
Music Festival will be held by the 
Undergraduate Student Senate treasurer's 
office this Thursday. 

"It's a meeting to get our facts straight 
from all the different people involved, and 
to decide if any further action is 
necessary, " said Michael Doyle, the senate 
treasurer. 

The concert vwas held on May 6. in Alumni 
Stadium, and was billed as a benefitfor the 
Duke Ellington Center in New York. El 
lington's son, Mercer, led the Duke El- 
lington Orchestra in one of the day's per 
formances 

The festival was budgeted at $44,880 by 
the Student Senate, according to Robert 
Dion, Student Government Association co- 
prestdent. 

Expenditures totalled $51,15996, 
however, according to Dion. Dion said that 
the expected revenues from the concert 
would only total a little more than $4000 

Senate treasurer Michael Doyle said that 
one of the purposes of the Thursday 
meeting will be to determine a final figure 



on exactly now much money was spent on 
the concert 

Many figures have been quoted, some as 
high as $62,000, according to Doyle. "The 
figure keeps getting lower." Doyle said. 

Funding for the concert was handled by 
Priscilla West, who was Senate treasurer 
when the concert was held, and by Stanley 
Kinard, festival coordinator. 

"I really don't think there is any hope for 
getting the money back. " said Dion. 'It's 
typical of what was going on the past year 
or so. That's the type of thing that people 
deserve to be disgusted with," he said. 

Doyle said that this meeting would deter 
mine if a full scale investigation would take 
place. "It depends on what happens at the 
meeting, " Doyle said. 

The concert attracted only an estimated 
2000 people, a substantial drop from the 
estimated 25,000 at the 1976 Spnng Con- 
cert. 

The damp weather and the controversy 
over holding an all black music festival 
significantly contributed toward the small 
turnout. Kinard said after the concert. 

The concert featured Buddy Guy and 
Junior Wells, The Duke Ellington Or- 
chestra, Patti Labelle, McCoy Tyner. and 
Pharoah Sanders 



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UMass also involved 



Amherst merchants 
promote center 



By MARK LECCESE 

Merchants in the downtown 
Amherst area, fearing what the 
September opening of the new 
Hampshire Mall on Rte. 9 in Hadley 
could do to business in Amherst 
Center, have formed a committee of 
business leaders to begin a promo- 
tional campaign designed to bring 
consumers in to the downtown area. 

The promotional campaign wil in- 
clude events in the downtown area, 
advertisements in local newspapers, 
special brochures, and a new motto: 
"Amherst, Center of Distinction," 

The group, called the Amherst Cen- 
tral Business District Promotional 
Committee, was set up last March by 
the Amherst Chamber of Commerce. 
Funds for the group will be raised by 
asking merchants in the downtown 
area to contribute $25 a month to the 
committee. 

The committee held its first meeting 
with the downtown merchants last 
Thursday, and about 20 merchants 
pledged a monthly donation, ac- 
cording to Bill McKeon, Chairman of 
the Central Business District Pronxt- 
tional Committee. 

A report issued by the Amherst 
Chamber of Commerce stated that 
the new Hampshire Mall will charge 
at least $600 per tenant for marketing 
and that the mall will have a full-time 
marketing executive. 

Students will receive special atten- 



tourism funds to promote Amherst 
as the host community for Umv^-rsity 
events such as the Toward Tomor 
row Fair, the upcoming Leonard 
Bernstein Festival of Amr.ican Music 
and Mrirraige Encou' lers conven 
tion 

The University F.ne Arts Center is 
aKo donating t^ e services of the cast 
of Bernstein''j comic opera "Trouble in 
Tahiti" r.nd the Thad Jones Mel 
• Lewis band to perform on the 
Amherst Town Common in a fourth 
of July celebration, according to a 
Fine Arts Center spokesperson 

McKeon said the opening of the 
Hampshire Mall will increase the 
number of people in the Amherst 
area All of a sudden the trading 
area is no longer 95,000 people our 
trading is now expanded to over 
200,000," McKeon said. 

According to McKeon, the Hamp 
shire Mall will serve both Hampshire 
and Franklin counties. 

"While it does offer a wide range, 
no mall offers the complete services 
and establishments that are 
necessary to serve community 
needs," McKeon said. 

McKeon also said a mall could not 
properly suit the needs of Amherst's 
large college community "Merchan 
di/ing for a college-oriented com 
munity is a far cry from merchandi/ 
ing for Mr. and Mrs. America in Kan 
sas City. The local merchants have 
these skills." 







tion from the promotional commit 
tee McKeon announced plans for a 
special back to school proniotion, 
featuring social and cultural events in 
the downtown area, in addition to 
what McKeon called "direct con- 
tact," such as student discount 
cards 

"What I think is interesting," 
McKeon said, "is that we have had 
volunteers from the University pro 
pose a market research study to 
determine what kind of action to take 
to attract more students to the 
downtown." 

A former UMass student who now 
runs The Shoe Bin. Mina Lussier, said, 

Amherst itself is an experience. 
There are malls all over the state. 
Amherst was a part of my education; 
so much so that we stayed." 

The promotional committee is also 
working closely with the University 
on some special events. According 
to Lussier, the Amherst Chamber of 
Comme-ce is presently using all of its 



A report issued by the Amherst 
Chamber of Commerce outlined the 
objectives, strengths and 

weaknesses, future plans and pro 
motional strategy of the Central 
Business District Promotional Com 
mittee 

Among the assets, the Chamber 
listed "an extensive free transporta 
tion system" This is the University 
bus system, which in the fall will be 
funded by a combination of federal 
funds and student fees. 

The committee will be promoting 
the opening of the Bangs Communi 
ty Center, which is located in the 
center of town on the newly 
constructed Boltwood Walk 

Other committee promotion ac 
tivities include a weekend of Old 
Fashioned Bargain Days on July 
20 22, which will include an antique 
car parade barber shop quartets, 
contra dancing, an old fashioned 
photo parlour and old fashioned 
games on the common for children. 



SUBSCRIPTIONS 
On csmpui and off campus 



l2.S0'Su(T«nar 



Mail delive'v to University campus and Amherst area same 
business day of publication. All other areas of Massachusetts, 
delivery folloyying day Outside of Massachusetts allovy 2 or 3 days 
delivery Send check or money order to the ^%Mailii«lilH Sum- 
mer ColUgian. Room 113 Campus Center University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst. Massachusetts 01003 Please allow 1 
week for delivery to start 

The office of the MiMachuaatts Sutrwrwr CoHagian is located 
in Room 1 13 of the Murray D Lincoln Campus Center on tlie Untver 
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The M»i«achiii«ni Surrwnar CoHagian is accepted for mail 
ing under the authority of an act of Congress. March 8, 1879 and as 
amended June 1 1 1943 

Second class postage is paid m Amherst. Masssachusetts 01003 
The MM M chu— Hi Surranar CoBagian p<jblisf>es every WadnM- 
day. May 31. 1978 through August 16. 197Sinr:lus<va 



r ' \ 

MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 



C®lll(2#,m2^ 



Co editor 

LAURA M. KENNEY 
Co-editor 

f\AARK A LECCESE 
Business Manager 

LAURIE A WOOD 
Graphics Manager 

BARBARAS LAMKIN 



^ Colle ginn. 




■Wednesday, June 21, 1978 



EdiTORJAl/OpiN ioN 



MichAEl p. doRAN 





Don 't let him get your mind 



Now he has the bad taste to hawk his 
hackneyed, deceitful, maudlin memoirs. 
Memoirs? Of what? Better, why-* 

He spent his early years turning his back 
on his religion, till finally he joined the navy. 
It took the Quakers far tod long to excom- 
municate him Then he went to law school; 
learned how to red- bait, if his congressional 
career is any indication He then hitched on 
with doughty old E ^enhower He ran 
against and lost to Kennedy Then, Pat 
wouldn't sleep with him. Republicans 
wouldn't nominate him, and the press 
wouldn't glorify him. 

The only thing left him was his slimy, self - 
pitying hatred This carried him to the 
presidency Once in power, he concen 
trated his attacks on the "unfair" press He 
tried to squelch it, but ended up tarnishing 
the presidency instead Now that he has 
done his best at turning everything around 
him foul, he is concentrating on hts self, 
trying to self destruct before an eager au- 
dience These are the salient points in his 
existence. Ghoulishly. he leaves them out 
of his memoirs, seeming to dance further 
down the road of self deception. This is 
just too much to take 

This penchant for self destruction found 
Its highest reward prior to tf>e memoirs in 
the interviews with David Frost. But Frost 
did much to frustrate this hunger for public 
humiliation by trying to keep him on the 
suObtantive track The memoirs, however, 
brook no such distraction, and we recieve a 
torrent of tortuous lies and fetid 
meglomanic babble. 

He will make many thousands of dollars 
on this book Maybe the American public is 
re.iHv sick if It can spend money on this 
fTWf b t}ook. But people spend fortunes on 
Hitler's Mercedes and Goering's bad art, so 
this IS nothing new What is really disturb 
ing IS that we ' ' '^n into his trap by 

reading his I*. ^ us nut the money he 
wants, he already gets 600.000 a year from 
us What he could never really get from us 
is our minds This is just the latest vain at- 
tempt of many to do so 

How, you ask, is giving us more fuel for 
disgust and hatred a way to get a hold of 
our minds? A man so desperate for recogni 



tion, any kind of recognition, will stop at 
nothing He allowed himself to be shown as 
a man trying to dredge some dignity out of 
the sewer of his existence in the interviews. 
Only the most vulturous of us could stand 
to watch that But look how much press he 
got And think of all those loyal fans who 
had more evidence that the press is against 



him. Poor dupes But we are just as bad. It 
doesn't matter if the press is good or bad. 
It's press; he's still with us. 
The only thing to do is to ignore him. His 
life lacked anything that resembled un- 
tarnished glory because he never wanted 
that He wanted the glory of the history 
books That final say so that woukj prove 



all his critics wrong. He would probably 
even be happy with unfavorable accounts 
in the books As long as he is not forgotten. 
So don t buy his memoirs. Don't watch 
his interviews Let him fade away. Forget 
him. 

Michael P. Doran is a Collegian Colum- 
nist. 




V^ /M/l5SV^t 



STudENTS U 



You /l^e Mow ENTr(^/Aj6... 
THL TlAJILlCHT ^ONE 
NiTEd For public EducATioN 



^ /^l{is\cHOStTTS 



The 'tax revolt' and public education 



By RON A WEISS and WILLIAM OL SON 

The recent passage of "Proposition 13" 
in California dearly displays a dangerous, 
antisocial dnft in policy making and pro- 
blem solving for our nation. That small pro 
perty holders bear a disproportionate share 
of the states' tax burden cannot be denied, 
but Proposition 13, which sets limits on 
property taxes, is no solution. 

Students United for Public Education sees 
this so called tax revolt as a threat to public 
education. This mandate by the voters to 
put a lid on property taxes will be used by 
legislators across the nation to justify their 
previous decisions to cut social service 
budgets for fire departments, police, public 
hospitals, schools and housing. 

The deterioration of vital social services 
will continue, yet Proposition 13 does not 
address the real source of the problem. 
This is the regressive nature of our tax 
struciure which means particularly on the 
staf" and local level, the working class and 
middle class pay an increasingly larger 
share of their income in taxes. At the same 
time, large profit making corporations and 
banks use loopholes and various govern- 
ment incentive tax credits to evade their 
share of the tax burden, What's more, 
private colleges and universities receive 
millions of dollars in state aid, but maintain 
their no tax status. 

But the most serious implication of Pro 
position 13 is that it denies the inter 
dependence of people in our society. Who 
will be affected when school children are 
closed out of a decent education? Certainly 
not just these children. Who's lives will be 
jeopardized when there is less police and 
fire protection'' Certainly all residents of our 
nations cities and towns. 

Proposition 13 IS not a solution to the tax- 
payer's woes. It will ope/1 a Pandora's box 
of new problems from which few citizens 
can escape. It seems we must ask 
ourselves what has led us to these pro- 
blems? 



In the past few years, many states and 
cities, especially in the Northeast, have had 
difficulties balancing their budgets This is 
because the nature of the tax base taxable 
ir^ome was shifting. Industry, in pan. has 

noved out, while the needs for social ser 
vices, be they housing, education or 
hospitals, contiued to grow Many firms 
moved because they were able to operate 
more profitably elsewhere, but only after 
they had used or depleted the region's 
resources, from trees to people, lakes, 
rivers and quarries. 

What happens to the people left behind, 
the people who came to these areas 
specifically to work in these industries? We 
are still here, but the corporations are leav 
•ng because they can glean larger profits 
f-lsowhere The corporations may no longer 



need us, but we still need education, hous- 
ing, health care, etc. 

In the case of higher education, public col 
leges and universities are being asked to ac 
cept budget cuts and to restructure their 
curriculum to meet the needs of industry. 
Public colleges are shifting academic em 
phasis from lib>eral arts to more technical 
and professional training to meet the 
demands of corporations which are con 
stantly threatening to leave the state. 

Yet private colleges and universities con 
tinue to receive public funds and to enlarge 
their liberal arts programs. Public colleges 
and universities are open and accountable 
to the public while private colleges exclude 
most citizens through high tuition or stiff 
admissions policies. So it is really the 




students of public colleges, children of the 
working class and middle class who are 
most affected (perhaps even excluded) by 
budget cuts and curriculum changes. 

We, Students United for Public Educa- 
tion, believe that education is a right, not a 
privilege, and therefore must be 
guaranteed to all citizens, not just to the 
few who can afford a private education. 

It is a right because with their education, 
students make a contribution to the socie- 
ty. In other words, the right carries with it 
certain social responsibilities. The society 
must provide its citizens with education 
because the fruits of the educational pro- 
cess benefit not just the students, but the 
society in general. 

In the same way, quality public health 
care, housing and transportation (among 
other social services) must be provided, as 
rights, to all citizens because these services 
affect the lives of all members of the socie 
ty, whether or not they are the direct reci- 
pients. Proposition 13 serves to foster the 
illusion that one group of people in our 
society can solve their problems alone - or 
even worse, at the expense of others. But 
they cannot because they are related to and 
affected by the larger society from which 
there is no escape. There must be social 
solutions to social problems. 

The fiscal crisis is a very real problem, but 
the working class and middle class are bear- 
ing the brunt of this problem through high 
taxes and deteriorating social services. Pro- 
position 13 pits the middle class against the 
working class in a hopeless squabble while 
the banks, corporations and private schools 
tip toe off to the sidelines, scot free. If we 
are going to have a "tax revolt," let it be a 
genuine revolt Tax the Fortune Five- 
hundred, restructure our national tax 
system so that it is truly progressive and 
end all public funding of private schools 
and colleges. 

Rona Weiss and William Olson are 
members of Students United for Public 
Education. 



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6 Colle gian. 






\Barry Commoner 

Ecologist urges 
central solar energy 



ff V GA VL E YOUNG 

Time magazine rias l >jlled him a 
professor with a class of millions, ' 
and last Friday night author Barry 
Commoner lectured to a willing class 
of over 2000 in the packed UMass 
Fine Arts Center Concert Hall. 
Commoner the keynote speaker for 
the Toward Tomorrow Fair, is a 
biologist, ecoloyist, educator and 
author of the best selling The Clos 
ing Circle," "Science and Survival," 
and "Poverty of Power " His lecture 
was entitled Making Energy Work" 
and with boundless energy Com- 
moner spoke for 90 minutes, urging 
members of his audience to take 
solar energy out of their backyards 
and to devise a viable plan to make u 
the energy source of the country 

Commoner lambasted President 
Jimmy Carter and his energy plan 
Ht called the plan 9 deception and 




said It "has more nuclear power than 
conservation" and that only one per 
cent of the plan called for solar 
energy. 

"Carter said his political future 
depended on putting through his 
plan in a year," Commoner said. "He 
hasn't, and what's left if it ts in s 
shambles anyway" 

"His failure is a symbol to all of us." 
he told the cheering crowd. "Now 
It's our turn. It's up to us who have 
begun to understand energy to pick 
up the banner and start moving ' 

Commoner warned his audience 
that they are being thrust into a ma- 
jor political and economical arena 
and they must have a plan that solves 
the problem of inflation and puts 
people back to work. 

What is wrong with our current 
energy policy, he s£id, is that we use 



non renewable fossil fuels, and as 
they are used up the price rises. 
There is also a mismatch' between 
the way we produce and use energy 
that makes electricity more expen 
sive and power plants less efficient, ' 
he said 

Energy demand rises steadily, he 
explained, while the supply jumps 
from inadequate to overabundant as 
huge power plants are built "The 
mam way solar energy can rectify the 
economy is that it forces an equaliza 
tion between demand and capacity," 
Commoner said. 

It IS more advisable to have many 
small, centralized solar energy 
sources than few large, decentralized 
plants, he said This plan would cut 
down on energy transmitting costs 
and therefore would decrease the 
cost of the energy. "If a farmer ne«ds 
more corn, the growth of which is a 
form of solar energy, he doesn't 
grow one huge plant, he puts out a 
lot of little ones, said Commoner. 

However, he «varned, solar 
energy is not a panacea, it is not a 
cure for stupidity " The implementa 
tion of It must be done right, he satd 
According to Commoner, plans to 
build big solar energy plants will lose 
money and cause people to claim 
that solar energy doesn't work 
"Solar energy requires centralized 
sources. " he said. 

Commoner said he favors riatural 
gas as a transition to solai energy, 
which he described as energy from 
the sun. wood, and wind He said 
natural gas produces carbon c oxide 
and therefore CDn bt. used safely for 
only about W years "However, it 
can be completely replaced by 
solar, he said 

Small, non polluting cogenerators 
which run on natural gas could be a 
viable source of heat and electricity. 
Commoner said They are small, can 
l>e introduced everywhere, can give 
|obs and political clout and can give 
people control over th»r own lives, 
he said 

Commoner told his listeners that 
they must accept the responsibility to 
answerquestionsaboutmoney Hesaid 
they will face cynicism but advised 
them not to take cynicism for an 
answer "We've got to rebuild the 
economy end show working people 
that is how you create jobs. " 

One of the reasons the country is in 
trouble. Commoner said, is because 
those in control are running 
everything incompetently and "are 
not out to make energy but out to 
make money for some people." 
After his lecture Commoner said the 
people must be educated about solar 
er>ergy. not the politicians, because 
the people will pressure the govern 
ment into making changes. He cited 
the abundance of conservation laws 
as an example of how aware citizens 
can force change for the better He 
said the Toward Tomorrow Fair was^ 
a means to this end, educating the 
people about the need for solar 
energy. 



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Stuart Brand 

Stuart Brand. 39, draped himself over the 
podium and stared out to the audience 
from under his baseball cap. He had just 
met the deadline for his publication 
CoEvolution Quarterly, and as he said - 
"I'm on vacation and I don't give a shit." 

Brand spoke for ten minutes. 

He explained that people like himself and 
NASA scientists share the same time 
horizon as oil and timber companies. What 
a good thing that is because "they don't 
reap the benefits in their administrative 
lifetime. The more aware you are of the 
past the more comfortable you are in the 
future, and that's why I'm not afraid of 
space colonies." 

He then opened it up for questions. 

When asked what he perceived the 
political and social effects of space colonies 
to be. Brand said, "Nobody asked those 
questions when they built supertankers or 
the atom bomb ' He thought perhaps the 
most important effect was that the issue of 
space colonies 'cuts a funny line across the 
body politic." Because of this big 
technology is not necessarily bad. 

Brand spoke of Proposition 13. "It is pro- 
bably a good thing, a weaning of 
something that had gone too far." He 
recognized serious dislocations, but said, "I 
tell you, the will of the people is no small 
thing. The squeaky wheel gets the oil, but 
you have to squeak it good." 

When asked which had a higher priority, 
nr^ntal institutions or space stations, he ex- 
plained that mental institutions were fine 
because they made "space for weirdness," 
but said one can't be under the illusion of 
curing mental illness. 

LEE BURNETT 

Hazel 

Henderson 

Hazel Henderson, author and economist, 
said she believes the societies of the 
western world ate about to enter a "New 
Age " of radically altered visions, concepts, 
and perceptions concerning the world and 
each other 

Speaking Sunday, the author of "Creating 
Alternative Futures " contrasted the dif 
ferent politics of the 1970 Earth Day and the 
1978 Sun Day: "The politics of Earth Day 
gave us that beautiful vision of our planet 
orbiting in the blackness of space while 
energizing the politics of that whole 
decade The re visualization of Sun Day 
was simply a matter of taking that vision of 
a little blue planet to its next level, showing 
us that planet as a water and life beanng 
planet of the mother star, the sun. That 
took everyone out to a new horizon. " 

The "New Age " of the future was defined 
as human potential and spiritual 
movements, ecological action groups, 
those working for social, economic, racial, 
and sexual equality, alternative energy and 
media movements, co-ops, and 
neighborhood power. "All of these people 
will coalesce into a new awareness that 
they embody the aspects of the post 
industrial society They are all microcosms 
of the new planetary society that must 
emerge She added that "the politics of 
reconceptualization is visible in all of the 
next stages of industrial societies," but 
has not yet reached the ideological for- 
tresses of the old institutions."' 

Commenting on the recent controversy in 
California over the tax cutting Propositon 
13, she called it "the perfect example of 
how a social system can get so complex 



that even interest groups can no longer 
model the system well enough to know 
what their own self-interests are." 

"We humans are swarming in new ways" 
Henderson said. "We're learning by doing- 
we re not very good at it yet, but we're 
swarming so that we are sharing a new 
consciousness." 

-THOMAS MAJOR 

Buck minster 

Fuller 

R. Buckminster Fuller, in the last speech 
of the Toward Tomorrow Fair, Sunday told 
a capacity crowd of about 2,000 at the Fine 
Arts Center that looking toward the future 
was "like shooting a golden arrow. The fur 
ther you pull it back, the further it shoots 
ahead " 

Fuller, 83, is a world -renowned futurist, 
architect and educator He is probably 
most famous for his creation of the 
geodesic dome, illustrating his idea of 
"something more with less " Prototypes of 
such domes were prevalent throughout the 
fairgrounds this weekend. 

His lecture was like a history lesson of 
energy through the years, starting with the 




ice age Fuller showed vanous maps of the 
world, attempting to give his audience the 
picture of the "total planet earth... we are 
one spaceship earth, " he said 

"When I was young,"" "Bucky" said, "reali 
ty was only what you could see, smell, 
touch and hear. Now, ultraviolet rays cari 
also show reality."" 

Fuller continued, "Since 1927 I have spent 
my life trying to find ways to meet the 
needs of the human race through many 
resources. I created the geodesic dome, 
which is strong enough to stand on Mt. Fuji 
- even microwaves can go through it." 

He also emphasized that ""energy is our 
wealth." 

-■LAURA KENNEY 

Stewart Udall 

The United States is experiencing one of 
the most profound and fascinating 
historical transitions ever in its history as 
the country passes the crest of the 
Petroleum Age, according to Stewart 
Udall. 

Addressing the topic of "The Imperatives 
of the Energy Revolution" before an au- 
dience in the Fine Arts Center Auditorium, 
the former secretary of the interior and 
Washington lawyer said '"Cheap energy 
has been the great shaping force of the last 
thirty years." 

But, he said, the only decision the United 
States has made in the fast five years to 
deal with depleting domestic oil reserves is 



to import more oil from foreign sources, 
leading to a weakening of the dollar m 
foreign economies. 

Udall said the fault of the Carter ad- 
ministration"s energy policy is that it 

"hasn't told us we'll have to make dramatic 
changes and transitions" adding "this is a 
problem that, because of its subtleties. 
Congress cannot deal with." 

According to Udall, the federal govern- 
n>ent has translated the energy problem in- 
to an economic problem based on the 
simplistic idea that if energy prices are in- 
creased, consumption will fall and conser- 
vation will automatically be effected by the 
higher prices. 

Udall commented on the federal govern- 
ments neglect of solar power by quoting a 
participant of the May 1 celebration of Sun 
Day: "Why arent we doing what we 
should to promote solar development much 
faster? The federal government is an 
elephant And when an elephant wants to 
have intercourse, it looks for another 
elephant. Solar energy, at present, is a 
mouse.'" 

-THOMAS MAJOR 

Mmory Lovins 

The man who has made solar energy ap- 
pealing to Washington bureaucrats, who 
counsels corporate boards on investment 
decisions, who has yet to be refuted by the 
utility companies, came to Amherst Sun- 
day to apeak to fairgoers. 

Amory B Lovins patterned his two 
speeches after his book, "Soft Energy 
Paths: Toward a Durable Peace ' He ex- 
amined two ways of looking at the energy 
problem The hard path is characterized by 
expanding the energy supplies, utilizing the 
historically cheap subsidized fossil fuels 
then giving v/ay to centralized coal or 
nuclear fired electrical power plants in 
order to meet future needs. 

The second view, the soft path, instead 
focuses on the energy demand and at- 
tempts to "supply energy at the right scale 
and quantity for each task " Lovins 
documented that while only 7 percent of 
energy demand requires the electricity, 
other needs can be supplied today by 
renewable, commercially available sources. 

The benefits of the soft path are not 
ideologically grounded, but grounded in 
economic and engineering efficiency, ac- 
cording to Lovins. It is cheaper, quicker, 
safer, surer, politically more practical, bet- 
ter for jobs, and, as he said "spherically 
sensible; it makes sense no matter how you 
look at it." 

The energy path does not mean a choice 
between socialism, or capitalism, or some 
other earth shattering decision because 
there is no need for agreement about larger 
issues, Lovins said. He said there are jobs 
for Labor, capital for business, states' rights 
for conservatives, civil rights for liberals, 
environmental protection for conserva- 
tionists, exciting technologies for 
engineers, chances for small business - 
something for everyone. 

-LEE BURNETT 

Scott Burns 

Economic columnist Scott Burns Satur- 
day said the conflict between the political 
right and left over private or public owner- 
ship of industry is a "battle over stale 
bread"" as these industries have built on an 
irrelevant capital base. 

Burns, author of ""Home, Inc.," and col- 
umnist for the Boston Herald American, 

TURN TO PAGE 10 



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8 Collc ^icin 



Colle gian 9 




Colle gian. 



University Dancers 
to appear on TV 



Bv PAULA WEINER 

Excerpts from the University Dancers 
Spring Concert will be broadcast in a 
special half hour television program on 
channel 57 Springfield s Public Broad 
casting Service station 
The program will be aired tonight at 10:30 
p m , and again on Sunday, June 25, at 
4 30 p m. 

The broadcast represents approximately 
40 percent of the Spring concert. Six out of 
thirteen original pieces, choreographed by 
both faculty and students were chosen to 
be aired on the Channel 57 broadcast. 

Ron Nicodemus, WGBY's cultural affairs 
producer, said that the pieces were chosen 
on the basis of three criteria: variety, those 
dances which represented the University 
Dancers at their best, and the dances 
which were most appropriate for television 
adaptation Nicodemus explained that the 



that production is further complicated by 
he fact that a dancer can do only so many 
takes of a dance before exhaustion will mar 
his or her performance. 

The program consists mainly of modern 
dance and some \azz. Jones explained that 
classical training is evident throughout 
many of the pieces, but laughingly said, 
"We like to do whiat we do better." 
Nicodemus added that he has seen even 
professional companies perform classical 
pieces which they could not master 

Works which were chosen for the broad- 
cast are: "Ase's Death, " a solo 
choreographed and danced by student 
Yves Toussaint with music by Duke El 
iington, "You Don't Have to Come Down," 
choreographed and danced by students 
Peggy Atkinson. Kimberley Bennett, 
Stephen Gibbone, Giny Plonys and An- 
drew Stoessel. 'An Angel Passes," a duet 
with music by Chick Corea and Gary Bur- 



Arts/Dance 



t'.insttMc , ot ijjncf Which has been 
iHoreographed for a procenium to the 
r^iedium of TV involves several complex 
problems such as the correct selection of 
He said that it is important 
jrdpher and the producer to 
A "- • qether in order to achieve the effect 
vwhicn the choreographer intended for the 
dance 

The broadcast is the first time which 
Channel 57 and the University Dancers 
have pooled their talents. 

R II hard Jones, an instructor in the UMass 
dance department and the director of both 
'he Spring concert and the broadcast, said 

Mat he and Nicodemus met at the press 
conference for the Bernstein festival, and 
Jones invited Nicodemus to the Spnng 
concert Nicodemus attended the concert 
and was impressed enough to suggest the 
Channel 57 broadcast 

Nicodemus said that the broadcast took 
full day J of production, and a great 
of pre production planning All the 
camera angles were previously devised and 
ill the dances blocked out Nicodemus said 
that he had a videotape of the dances prior 
•o filming, and knew the dances probably 
ris well as he dancers themselves. He added 



if Burns 



ton choreographed by student Jo Ann 
Murray; "Feeling Spacetime, " a collage 
movement choreographed by faculty 
member Manlyn Patton, "Masq, " a trio 
choreographed and danced by students 
Patti Bradshaw Susan Mahler and Laren 
Neidish; and. "Salute to Duke," and 
ensemble \aii piece set to the music T)f 
Duke Ellington, choreographed by Richard 
Jones 

The goals of variety and quality have been 
admirably realized in this beautifully con- 
ceived and professionally executed pro- 
gram The dances vary from the comic 
perspective of the flopping, jogging suit 
clad dancers of. You Don t Have to Corie 
Down, ' to the seriously dynamic vitality of. 

Salute to Duke ' 

The University Dancers„formed in the fall 
of 1970, is a group of nineteen members 
and seven understudies, v.+io, according to 
Jones, represent the best in dance talent in 
the UMass dance department. The Com 
pany gives several performances each year, 
including a two-week tour during January 
•in which It performs throughout 
Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connec- 
ticut. The Spnng Concert is one of two ma- 
|or concerts which the company offers 
each year 



CONT FROM PAGE 7 
said these targe corporations have lost their 
potential for growth in terms of their capital 
bases and profitability m the last ten years 
He added that the "Fortune 500." the 500 
largest industrial corporations as rated by 
Fortune magazine, have begun to use their 
profits to buy up smaller industries instead 
of buying new machinery and production 
equipment He described this as "corpora 
tions buying each other m a shell game with 
a decreasing number of shells." and blames 
this phenomenon for the recent rise in infia 
tion rates 

Burns called the "corporate America" 
belief a hate object fantasy, referring to a 
principle he formulated when speaking at 
last year's fair "The Irrelevance Pnnciple." 
he said, holds that ideas achieve their 
widest popularity at the moment they 
become irrelevant ' ' 

"Corporate America" will be replaced in 
the near future with the "household 
economy," Burns said. Defining the 



"household economy" as all work done in 
households which is not rewarded with 
wages. Burns said that as people become 
more and moredistrustful of the world 
around them and what it produces, they 
will turn away from it and back to a 
household-based economy Such a shift is 
much more economical today, Burns said, 
descnbing how a household's return on its 
investment in a washing machine is equal 
to that of investing in IBM., and how in- 
vesting in storm windows was in 1973 more 
profitable than investing in all but two of 
the Fortune 500 

He described the main theme of the 
Toward Tomorrow Fair as "The Consumer 
as Producer" "Technology is bringing the 
threshhold for producing goods smaller, so 
you can produce more for yourself, " Burns 
said. "Inflation has made it so that the only 
way to escape higher prices is to produce 
for yourself in order to escape the ex- 
change process with its inflation." 

-THOMAS MAJOR 



j tt-tt-tt-irtt a t-tr-(fte 



S 



CLASSIFIEDS 



•^t^ff^^^ftrtrff-tt-tt-Bs 



Auto for Smh 



1975 Red Plymouth Oueiar 3 speed floor 

mountain standard trans 25 

& FM cassette stereo radio Call Linda 545 

2528 



Large quantities of ice available. 



Ice or 



•OWmi'es AM n^f J^^n^^''" ^^""^ liquors 338 College st 
::all Linda 545- ?£f " 10 am 11 pm. daily 256 8433 or 253 



5384 



ApttforRmtt 



Fum. A|3ts. 1 y? , 2 and 2'/j-rms. For 
summer occupancy Pool, pkg Air-cond. 
Near Shopping. Amherst Motel and Apts. 
Rt 9opp Zayre's 256-8122. 



Htip Wsnttd 



FofRtnt 



Rent a mini re f riger eto r for eummsr. 

Poolside, Patio, Summer home $10 a 
month plus tax Spirit Haus Refrigerator 
Rentals 338 College St Open 10 am - 11 
pm Daily 256 8433 or 253 5384 

Apt Available nov^ Sublet June-Aug, Fall 
option 2 Bedroon semifurnished for $150 
on bus route, pool, laundry, near stores, 
etc For more info call Belle 549 5317 



On0/Two day help instating homemade 
solar HW heater, Sunderland, M/F, no 
phone pis wnte Collegian, 113 C.C UM, 
Amherst 01003 

Addressers vMinted immediately! Work at 
home no experience necessary ex- 
cellent pay. Write Amencan Service, 8350 
Park Lane. Suite 127. Dallas. Tx 75231 



Audio 

Pioneer FM car stereo c ass ette deck 2 

Jensen co axial & 2 Realistic speakers Sold 
car no reasonable offer refused Call Brad 
253 7462 



ToSubht 



Now through August 31, room in Puffton 
Villiage, $75/month plus utilities. Call Sue 
nr I aura at 549 1338 or 545 3500 



ForSah 



Stick in in your ^m - we'll pierce them free 
you buy the studs Silverscape' Designs, 
264 N Pleasant St Amherst 253 3324. 







Tires and Wheels 

5 Firestone Steel belted radials 
mounted on maqs $375 253 7065 

i ftftt-g ft n ■ a t 



'■' '"•■' '■'V 'nnt'^l, )9/3 



Racquets by: 




377 Main St. 



Bancroft Spalding 
Dunlop Wilson 

Davis 

Restringing Cr Regripping 

The best is at 

FENTONS 

Athletic Supplies 

253-31173 




MONDAY DISCO PARTy 







CoWc ^K^n 11 



Amhertt 




Does your hammock turn 
your car over in the morning? 




•■^1-1^ J"*"-^ «.;.,',.•,;, ..fV .1.7,. 



W^ %^ 



STRONG, COLORFUL HAMMOCKS $35. 




Faces of Earth Downtown Amher^.t 10:00-6:00 Mon.-Sat. 



Intramural teams play; 
to continue thru summer 



fly GENE GRZYWNA 

During the first session eight Softball 
teams have begun competition They are 
split into two, four team leagues. The 
American League is made up of the English 
Department, "Da Sharks' ,d Student 
Senate team led by Speaker Brian 
DeLima), the Bureaucrats (a team organized 
by the Conference Services Office) and 
Random Walk la graduate faculty team 
from the Polymer Science Department) 




oooom^" 




2 Great Ways 
lO Go Goodyear 



A78-I3 whitewall. plus 
$1 82 F.E.T. and t'ade 




Custom Power Cushion Pol>gl 

• Fiberylass belts for strength and 
mileage • RuRHPd polyester cord 
body for smnrith ride • Multi-Krip 
tread design 



L78-15 




tri\'\/r%.\^frrl\^} 



Good Grip... Smooth Ride! 




B7813 
blac^wall, 
plus $1.72 
FE T and 
trade. 



AJIAVeather 78 

• Resilient polyester cord 

• Roail-holdins R-rih trr;i(l 



■Uckaall 
Sitt 


PRICE 


FiM r.i T. 

•Mtirt 


E78 14 


$26 


$2.03 


F7814 


127 


$204 


G78-14 


ttt 


$2 19 


G78I5 


$30 


$2 38 



OTHER SIZES LOW 
PRICED, TOO! 



Lube & Oil Change 

$C88 -^ 

Irr udP' '1 fn ^ 

Quarts Quaker 
State '>^ Ji^oi. 

PROTECTS MOVING PARTS - 
ENSURES QUIET OPERATION 

• Complclp oil chariKf nnd chas- 
sis liibririHinn • Frisiir-s smnnlh 
prrf()rn),inrr. rrfhircs ihr rhnnros 
of wear • Please phone- for np- 
pointmeni»lnrIiidps light Irucks 




Front-End Ali'i^ment 
And 4-Tire Rotation 



w ."^ 




Engine Tune-Up 

$1088 



Additional part^ and 
services enfra i( needed 
front. wheel drive excluded 

IMPROVES TIRE WEAR 
AND VEHICLE PERFORMANCE 

• Insprc I nnci rolali' all 4 lirr-s • Si I 
r.istfr. camhiT. and lo«>-in to fat lory 
sprrifirations • Inspprl siispfn<!ir)n 
and sli rrinj! system • Most f S. rars 
somf imports 



39 



(cyi. 



Includes parts and labor 
no extra charge for air 
conditioned cars. Electronic 
Ignition cars $4 less. 

HELPS ENSURE BETTER GAS 
MILEAGE AND PERFORMANCE 

• i:itM tronir: e-n;. :i.-. rhnrRinK. arid starl- 
ing system analysis • Install now points, 
"pln«s. r ondcnsrr. rotor • Sol dwell and 
timinK • Adjust carburetor for economy 

• ln( hides Datsun. Toyota. VW and 
lishl Iriirks 



Just Say 'Charge It' 

IN.' dm of ihfsr - „(|„.r way, to buv Our Own 
f.re.lil I'bn • Masl.T CharRP • n«nk.Ameri.:arrt 
Fxprpss Mon.H Cnr.l • r arte Bl.inrhc • Diners 



Cuslnmpr 
• Amrrican 
Club • Ca^h 



iSV'M: 



GOOD/YEAR 

For more good years in your car 



j (ioodM'dr Rt\ol\in}> ( haryt Account 

■J 

182 King StrMt, Northampton 586-4020 Official Stata inapaction Station 
Jfwj>ort_HouraJ;30-5;30 Monday-Friday, Thuraday 'til 8 p.m. Saturday 1W S. 



This league plays its games at b.M on 
Tuesdays and Thursdays 
The National League plays its games at 
b 30 on Mondays and Wednesdays The 
tour teams involved in this division are the 

fmn?'?h ' p?^'^"' '" graduate faculty tearJ 
from the Plant and Soil Science Depart- 
ment), the SBA Sobs (from the SchoSf of 
Business) and RRM (from the Office of 
Residential Resource Management) 
Twenty ^one people (13 men and eight 
women) have entered tennis singles for the 
first Summer Session. They are broken 
down into three leagues: DAshe Men's 
^n^Zr^- . 2'Borg Mens Intermediate; 
and 3)Casals Women s Open Anyone in- 
erested in entering tennis competition for 
the second Summer Session may enter 
nght now at the Intramural Office 215 
Boyden The type of tournament run for 
oach sport and division is determined by 
the number of entries. In tennis, these in 
elude five different divisions' men's and 
wornens singles, mens and women's 
doubles, and mixed doubles 

In tennis matches played last Wednesday 
and Thursday. Dick Lindgren defeated 
Steve Dahl. (6 2.6 2). Tony Gngonis was 
victorious over David Phoenix. (10 5) and 
Assistant UMass Basketball Coach' Ray 
Ricketts whipped Grigonis, (10^3) In a 
Wornens division match between Ann 
Koski and Judy Simonds. Koski won 
(10-4). 

The Softball season began Wednesday 
June 14th with two games The Midnight 
Ashcans shellacked the Potted Planters 
^10. on the strength of a fifteen run first in- 
ning The Ashcans have been observed 
getting a lot of practice time in, and this 
seems to have been the difference in their 
victory over the inexperienced and rusty 

TURN TO PAGE 14 




12 Coile ^ian. 




ON THE LAWN 
IN THE BERKSHIRE MOUNTAINS 

LENOX. MASSACHUSETTS 413 637 2200 

SUNDAY JUNE 25 3 30 PM 
$7 ADVANCE $8 DAY OF SHOW AN AF Tt RNOON Of JAZZ WITH 





TiHii musADlR: 

^©YAYERS UBiQUlTY 

FOLLOWING SHOWS ON SALE :.TARTING JUNE 23RD 

PABLO CRUISE / MARC JORDAN 

UM V ) •, .• .)0 S 7 00 ACV %H 00 OA Y '•' t 1 H OVV 

JERRY JEFF WALKER /JOHN PRINE JONATHAN EDWARDS 

II I > .'.• ) 10 '^.. so ADV S'SOljAV (.jf- oHOVV 

DIRT BAND / ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL 

.Di. \ > ) '■ no $' on .-WiV SH on(;Av ,!► ,m.iv, 
JEAN LUC PONTY /JOHN McLAUGHLIN 

J I M V ( 'j 00 

NEW RIDERS / RICHIE FURAY 

AUG 1<J T 30 S() '.0 AIJV Z/ ')0 DAY in SHOW 

DAVID BROMBERG / MUDDY WATERS / TRACY NELSON 

AUG 2 7 '. 00 1 ' ',0 AfJV $8 '.0 IJA V OF bHO>/V 

BONNIE RAITT 



PURCHASE TICKETS EARLY AND SAVE MONEY 



SUNSHINE ALLEY LENOX. AUDIO DESIGN PITTSFIELD; JUST A SONG. 
ALBANY MUSIC INN BOX OFFICE ALLTICKETRON 



BY MAIL SEND CERTIFIED CHECK OR 
MONEY ORDER PAYABLE TO 
ATLANTIC PRESENTATIONS 
PO. BOX 971 LENOX MA. 01240 i 
ENCLOSE SELF ADDRESSED 1 

STAMPED ENVELOPE -^ 

CHILDREN UNDER 8 YRS FREE 



MASS PIKE EXIT 2, 
► WEST RT 102. 

NORTH RT. 7 
TURN LEFT 
ON OLD 
STOCK- 
BRIDGE RD 
FOLLOW 
SIGNS 



THE IDEAL SUMMER SPOT FOR A CONCERT 



BOSTON GLOBe 




Over a century 



Editors' Note: This is the first of a 
two part series on the history of stu 
dent publications at what has been 
known as (Massachusetts 

Agricultural College, Massachusetts 
State College and the University of 
Massachusetts over the past one 
hundred and eleven years Part two 
will appear next week 



By CHERYL CZERNIAK 

In 1887. when memories of former 
President Abraham Lincoln were still 
very real. a Massachusetts 
Agricultural College student 
newspaper published an account of a 
reader's meeting with the great man. 
In 1934, when the depression was 
still taking its toll on an <ilready in 
)ured nation, an intercollegiate daily 
ran a series explaining President 
Roosevelt's monetary band aid for 
the economy. 
In 1968, when the popular rock 
group, "The Bee Gees," released 
their "Hon/ontal" LP. a University of 
Massachusetts student newspaper 
reviewed the album, and (udged it 
"not quite the Beatles ' 
The student publications of the past 
uniquely tell the story of life at 
UMass and nrnire gerterally reveal 
what was on the minds of college 
students for more than a century 

The musty papers and maga/iries, 
brittle and yoUow with age in sonf>e 
cases, live in a small room on the 
25th floor of the library as a nnost in 
teresting part of the University Ar 
chives 

The earliest student publication on 
file is The Register, a commence- 
ment paper published m 1871, when 
UMass was the Massachusetts 



Agricultural College. 

The annual paper, published in .'., 
ly. printed the class oration, ode, 
poem, history, benediciion and 
statistics. The graduation class of 
1873, for example, was comprised of 
only 13 men 

The eiqht page paper also included 
a program of events connected with 
commencement week The last issue 
a|)«?ared in 1876 

The first real Hews paper took 
shape in March of 1887 The 4 page 
CoNege lyiomhly. which lasted only 
a little, (iver ,i year, contained an 
nouncements, agricultural news, 
letters to the editor and short 
poems. 

In a bit of poetic propaganda. The 
Morrthly provided a self description: 
The paper is instructive 
It has ample range 
With items from both colleges 
And also from the Grange 
So listen to this good advice - 
You'd better not refuse 
Just send in your subscription. 
And we'll tell you all the news 
After the fold of The Monthly in 
1888. the college remained paperless 
for over a year Then Aggie LWe. the 
granddaddy of The Oeily CoMegian 
of today strolled into the picture 

The purpose of the publica.ion, ac- 
cording to the editors, was to 
"record all matters of general interest 
concerning the college and the alum 
m' arnJ "to keep up a lively interest in 
all forms of literary work." The paper 
furthermore sought to "represent the 
college impartially ar>d advance its 
best interests " 
Aggie Life included sports articles, 
college notes and announcements, 
alumni news, and news about cam- 
pus and later intercollegiate events, 
but the main feature of the publica- 





of students ' ink 

I 



tion was Its passive editorials. 
The bi monthly paper advocated 
the establishment of a Natural 
History Society and a Fall Field Day. 
It attacked the failure of the college 
to repave a concrete walk that flood 
ed every rainfall and suggested that 
students make greater use of the 
library reading room The paper also 
crusaded for a policy of daily recita 
tions of lessons in typical grade 
school style to promote regular stu- 
dying and prevent cramming for ex- 
ams 
Aggie Life changed its nanrie in 
1907 The new College Signal was a 
bit more newsy than its predecessor 
and sports also became increasingly 
prevalent The college announce 
ment and alumni sections remained 
intact 

In September 1914, the publication 
again changed the name on its 
masthead and became The 
Massachusetts Collegian. 
The college's first attempt at a 
literary magazine canr>e in 1910. 
vvith the establishment of The MAC 
Literary Momhly. The publication 
was a collection of poems, short 
stories and essays. The effort 
however proved fruitless as the mon- 
thly died that same year 

The year 1914 brought still a dif- 
ferent type of literary adventure to 
the agricultural college the 

humorous publication. 

The paper, a collection of jokes, 
cartoons and short humourous 
essays and articles, was called The 
Friday War Cry. It was published 
every Friday and could be purchased 
for three cents 

Its aim was to knock everyone in 
college at son>e time or other." To 
compensate those teased by The 
War Cry. a free edition was 



distributed to any whose name ap 
peared in the paper. 
The War Cry lasted only a year but 
the humorous publication did not 
disappear Instead the newspaper 
became a magazine and was renamed 
The Aggie Squib. Now priced at 
35 cents an issue, The Squib was 
published six times a year. 
Jokes, cartoons and funny articles 
still packed the pages of the 
niagazine. but the revised version, 
complete with an "Advice to the 
Lovelorn " column, had broadened its 
scope Its jokes became much more 
general, many of which were not in 
anyway relatd to college life 
Each Squib bore a dedication or a 
"number." For example, a "College 
Girl's Number " was published as well 
as an Educated Number. " a 
"Freshman Number," a "Police 
Gazette Number" and a "Cupid 
Number"' (for Valentine' s Day) 
The Squib met competition in 
February 1920 when a small weekly 
humor paper popped out of the 
woodwork Sold for "two Lincolns," 
The Ra2or Blade was established 
because a need was felt "for a paper 
that was purely local m character "' 
Therefore, while The Squib would 
publish a lokelike 

Teacher "Can anyone tell me what 
IS even higher than a king'" 
Pupil "The Ace" 
The Razor Blade contained jokes 
about the college itself and about the 
individual students attending the 
school. 
The Blade reported in one edition, 
for example, that The Botany Club 
challenges any organization on the 
campus to a ganr>e of solitaire. " and 
in another that "The college book 
store has received a carload of rattles 
to be distributed among the men tak- 



AiftVJt 



'ISJ . 4Tlf 



Tm«. lt<^WOOC 



\?^^ 






m^M nil 



.'.fUl 



m 



3tm 



DINNER 

TUES.-WED.-THURS. 

LobsTER Chow Mein 

$5.50 

FRIDAY-SATURDAY 

BAkEd SeaFoocI 
CasseroIe 

$5.50 

SUNDAY 

SeaFoocI NEwbuRq 

$5.50 



Colle gian '3 



a:l)c Uavcilcv. 



x.-liUlU 



l-uvl, ri'i ii-i " ' -' 



^ly THE AGGIE HAN^ _ 

THE KieK OFF 



Vol I 



w \ 



^ ViMluivi M.i>s.ului>ills, U.lolHr .'I, I'.K) 



N- I 



OKFKNSIVK DRIVKS^ TKAM HAS t<mmi h^aks 

SHOWN IT ASHKS Ol FORM » i '""' '""'"•'*' 



. 



ing Ec Soc. 50. " . 

The Razor Blade retired after 
almost four years of publication The 
Squib, although it outlasted its com 
panion, met the same ill fate a year 
later. 

With the demise of the pair of joke 
journals, college publications ex- 
perienced a period of deep freeze and 
the next significant publication 
wasn't born until aln>ost ten years 
later. 

MAC had changed its name to MSC 
or Massachusetts State College 
when The Massachusetts Colli- 
sion finally came to pass m 1 933. 

The newspaper printed news, 
editorials and sports "anything that 
stayed within the limits of common 
decency ' 

The Collision also came com- 
plete with a gossip column 
where, for example, the weekly 
passed the word that ""Dutchy (?) 
is very much ts company with a 
young lady from the other side of 
campus" 

Sadly, the paper immediately 
took ill and could not survive 
even a semester. 

Followintj The Collision's retire 



ment, a brand new newspaper based 
upon a brand new objective sprung 
up The Intercollegiate Daily 
Ne<««, as its name implies, was 
designed to serve the interests of the 
four college circle (Hampshire Col 
lege was not yet part of the system). 

For five cents a reader was given 
not only college news and sports, but 
also a taste of what was going on in 
the outside world, through regular ar- 
ticles and a column devoted to brief 
wire service stories. 

The intercollegiate paper however 
could not manage to maintain suffi- 
cient student interest and therefore 
did not survive long enough to 
celebrate its first birthday. 

The year 1938 witnessed a resurrec- 
tion of the literary magazine which 
had remained entombed for nearly 30 
years. Published in connection with 
the newspaper. The Collegian, the 
20 page Collegian Quarterly 
sought to offer "students an outlet 
for the expression of their ideas and 
experiences." 

The name of the magazine changed 
to The Quarterly in 1946 and its 

TURN TO PAGE 15 



%*^ 



c^ ©(mdi /^lh)®©i /y© 




§)llii^/ 



at A.J. Hastings 
neivsdealer and stationer 



45 S. Pleasant St. 



Amherst 



June 29, 30 July 1 and 3- 8 pm 

west 
side" 
story--^^^' 







fil 



boseo on a conception of lerome robbins 

music by 

leonard bernstein 

lyrics by 

Stephen sondheim 

book by 

arthur laurents 

entire wginai prcxluctior, 

Jerome robbins 



directed by Sidney eden 
chorjeography by richard jones 
musical direction by roberl gutter 
tickets $7, $6, S5 
umoss students $5. $4. S3 
other students, senior citizens S6, 55, $4 
tickets available at the fine arts center 
b^x office and all ticketron locations 

leoncrd berr^enfe^ 

a cmerccn muse %re 29-jJv 2a 1978 
fhe crts a2nter 

Ln\^2rsJty of nnassochusctts 

at cmherst ( 

cfcn Igfit fi2sti\^ direclof 'kX^BBSF^IU 

robcrt guttei: miBC dJrcclDf ^^^^^ 




14 CoIlegiajQi 



iWednesdav June 21 1978 



Delano's: a simple, 
adequate menu 



DELANOS 
By DON LESSER 

It is a grtMt mistake to expect more of a 
restaurant than it is prepared to deliver. 
Delano's is no bastion of haute cuisine, but 
then it does not pretend to be. It offers a 
decent meal for $3.00 to $5.00 and to give 
credit where credit is due, for the most part 
Jt delivers Its prices are reasonable, if not 
cheap, but what is cheap these days? 

Delano's two mainstays are the ham- 
burger and the omelette The hamburger 
($2.46) is a decent-sized patty, garnished 
with cole slaw, and potato chips and pickle. 
There are a variety of customizing additions 
that range from the basic bacon, lenuce, 
tonr^to, onion and chili to the more exotic 
avocado and peanut buner. Five kinds of 
cheaees are also offered: American 
Muenster, Cheddar, blue and Swiss. I 
would avoid the chili, which is bland and 



hamburger as well as spinach, sprouts, 
strawberries and sour, cream if you wish. 
The omelettes are all pan cooked, appear 
to be 3 eggs worth and are a deal. 

Delano's also offers a range of salads, 
from the simple tossed j$,95 or $1 50 for 
iceburg lettuce, cucumber, onion, tomato 
and a black olive) to • spinach salad that is 
tasty but overpriced at $2.40. You can get 
either a vegetarian or a meaty Chef s Salad, 
as well as a Caesar Salad or one with 
chunks of tuna fish. Their dressings are 
bottled ar>d the blue cf>eese lacks chunks or 
real bite, but in keeping with Delano's style, 
they are perfectly adequate. 

Delano's also offers a Sirloin dinner for 
$4.95, Steak Delannoy ($3 96) which is 
marinated London Broil that is good but 
lacks any taste or marinade, and Scallops 
($3.96). These all come with the tossed 
salad, a slice of french bread and a potato, 
but they are nothing really special There is 
a daily special that sometimes is spaghetti 



Food 



tomato- y, and the very thought of a peanut 
butter burger induces shudders but it is 
possible to corwtruct a vary tasty nrieai if 
on* « sensible about it. They are not overly 
q>nfOus with their additions but you do 
get enough for at least a taste. A medium 
rare burger usually arrives nr>edium rare, 
^en in the height of a dinner rush. The 
staff is more than willing to correct any 
mistakes so there is no need to eat a well 
done blue-cheeseburger wf>en you really 
wanted it rare with Cheddar, bacon and 
tomato. 

The omelettes ($2.10) can also be 
customized and they come with rye toast. 
You can have anything that goes on the 



if /ntramura/s 



and clam sauce, whose occasior>al grit- 
tiness betrays its freshness, or a chicken 
dinner that I have yet to taste, it b«>.ng sold 
out by 7 p.m. on three separate occasions. 

Desserts are pies, cakes, eriairs and they 
are all baked by a woman in Turner's Falls. I 
believe, and she does k.>ow b-r stuff. The 
chocolate cake is a 'arge serving but is not 
overly chocolaty The cheesecke ($.95) is 
light but delicious. The coffee is not bed 
arKJ the refills are free. 

In short, Delano's ^ a dean, softty-lit 
place whose decor may lean towards 
butcher-block chic and whose menu may 
t>e simple, but it is a perfectly adequate 
place to eat. 



CONT. FROM PAGE 11 

Planters, who had some defensive li. 
Bill Dorris led the Ashcan attack with four 
hits, followed by Sy Berger's and Dan 
BIythe's three hits, and Ken Stickne/s and 
Jay Safier's two hits apiece. Brian Stagner 
with a homer and Coach Ed O'Brien with a 
triple were also hitting stars. Paul Willing 
with two hits led the losing Planters. 

The other game resulted in another 
shutout with RRM halting SBA by the 
score of 13-0. RRM spread their scoring out 
pretty evenly getting three in the first, four 
in both the second and third, and two in the 
fifth. Dennis Murray and Tom Oliver had 
two hits eech for the losing SBA team. 
RRM was led by Tom O'Connor (home 
run). Brad Brandts, and Cliff Pedrow, all 
with three hits apiece. 

Thursday's games had a lot of scoring and 
one extra inning affair, "Da Sharks " 
squeezed out a 10-9 victory over the 
Bureaucrats in eight innings. Random Walk 
rolled over the English Dept., 22-10, in the 



other game. For English, Gary Aho and 
Michael Egan had two hits. The victorious 
Random Walk team were led by Dave 
Anderson's three safties, and seven other 
teammates with at least two hits each; all 
ten players hit safely. The telling statistic in 
this game was that 8 out of 9 Random run- 
ners who reached base via walk were able 
to later score. 

The Bureaucrats fought back from an 8-0 
deficit to tie "Da Sharks" in the fir>al in- 
ning, but then went down to defeat in an ex- 
tra frame. Mike Narkiewicz and David 
Temkin had four hits for the Bureaucrats; 
Coach Mark Spengler and Fred Borman 
had three hits apiece for the losers. "Da 
Sharks" had two hits by Alfred Drewes and 
Jon Hensleigh, but nx)St of their runs 
scored via Bureaucrat errors (four in one in- 
ning that led to a five run outburst). "Da 
Sharks " only had six hits in the whole 
gamel 

In tonight's action, RRM meets the 
Ashcans, and it's the Planters versus SBA. 



Notices 



THANiiCENDEN TAL MEDI TA TION 

An effortless technique for the natural 
development of higher states of con- 
sciousness. Practiced twice daily for 15-20 
minutes morning and evening, TM enlivens 
the untapped potential of the individual. 
Students will notice an increased in- 
telligence growth rate, increased learning 
ability and an t m pii B|yd grade point 
average. To learn mortii}j|||pne to a free in- 
troductory lecture on ThutMiy, June 22 at 
7:30 p.m. in Rm. 91 1-91 5 CtH^pus Center. 

BLOOGMOB/LE 

The downtown churcfiae of Northamp- 
ton are sponsoring a "Gift of U^" Blood 
mobile on Thursday, June 29. The Blood- 
mobile will be at Edwards Church on Main 
St., and donor hours are from 2 p.m. to 8 
p.m. Donors should be in good fiaaKh. 
weigh at least 1 10 pounds, and be between 
the ages of 18 and 65. A regular meal 
should be eaten within four hours of dona- 
tion. No appointment necessary. 



C.AO.S. 
Counseling Assistance for 



Older 



Students will hold office hours and give 
summer counseling Monday thru Thurs- 
day, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Also, all day 
June 26th and July 17th thru 21st, from 9 
a.m. to 5 p.m., and in Herter Hall, Room 
102, from 1 to 5 p.m. For more information 
call 545^(X)57 or come to Room 207. 
Hasbrouck Hall. 

NORTHAMPTON MORRIS 

Olde English, pre-christian fertility 
dances. These are ritual dances that were 
danced to help bring the crops up. The 
Northampton Morris practices every Thurs- 
day night in the Cape Cod Loung* of the 
Student Union building at UMass at 7:30 
p.m. Everyone is welcome. For more in- 
formation, call Heidi at 549 6138. 



LEGAL SERVICES OFFICE 

If you am a UMass, activity-fee paying 
student, or summer student, and have a 
legal problem, free legal advice or possibly 
representation is available at ttie L.S.O. on 
an appointment basis. 922 Campus Center 
646-1996. 



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Infectious music 
makes two avid fans 



ay BILL KOBER and JERRY ROGERU 

We've been good friends now for four 
years and the New Rhythm and Blues 
Quartet (NRBQ) has always been a focal 
point of ours when searching out good 
qiusic. On many occasions the two of us 
have rounded up groups of our friends and 
taken them to experience the infectious 
brand of music made by Al Anderson, 
Terry Adams, Joe Spampinato, Tom Ar- 
dolino and the Whole Wheat Horns, Donn 
Adams and Keith Spnng. 
We thought, as avid fans as we are, who 
is better qualified to review NRBQ's per- 
formance at the Rusty Nail than we? So, 
with insatiable anticipation we downed a 
pint of Dewar's White Label and quite a 
few Rolling Rocks before the show. We 
agonized through the peformance of the 
Four Star Combo because we greedily 
wanted the Qonly. 

The boys walked on the stage, picked up 
their instruments, and rpatter of factly 
opened the first set with "Cecilia." Yet this 
wondrously simple and unpretentious 
opening belies the enthusiasm with which 
the near capacity crowd stormed the dance 
floor and the immediacy with which we lost 
forever any shred of critics' objectivity. 
After the show we moaned about the 
potential loss of credibility we might suffer 
if we weren't at least a little bit critical in our 
reporting. We must confess, however, that 
we are unable (perhaps unwilling) to find 
any worm in the apple. 

NRBQ works hard at its music. Their loyal- 
ty to their music and their unique blending 
of styles ranging from country swing to 
rock and roll, blues and jazz demands hard 
work. 

But the hard work pays off for xha band 
with every performance. They obviously 
enjoy their music, they love their music 
even, and their fans love them in return. 
Their distinctive sound is never tedious 
because their repertoire is always expan- 



ding. We've never been to a per*o.'n.j(ic« 
in which they didn't have some good new 
music, something new to pique our interest 
and further endear us to them. 

Don't let the seemingly ambivalent man- 
ner of guitarist Al Anderson fool you. 
Though he helps Joe Spampinato, the 
bassist, lend some stability to the 
boundless energy and animation provided 
by Terry Adams and his keyboards, Al is 
the Duke of Windsor and a sensitive ruler 
Uncle Al. 

To his left, we always find Joe Spam- 
pinato in the center with long steady 
fingers anchoring the band, but even this 
anchoring role does not preclude him from 
breaking out into a large smile when the 
show is going well. 

Behind Joe, drummer Tom Ardolino is 
amazing because of his relentless work 
while rarely, if ever, getting a long riff of his 
own. 

And to the left of Joe we find Terry 
Adams given a whole corner of the stage to 
himself so he can have enough room to 
dance furiously over and on his keyboards 

Finally, behind Terry, the Whole Wheat 
Horns, Terry'sbrotherDonnandKeithSpring, 
also a part time celebrity in residence iri 
a local record shop, sit quietly, exploding 
into song when the trombone or sax- 
ophone, respectiveiy are needed. 

These musicians flashing grins to the 
crowd while keying into each other's music 
can't help but provide the dancers with a 
feeling of intimacy. The band wants its 
reputation to rest solely on its music and 
their loyalty to their music translates into 
fan loyalty to the band. 

The Duke of Windsor pointed out that the 
band doesn't have to put out albums like 
the commercially successful NRBQ at 
Yankee Stadium to pack the house. Cer- 
tainly their following grows larger all the 
time, and albums are selling well even on 
the infrequently visited West Coast. 



Some summer magic 



By MARIO A. BARROS 

A number of groups have tossed their 
hats into the summer ring. A couple have 
created some heat waves of their own and 
rendered some music with that "summer 
magic." 

Fired Up & Kickin' by the Fatback Band 
IS the biggest shaker they've had in a while. 
Some of the tunes are taken a little too 
lightly but the band gets back to their tight 
boogie st. ndard in fine shape with "I'm 
Fired Up " Here, they get down once again 
with those carefree rhythm tracks and 
chantable vocals. The feeling gets carried 
on in "Get On The Dance Floor" with the 
key word, release, for this set. 
A left field pick off of this one that's really 
caught on is "I Like Girls." This one shows 
Fatback s ability to catch the pulse of the 
latest dance craze. They caught on the Bus 
Stop, owned the Spanish Hustle and now 
they seem to have the biggest freak 
number going. "I Like Girls" is doing 
nothing short of kicking the freakers' ass. A 
couple of fair ballads round this Spring 
(Polydor) LP out and make it a worthwhile 
outing. 

Hamilton Fredrick Bohannon has really 
sought out the throne as king of the "hap- 
py music." His majestic chapels have 
adorned many a dance floor and provided 
sanctuary for many of his dancing subjects. 
In pursuit of a higher form, he recorded his 
On l\^ Way LP. But ah, this music made 



* Student ink 



the "king" inaccessible and too self- 
righteous. Summertime Groove, his 
latest, changes all that. He's back and 
wants all to be forgiven. Side one opens 
with the plea "Let's Start The Dance." The 
addition of the screaming banshee, 
Caroline, has the music grounded into the 
mainstream of today's dance music. 
Bohannon still has that percussive arrang- 
ing quality that makes his elaborate in- 
strumentation never seem wasteful. This 
one is hotter than the Pog Days of August, 
but it's really frisky. 

Summertime is always ^ good time for 
solid rock & roll to ripen in the sun and 
Anola Records has two strong entries. 
Breaking onto the power pop scene are t|ie 
Heaters. With a no nonsense approach, 
they waste no time with some fierce, short 
and high-powered numbers that reach off 
the vinyl and grab your attention. Not quite 
punk, this group spans enough gaps to 
make a few waves in the summer heat 
Simply entitled The Heaters, this is a 
strong effort. 

In a more boogie-styled vein are the 
Sunset Bombers. A tough remake of 
Steve Winwood's "Gimme Some Lovin' " 
highlights here but doesn't overshadow 
numbers like "Suicide Kamikaze Girls" and 
"Dirty Pictures." They get a little adoles- 
cent at times but the titles kind of hint that 
that's the point. If so, they do it well and 
pull off a nice piece of satire on the sixties' 
kidz. 



CONT. FROM PAGF 11 
publication was increased to four 
issues per year. At 25 cents per edi- 
tion, the magazine offered a samp- 
ling of photos, artworks, essays, 
poetry and short stories which 
managed to diffuse through the col- 
lege atmosphere of hard study. 

The Quarterly was suspended 
from publication in the fall of 1954 for 
the printing of articles the administra- 
tion deemed "improper." The 
magazine however returned to the 
campus in the spring of 1955. 

The literary booklet was yet to ex- 
perience two more name changes. It 
was renamed The Literary 
Magazine of the University of 
Massachusetts in 1959 and called 
Caesura in 1962. 

Caesura was published three times 
each year like the original publication 
and was sold at an annual subscrip- 
tion rate of $1.50. Caesura became 



defunct in 1966. 

The Liaison, a publication that sur- 
faced in 1944, focused upon the col- 
lege alumni, an idea that had gone 
down with the early "Aggie" 
newspapers. 

The semesterly paper sought "to 
provide a medium of memorable ex- 
pression for former students of MSC 
who enjoy writing, discussion and 
criticism as fine arts." Alumni con- 
tributions of book reviews, letters, 
poems, short stories and informal 
essays helped The Liaison keep its 
head above water for about two 
years, but it sunk in 1946. 



Next week: A publication banned 
from the Student Union as obscene 
the "Squaw's Page, " and the in- 
famous Yahoo, among the other 
student publications that brought us 
into the seventies. 



J 




MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 



VOLUME V. ISSUES 



WEDNESDAY. JUNE 28. 1978 





Siu<k-ni N»-ws|V.Mier ol i»h rniv.rs^u of Mass.M husriis Amhcrsi M* ohmii 14111 -,4'-, i«ui<) 



J 



The Impulse Dance Company will per 
form a program of modern, jazz, spiritual, 
and blues dance tonight in Bowker 
Auditorium m Stockbridge Hall. 

The company's repertoire includes works 
by Alvin Adey, Chuck Davis, Consuelo, Jon 
Houston. Clover Mathis, and Adrienne 
Hawkins, the artistic director of the com- 
pany. 

Impulse Dance began as a five woman 
collective and has grown to a tax-exempt 
organization of professional men and 



women dancers who teach and perform 
throughout New England, operating with a 
grant from the Massachusetts Council for 
the Arts and Humanities Adrienne 
Hawkins, the company's artistic director, 
has also recently assumed the position of 
Artistic Director at the Joy of Movement 
Center in Cambridge, after having taught 
dance at Boston University for three years. 

Members of the company will instruct a 
modern and jazz dance workshop offered 
by the Summer Arts Hostel Program for 



both beginners and more advanced 
students. They will also conduct an ap- 
preciation workshop focusing on im- 
provisation. 

Tickets are available at the door. Admis- 
sion is free to Summer Hostel students, 50 
cents for summer session students, $1 for 
senior citizens and children, and $2 for the 
general public. 

The performance will be sponsored by the 
UMass Summer Activities program in co- 
operation with the UMass Arts Extension 
Service. 



Soundfield Theatre, a new entertainment 
medium with a strong focus on sound, will 
be performed tonight at 7:30 in the Student 
Union Ballroom. 



The show, which was conceived by 
former UMass student Paul Boliver and 
loudspeaker engineer John Gilliom, 



Soundfield Theatre 

}w entertainment reatures musicians in an adjacent room to solve the problei 



adjacer . 

According to Boliver, who has been work- 
ing on the soundfield concept for about 12 
years, the production is an attempt "to 
the room in which the audience is seated in 
order to control acoustics levels by using a 
soundfield generator. The audience is ex- 
posed to a type of light show, providing a 
"sound and light field." 



m of bad sound in large 
places; it makes the sound be predictable 
to the performer through the electro- 
acoustics lab." 

Folksinger Andy May will perform toniflht 
as well as a student group playing classical 
music and an area jazz group. The show is 
sponsored by the Summer Activities pro- 
gram, and admission is $2.50. 



The 



Leonard Bernstein 



Festival of 



American IVIusic 



at UlVlass 



W»dn— d«Y^ Jun»28. 1978. 



£2ll£giaai 



Concert expenditures probed 



By MARK LECCESE 

B^Mnditures for the Duke Ellington Sprirg 
Music Festival held last May have been 
recorded by the Student Activities Office as 
at least $6,413.76 over the festival's 
allocated budget, according to figures 
released last week. 

Other improprieties in the funding of the 
concert are being looked into by The Stu- 
dent Senate Attorney Ger>erBr8 Office and 
the Student Senate Treasufer's Office. 
All expenditures for the concert were ap- 
proved by Priscilla WAt, who was senate 
treasurer at the tim* the concert was held 
on May 6. 

The inveetigatidh into the expenditures of 
the Ellington festival is being carried out 
"with much-trepidation," according to Stu- 
dent Anomey General Jon Hensleigh. 
"I want to emphasize that we are going 
through this process slowly and carefully " 
Hensleigh said. 

"There is going to be an investigation into 
the exact anrx>unt - the total monetary 
figure - of Priscilla West's signatures We 
want to see what she signed away in rela- 
tion to what she was given to sign away " 
he said. 
There will also be an investigation into 
possible senate auto pool and rented car 
violations and a third investigation into a 
check West signed for $4,778.50, made out 
to a student for 191 dozen tee-shirts. 
According to West, "The expenditures 
toward production of the concert alon«! 
were well under $44,880." The 
Undergraduate Student Senate allocated 
•44,880 to put on the concert. 
"The Spannit units (tarpaulin used to 
cover the stage) and the concessions 
Tioney were where the budget went over " 
West said. 

"Concession expenses would go directly 
to the Duke Ellington Fund. Theoretically, 
with concession money, you break even " 
West said. 

To this date, only $4,844.77 have been 
returned to the Student Activities Office as 
revenue from the concert. In addition to the 
$4,778.50 spent for tee-shirts. $1,932.00 
was spent for programs and $5,443.77 for 
beer. 

In the budget p ass ed by the student 
senate on March 1 for the corKert, there 
was no category for concessions. Th« 
budget directed $25,000 to be spent on 
talent. $7,000 on production. $4,000 on 
publicity, $2,000 on hospitality, $2,800 on 
security and $4,080 on rain insurance. 

West said concession money came out of 
what the Student Activities Office labels a 
.1 account. These accounts are for 
organizations which generate their own 
revenues. 

"If there is a violation h would be that she 



'We are going 
through this process 
slowly and carefully. ' 

—Jon Hensleigh, 
Attorney General 




^^^SiRRS!^ 



Seabrook rally draws thousands 



By LEE BURNETT 

SEABROOK, N.H. - For the local 
residents it was a chance to see 
behind the cyclone fence surroun- 
ding the Public Service Company 
property. Jeffery Weintraub of near- 
by Hampton Falls said. "From the 
road all you can see are the cranes. I 
came because I'm just curious." 
Approximately 12,000 residents of 
the New Hampshire seacoast ac- 
cepted the offer of State Attorney 
General Thomas D Rath and the 
Clamshell Alliance to participate in a 
legal rally on Sunday in protest of the 
controversial nuclear power plant 
here. They came all day long, 
bringing with them cameras, lunches 
and children to a section of the 700- 
acre site near the partially completed 
twin 1 150 megawatt reactor. 
The locals were greeted by a small 
boomtown of 6,000 anti-nuclear ac- 
tivists camped in the woods who 
came to demonstrate and exhibit 
various alternative energy projects. 

The activists, including a Western 
Massachusetts contingent of 500, ar- 
rived at Seabrook on Friday and 
camped iri the woods. On Saturday 
they marcned from all directions to 
Route 1 then down one of the access 
roads to set up camp and prepare ex- 
hibits for the following day. 

Exhibits included solar ovens for 
baking bread, garbage composting, 
solar stills, a windmill that pumped 
water, a fan powered by photovoltaic 
cells, which convert sunlight directly 
into electricity, and numerous 
literature fables. 

There were many street shows in- 
cluding the Bread and Puppet 
Theater, dancers, musicians, a one- 
man guerilla theater routine by a 
member of the Union of Unconcerned 



Many came to see 

beyond the fence 

around the plant site 



Scientists, and participatory 
games. 

There was a full schedule of 
speakers and singers that lasted until 
dusk. Pete Seeger, Barry Com- 
moner, and Amory Lovins, who were 
at the UMass Toward Tomorrow Fair 
last week, highlighted the rally. 
Lovins said the nuclear industry is 




dead but like a brontosaurus that has 
ganglia in its tail, will thrash around 
for weeks, months, and years not 
knowing it. "The best thing to do 
when you come across a dead bron- 
tosaurus is to bury it with as little 
ceremony as possible." The crowd 
roared its approval. 
Not all were satisfied with the 
weekend activities. Some activists 



were upset that there was no op- 
portunity for the civil disobedience 
that was originally planned. A 
Boston based group, Clams for 
Democracy, held a workshop ad- 
vocating that people remain on the 
site after 3:00 p.m. on Monday, the 
agreed upon time to leave. This 
created an emergency situation with 
which the organization had to deal. 

Affinity groups met and discussed 
this threat to internal discipline, and 
spokespersons from each affinity 
group then gathered to hammer out 
a consensus. 

This meeting overwhelmingly 
discouraged civil disobedience at 
that time because many felt it would 
have destroyed the credibility of the 
Clamshell Alliance, and would erode 
precious local support. 

The Clamshell picked up and 
peaceably left on Monday. 1,700 
traveled to Manchester to conduct a 
silent vigil around the Hillsboro 
County Courthouse, site of the 
Nuclear Regulatory Commission 
Hearings on the cooling tunnels for 
the Seabrook plant. Many regard 
these hearings as the last legal means 
of stopping the Seabrook Nuke. 



overspent her budget in concessions, and 

that's where the money was lost, ' said 

Hensleigh. 
"There was an understanding that there 

would be concessions." Senate Treasurer 

Michael Doyle said. "Concessions is never 

actually a budgeted item." 
Records in the Student Activities Office 

also show that two automobiles were 

rented for the concert, one from May 5 to 

May 9, and one from May 5 to May 10. 

Total cost for the cars, rented through 

Campus Travel, was $189.84. 
"We used those cars to bring people back 

after the show," West said. "I don't recall 

the specifics." 
The cars were also used to transport 

equipment back to the Student Union after 

the May 6 concert. "There was just so 

much. I was down there until Thursday us- 
ing the car," West said. 

West also said she did not sign a contract 
with the student who supplid the festival 
with Duke Ellington tee-shirts. "You just 
don't do contracts with a student, " she 
said. 

The Student Senate Constitution requirat 
that contracts be made out for "the hiring 
of an individual or group for any purpose" 

Records in the Student Activities Office 
show that $569.13 was spent on food arxJ 
liquor for the stage crew. The senate con- 
stitution states that 'No organization shall 
purchase miscellaneous food for their per- 
sonal consumption at any function." 

The stage crew for the concert was made 
up of student volunteers, and th^e 
students were not pakj. The money for the 
food came out of concessions money, ac- 
cording to West. 

In addition, each student group that 
volunteered its services at the concen was 
given a sum of money to put into its Stu- 
dent Activities account, according to West. 
"What they did with that money was totally 
up to them," she said. 

"That's not illegal. Tomnr^ Kerrins 
(former senate treasurer) did it last year," 
West said 

The Union Program Council, one of the 
groups that worked asastagecrew, received 
an authorization from West to spend $300 
on baseball jackets bearing the groups 
name on the backs. 

According to Glenn Goldent)erg, assistant 
coordinator of Student Activities, a total 
report on the expenditures on the concert 
will be out early next week. "We're re- 
going over everything," he said. 

Goldenberg last week set the total expen- 
diture for the concert at $51,393.76. The 
total expenditure figure he expects to 
report next week "won't be any less than 
that," he said. 

Goldenberg also said that revenues for the 
concert are not expected to increse from 
the $4,844.77 figure released this week. 

"I've got to sit down with Michael Doyle 
in his capacity as finance manager to see if 
it looks like there are serious violations of 
the student code, " Hensleigh said. 

"Were a disciplinary hearing to be involved * 
we have got to determine the type of 
judicial board we want. I'm leaning towards 
a grand jury, made up of seven Student 
Judiciary judges," Hensleigh said. The Stu- 
dent Judiciary has never convened a grand 
jury before, according to Hensleigh. 



Notice 

Store Hours 

Both store locations, 
in the Campus Center 
and at the 
Textbook Annex, 
will be 

CLOSED 

on the following dates 
Tues June 27 
Wed Jur:e 28 
Thurs June 29 

for inventory 
Mon July 3 
Tues July 4 

for the holiday 



5Ln}@ 



•t^ '^Sq.o) 



:^ 



carnpus center un^v 0^ ^ass a'^he'st 



^ GililL'^ian, 



iWednesday. June 28, 1978 






Woodbury discusses 
U Mass student affairs 



7 think that over time 
w© are going to have to 

figure out ways to a have 

different kinds of lifestyles 

accommodated. ' 



v^ 



cJnor i, Note: Dr Rob0n L Woodbury, 

who for Two years has been acting vtce- 

• inceMor for student aHairs. is stepping 

• IV7I this weri ----- ^z,,, /j// }^0o(j- 

^-. V wiH be . the Schooi of 

Education. 

8v MICHAEL DORAN 

CoMBgian Thara has bMn talk that you 
might ba convincad to hang around a 
little longer Have you settled whh 
Chanoeior Bromary on this question? 

Woodbury: Yes, I'm leaving as ot July 1 
As you know I agreed to do it for a year It's 
realty not the way I want to spend my life. 
Afii I smed two full years so I think it's 

Collftgian: One of the thir>gs you have 
been puahir>g for in your t«M> years of 
acting Vice ChanceMorsNp haa been 
n on mandatory housing for upper 
classmen Recemty tfw juniors were 
eKempted from marKlatory housing on 
canpus by tt>e trustees. Do you see 
non- mandatory housir>g for 

sophomores in the future at UMasa? 
Woodbury: I think eventually yes Already 
we are more mandatory than any other 
public institution in the Northeast I just 
think that that's more and more difficult to 
justify from almost any point of view. 
That s one of the things that I'm pleased 
happened. We talked about it for years. 
Once you do that you cant back up. 
I think that will also change the emphasis. 
Rather than having so many people re- 
quired to live in the dorms and fighting like 




Wednesday. June 28, 197», 



mad to get out, you can emphasize ways of 
attracting them. And I expect in the future. 
*or ciAample, that we would figure out ways 
to attract graduate students We figure that 
halt the graduate students aren't married, 
don't have families what they would like is 
a ^ • ^ where tf>ey can 

stw not that great out 

there. I think that over time we are going to 
have to figure out ways to have different 
kinds of lifestyles accommodated. 
Collegian Is anything along tf>e8e Knas 
in the planning stage P 
Woodbury: No. There's a lot of talk. 
Thwes a lot on paper about getting a more 
rational renovation plan. If we can get state 
money. And I think we're going to. That 
will make it possible to at least somehow 
stay even. We're in the situation now 
where we're not spending enough on 
maintenance and repair for a plant thtit 
sue. so we lose ground 

i think a lot of people m the Con-imunity 
Development Center and elsewhere have a 
lot of ideas - some sper^l stuff for 
freshmen, things to do with career planning 

Barbara Burns (of CD C) for a long time 
has had the idea rf turning one of the 
dorms into an international house. Maybe 
sometime it will be fiscally possible to do 
these things. This is one of the largest dor- 
mitory systems m the country, so from a 
management point of view it is enormously 
complex What we have to do is figure out 
ways to deal with it on a smaller level to at- 
tract people 

Coll e g ia n: When is the state nier>ey you 
merrtiorwd fortf>coming? 



Woodbury: We've already gotten it What 
we're doing is asking for planning money 
which is always the first step to gening 
capital outlay for renovation. Brooks arwl 
Knowlton will be the first two done My 
thinking is that we ought to get into a plan 
where three dormitories a year will be 
renovated. One will be taken out of service 
for a whole year, and two will be taken out 
for a semester or a summer. So that over a 
fifteen year cycle you turn over the whole 
group of dormitories Of tho-^e three, two 
will be financed bv the state ar.d one by the 
trust funds themselves. There also ought to 



be a permanent full time planning dimen 
sion in the dorms so that there will be some 
people spending all of their time planning 
for renovations, 

CoMegiatt: The dorm trust funds you 
speak of are aat up ao that the student 
living in the dorms are paying off tne 
bonds vUiich buiK tf>e domra, and also 
paying for the maintenance and 
renovation. Will junior exemption, 
vUiich contains the poaaibiHty of nwny 
students leavir>g the dorms, affect yow 

TURN TO PAGE 4 . 



(1 0,000 ( 

By LAURA KENNEY 

One would never think that a stu- 
dent would feel out of place in 
Amherst, but this weekend proved 
that to be a misconception as 20,000 
people from all over the world con- 
verged upon the UMass campus to 
partake in a marriage encounter. 

The Fourth International Worldwide 
Marriage Encounter Convention, an 
annual event sponsored by the 
Catholic Church, drew flocks from 
Japan, Ireland, France, Korea, 
Spain. Canada and the United 
States. Many couples wore matching 
outfits and the several thousand 
Canadians in attendance wore white 
hats upon which was pictured the 
encounter symbol of a heart above 
two uniting rings encircling a cross. 

This convention marked the largest 
encounter weekend ever held. Other 
annual conventions had been held in 
New York and Los Angeles 

Worldwide Marriage Encounter is 
defined as "a movement devoted to 
the renewal of the Sacrament of 
Matrimony in and for the Catholic 
Church. " Friday the 10,000 couples 
after registering in the Campus 
Center herded to Alumni Stadium to 
participate in a Vespers service. The 
service was performed by the light of 
10,000 flames, as each couple held a 
1 andle 

Saturday each couple was assigned 
to five workshops iyd by various 
priests and couples, examining the 
family and its relationship to modern 
society Saturday mght there was a 
parade and rally at the stadium, and 
Sunday several speeches were held. 
The weekend culminated in a gala 
mass at the stadium where all 20,000 
received Conimunion. 
About 8,000 of the encounterers 
were housed in dormitories on cam- 
pus, including the Southwest 



'^-QttegUm 3 



towers, the Sylvan dorms and the 
Northeast Area dorms. About 2,500 
stayed in campers and tents, and the 
remaining couples stayed at the 
homes of encountering couples from 
areas within a 100 mile radius, in- 
cluding Boston and parts of Connec- 
ticut. 

The event "generated large 
amounts of rrwney for many different 
departments" on campus, according 
to UMass Conference Services Coor- 
dinator Lyria Frank. 'The University 



UMass 



Store did record business, the 
Physical Plant hired workers over- 
time, and the dining commons served 
5.200 people six meals each," she 
said. 

Frank said about 35 extra people, 
mostly students, were hired by Con- 
ference Services for the week before 
and the weekend of the event to 
prepare the dorms, put up signs, and 
"to do some of the running around." 

Several translators were also hired 
for the weekend to aid non- English 
speaking couples. 




A group of paopla from "The Lar>d of LirKX>b>" 
stove-pipe hats in memory of Abe at left, and at right 
a woman claps cymbols and sings at Sunday's 




Eucharistic Mass during laet waekand's WorM Wide 
Marriage Encourrter Conventk>n. (pfKitoa by Debbie 
Scfwfer) 



Elderhostel leads to course experimentation 







New vice chancellor 
to be named 

Chancellor Randolph W. Bromery earlier 
this week said he would be making a deci- 
sion on a replacement for the position of 
vice chancellor for student affairs by the 
end of the week . 

The position has been vacant for two 
years, and Robert L Woodbury has been 
acting vice chancellor. He is leaving that 
position this week to go on vacation and 
will return in the fall as a faculty memkjer at 
the UMass School of Education. 

Bromery is considering two candidates for 
the post, both of whom were suggested to 
him by a search committee. Sandra J. 
Clark from Florida International University 
and Dennis Madson from Colorado State 
University are the two final candidates. 

'I have a few more telephone caits to 
make, but I should make my decision about 
Thursday," Bromery said. 
\ -LAURA KENNEY 

Employees file suit 
against University 

The University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority has voted to return $288,400 to 
the Amherst campus that it has overcharged 
over the past seven years, according to 
Student Government Association Co- 
President Robert Dion. 



The money was overcharged in what is 
called the Project 12 area, which is Sylvan 
. residential area. 



The UMBA had been charging the 
Amherst campus for the exact amount due 
according to the Management and Service 
agreement, according to Dion. 

But the UMBA had t)een getting $41,200 
from the Department of Housing and Ur- 
ban Devolopnr>ent for the past seven years, 
and this money was not going to the 
Amherst campus, but was instead 
deposited in a bank account in Boston, ac- 
cording to Dion. 

The UMBA has now voted to give this 
surplus to the Amherst campus. 

Funds to pay for Project 12 have been 
coming from student rent fees. "I'd like to 
see this money from the UMBA go into 
rebates, but I expect the trustees will put it 
into renovations, " Dion said. 

-MARKLECCESE 

Animal science prof 
charged with cruelty 

A UMass assistant professor of veterinary 
and animal sciences last week was charged 
with cruelty to four pure-bred Morgan 
horses. 

The Massachusetts Society for the 
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals early last 
week received a complaint about the 
feeding of horses belonging to Peggy A. 
McConnell, 47, who lives on Shutesbury 
Road in Pelham. The MSPCA then obtained 
a search warrant from Hampshire 
District Court to confiscate the animals, 
and officials took them to an MSPCA-run 
farm for horses in Methuen. 

According to officials, the "horses were 
"emaciated and poorly cared for." Mc- 
Connell had as^d the society to destroy 



three of the animals, but Officer Richard 
LaBlond, who works out of the Springfield 
MSPCA office, said the horses could be 
brought back to health with the proper 
care. 

McConnell has worked at the UMass 
Paige Laboratory, which is concerned with 
animal diseases, and has been employed by 
the University for 20 years. 

UMBA to pay back 
$288,400 to campus 

A group of temporary staff members at 
UMass has filed a suit against the Universi- 
ty, charging it with falsely classifying the 
workers and failing to comply with the state 
law requiring the University to give benefits 
to all its employees. 

The employees, who are known as 03' 
workers, are paid out of the 03 portion of 
the state budget used to hire temporary 
staff. According to Alan Kurtz, an 
organizer of the suit, there are several peo- 
ple, both professional and clerical, who 
have been working under the 03 label for as 
long as seven years. 

"Look into just about any office on cam- 
pus, such as the Bilingual Collegiate Pro- 
gram or CASIAC, and there's probably 03 
workers who have been working for several 
years without benefits," Kurtz said. "We 
(the suit organizers) think it's illegal; the 
money should be for people who are tem- 
porarily hired, people on honorarium and 
consultants," he said. 

A heanng for the suit has not yet been set. 

-LAURA KENNEY 



By LAURA KENNEY 

Dozens of elderly persons each week 
come to UMass in order to participate in 
the Elderhostel program, an experimental 
summer workshop series in its second year 
on campus for persons over the age of 60. 

This year the University created an off- 
shoot of Elderhostel, called the Summer 
Arts Hostel, which involves "a wide range 
of age groups, from 80's to 8," according 
to Beverly Kratochvil, campus coordinator 
for the Elderhostel and Summer Arts Hostel 
programs. 

Both programs offer courses "from 
psychology, history and sociology to arts of 
all kinds, including visual arts, mime and 
theatre,'" said Kratochvil Participants in 
the Elderhostel can choose from three 
course offerings, while those in the Sum- 
mer Arts Hostel can choose three out of 
nine courses per week. 



RmHERI 



SERVICE 



Hanskin 



Those attending the programs can stay for 
up to three week-long sessions, and have 
the option of living in a dormitory during 
that time. Kratochvil said so far this sum- 
mer about 10 persons have registered per 
week for the Summer Arts Hostel, and up 
to 60 per week have registered for 
Elderhostel. She said the entire month of 
July is "booked up"" and that most of the 
spaces for the month of August are filled. 
Many of the participants stay in Enr>erson 
dorm in the Southwest Residential Area, 
and next month Crampton dorm will also 
be used. 

Both the Elderhostel and the Summer Arts 
Hostel are self-supportive organizations, 
but, according to Kratochvil, "'just about 
everybody on campus had helped out in 
some way; we"ve had a lot of coopera- 
tion."' There are performances every 
Wednesday which are sponsored jointly by 
the hostel groups and the Summer Ac- 
tivities Program, and many of the per- 
formers are weekly artists in residence who 
give workshops as well 

Elderhostel was created four years ago by 
Martin Knowlton in Durham, N.H. "'The 



program has been very successful; a large 
number of people have been involved, " 
Kratochvil said There are currently 
Elderhostels in six regions of the country, 
and this year is the first that the program 
has been held nationwide. 

Many people come for the Elderhostel 
workshops from as far away as Florida and 
California, according to Kratochvil. She 
said participants travel from hostel to hostel 
throughout the six regions, and that she 
knows of a couple who "consider 
themselves gypsies; they've sold their 



home in Florida and sc>end their sumnners 
traveling and attending the hostel pro- 
grams." 

She said about three-fourths of the par- 
ticipants, who are mainly in their late SCs 
and early 70"s, come in couples, and the 
majority of the rest are single women. 

Elderhostel residents in the past few 
weeks have participated in several campus 
events, including ihe Toward Tomorrow 
Fair. They may also attend the Leonard 
Bernstein Festival of American Music 
events for a discounted senior citizens' 
rate. 



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Collins to be candidate] 
for re-election to House 



. Rep. James G. Collins, D-Amherst. 
last week announced his candidacy 
for re-election to the state House of 
Representatives. 



Collins, 31, is a 1968 
graduate who majored in 

anianfa }^q SCrved ' 



UMass 
political 

- as Student 

Government Association president 
during his years here. 



science. 



In his third term as a representative, 
Collins is vice-chairman of the House 
Committee on Education as well as a 
member of the Committee on 
Energy. In addition he is a memt>er of 
the Commission on Mental Retarda- 
tion and the Commission on the Per- 
forming Arts. 

Collins is also co-chairman of the 
Special Commission on Unequal 
Educational Opportunity, which is 
trying to reduce the reliance on the 
property tax to fund local education. 




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Co edito 


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LAURA M 


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Co editu 












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LECCESE 


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clll<KJ»!f 








LAURIE A WOOD | 


Gr<i|)t)ir^s 


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BARBARAS 


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SUBSCRIPTIONS 



On campus and oH campus 



f? SO Summor 



I 



Mail delivery to University campus and Amherst H'ca same 
hiisiness day ot publication All other areas ol Massachusetts 
delivery following day Outside of Massachusetts allo^ 2 •>! 3 ilavs 
delivpiy Send check or money order to Ihe Maasachusatts Sum 
mmr Collegian Room t13 Campus Center Umvc'Sity of 
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vVP<»k foi deltvi'v to start 

The otiire of the Massactiusetts SuiTYner CoNagian is located 
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The Massachusetts Sunwner CoMogian is accepted for mail 
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Second class postage IS paid in Amherst Masssachusetts 01003 
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rnllo aiani 



* Woodbury 

CONT. FROM PAGE 2 

plan by reducing the anxKjnt of nx>ney 
in these trust funds? 

Woodbury. It's very hard to know for sure 
if the juniors are going to leave en masse or 
not. The first year is fall off and after that 
nK>st colleges have found that people come 
back in on a voluntary basis. I think we've 
got an insurance policy in that this first year 
we ve got a slightly larger sophomore and 
freshman class than usual. 
CoHegian: Let's hope that all the 
juniors don't decide to stay and we 
have another group of bedless 
freshmen like last year. 
Woodbury Let's hope, Yah, you know the 
problem last year was that dammit, there 
were 500 people without beds and 400 
empty beds in the system. And that's what 
really bugs me - that's just lousy planning. 
Co M Bgian: How did that happen? 
Woodbury: Because the empty beds were 
located m all women's dorms, and there 
you have 500 standing outside waiting for 
beds Now, there are creative solutions, 
but we won't get into that. . .What we real- 
ly need though is some good planning. 




Collegian Arxjther 
dormrtory livir>g is 
tion for a stiKlent 
the dorms they 
toward making 



thing going on wtth 

the current negotia- 

for tt>e space in 

Do you see rrxyves 

the dorms non- 



mandatory ar>d having some type of 
lease or comract as moves toward an 
abandonmem of the old kiee of tf>e 
university as surrogate parent and 
adoption of a more mature relationship 
for the two? 

Woodbury: Let me answer that in two 
parts. First is, it seems to me that making 
the dormitories non-mandatory is just 
recognizing the facts of modern life. If you 
want to say that this is an abandonment of 
in loco parentis, fine, that may be. The 
lease thing - the question I deal with there 
is: what is a more effective. way to have the 
dormitory system managed, so that people 
who live there get responses to things they 
need, and the people who are trying to run 
it can do it in a way that they can be held 
responsible for the management. It seems 
to me that some kind of contract or a lease 
IS a modern way of doing that. 

Let me go into another thing about in loco 
parentis. I think there is a misreading of 
what happened in the so-called abandon- 
HDent of it. Rather than there being a 
changed relationship between older people 
and younger people, it was in fact aban- 
doned. The most characteristic thing that 
happened in the late sixties in the univer- 
sities and the dormitories is that the older 
people just disappeared. Faculty withdrew, 
older people in general just withdrew from 
the scene. I don't think that was the ap- 
propriate response. I think we ought to 
have faculty nnembers, and older people in 
general, heavily involved in student life, but 
with a changed kind of relationship. 
CoKegian: What would you do to effect 
this re- immersion of faculty and older 
people into student life? 
Woodbury: I don't think that we can. What 
you have at larger universities is - I don't 
care if you have collective bargaining or not 
- a much narrower view of what a person's 
job responsibilities are. On this campus at 
least this has been fed in recent years by a 
very difficult situation with the faculty - no 
pay increases for four years, and unioniza- 
tion - a general feeling of lower moral. So I 
think it's going to be a hard thing to do. But 
there are a number of faculty who would 
reinvest themselves in this type of thing. 
Collegian: Even with appearance of a 
union and the advent of collective 
bargaining? 

Woodbury: Let me say a few things about 
collective bargaining. I think your first 
round of collective bargaining, going for 
your first contract, is a very painful pro- 



cess. It engenders a lot of ill feeling. Not 
just here, but it's been true with universities 
and industry. Very messy. No one is quite 
sure about how to play the game; there are 
different levels of professionalisnh that you 
have to deal with; .!! feelings are almost in- 
evitable. 

In future negotiations that stuff becomes 
much more regularized. People begin to 
become much more professional on how to 
do it, they begin to understand the other 
side's point of view and world view, and it 
becomes a recognized and professional 
kind of process. In the first instance it's not 
like that, and that leads to all kinds of 
things happening that don't make much 
sense. I think that's part of what we saw in 
the past year, and I think that's almost in- 
evitable. Good collective bargaining 
depends on good, professional negotiation 
on both sides of the table. 
And I think there's two things in the 
future. Things will become much more 
regularized and people will have a much 
better understanding of what is possible 
and what the other side is going to do. Se- 
cond, I think the question is to what extent 
the process can become what everyone 
can accept as being creative for the Univer- 
sity. In industrial collective bargaining is ac- 
cepted by both skJes, strikes are avoided 
and the worst excesses are passed on to 
the consumer. 

Collegian: As with the industrial 
modal, wM the worst excesses of a 
univarsity contract be passed on to tha 
consumer, v¥ho is the student in this 
caae? 

Woodbury: I don't buy the student as con- 
sumer. I think that a student is a lot of 
things more important than a consumer. 
CoMegimn: Like what? 

Woodbury: You're engaging in a process of 
collaborative inquiry and learning at its 
best, and that is the core of what the pro- 
cess is about. And that is not very 
analogous to purchasing milk. The ques- 
tion you're askir>g is what is the fallout on 
students from collective bargaining? That's 
very hard to read. There certainly is not an 
identity of interest when it comes to 
students with either the administratior or 
the faculty. 

Collegian: Does this no n- consumer 
role you assign to students alow tham 
to partake in tf>e bergaining proceaa? 
Woodbury: There has tc oe a way for this 
to happen. I'm not s»;re what it is. I don't 
think that students can be deemed on a 
campus level as a union engaging in collec- 
tive bargaining. I suspwct, I don't know yet, 
that the notion of having students present 
at the table may or may not work as a 
method of introducing another into the pro- 
cess. It may be that administration and 
faculty will more or less confine themselves 
to bread and butter issues, and much of the 
life of the university will go on as before. 
C oMegian: What do you see shaping up 
for the fan? 

Woodbury: I think in many ways we've hit 
bottom this year. There has been a large 
turnover of administration, trustees, etc., 
and people have gotten used to the fact 
that the golden age of higher education is 
over. And yet this place is fundamentally 
pretty damn good. I think in the next year 
or so this place is going to start coming to 
life again . 



f/43S 



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no 6 00 Mon Sj! 



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V 



6 Colle g ian. 



iWednesdav. June 28, 1978 



L eonard Bernstein: 
a brief biography 




Leonard Bernstein was bom in (.awrence, 
Mass., on August 18, 1918, and grew up in 
Boston. He grduated from Harvard Univer- 
sity in 1939, and continued his studies at 
the Curtis Institute with Fritz Reiner, Ran- 
dall Thompson and Isabella Vengerova. 

His summers were spent at Tanglewood, 
as student and assistant to Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra conductor Serge 
Koussevitzky. 

Engaged by Artur Rodzinski as assistant 
conductor of the New York Philharmonic in 
1943, Bernstein made his debut with the or- 
chestra on November 14 of that year, 
replacing Bruno Walter in a nationally- 
broadcast concert. 

In the years following, Bernstein served as 
music director of the New York City Sym 
phony (1945-1948), was head of the con 
ducting faculty at the Berkshire Music 
Center '1961 1956) and appeared as guest 
conductor with the New YofK Philharmonic 
and the Israel Philharmonic 

Named music director of the New York 
Philharmonic in 1968, Bernstein was the 
first American bom and trained musician to 
attain such a post During his long associa 
tion with the philharmonic, he conducted 
rriore concerts than any other conductor in 
its history, and, m 1969 he was given the 
lifetime title of Laureate Conductor. 

In additin to conducting the New York 
Philharmonic, Bernstein has conducted 
most of the world's leading orchestras, as 
well as the Metropolitan Opera in La Scale, 
Milan (the first American ever to conduct 
there), and the Vienna State Opera. 

Acclaimed as a corr>poser, Berr^tein has 
written three symphonies, "Jeremiah," 
"Age of Anxtety," and "Kaddish, " the 
"Serenade" for violin and string orchestra, 
"Chichester Psalms" for orchestra and 
chorus, the ballets "Fancy Free" and "Fac- 
simile," the or>e-act opera "Trouble In 
Tahiti." ar>d the score for the film "On The 
Waterfront " 
For the Broadway theatre, he has wrinen 
the scores to "On The Town," "Wonder- 
futtown," "Candide." and "West Side 
Story." 
Many of these works will be performed 



during the Bernstein Festival here at 
UMass 

His recent works include "Mass." which 
opened the Kennedy Center in Washington 
in 1971. and "Dybbuk," a ballet which had 
its premiere performance in 1974 by the 
New York Ballet. 

A retrospective of Bernstein's work was 
presented last spring in Israel during a two- 
week, nation-wide Bernstein Festival, 
organized by the Israel Philharrrxsnic to 
celebrate the thirtieth anniversary of his 
first concerts in Israel. Last August, the 
Carinthian Summer Festival in Austria 
presented the first European festival of 
Bernstein's music. 



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f odof Viofanwt and th« F«n.v«i Orch^tr. cooductad by Roban Gut 



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A yearly 
Festival? 

We are trying 

to build 

a festival 

tiiat honors 

and displays 
American arts. ' 



By MARK LECCESE 

"This year we can find out whether there 
is indeed a market for an arts festival in 
Western Mass.." Fine Arts Center Director 
John Jenkins said earlier this week. 

"The festival will run this year and p>erhape 
for nnore years," he said. "We are trying to 
build a festival which honors and displays 
Anr>erican arts." 

This year's Bernstein festival will feature 
mostly music. Some dance is also in- 
corporated into the programs through the 
dancers in "West Side Story" and the ap- 
p^rance of the Hartford Ballet Company. 

"The visual arts take a little longer to buikJ 
in," Jenkins said. 

The idea of honoring Berr^tein in a 
festival of American music is not a new 
one. "The idea was tossed around a couple 
of years ago, before the Fine Arts Center 
was even open," according to Assistant 
Festival Director Barbara Aldrich. 

"Bernstein is a native son of 
Massachusetts, and he also is represen- 
tative to many people of American music. 
He offers quite a diversity of American 
music, going from the Broadway stage to 
)azz to chamber orchestra music," Jenkins 
said. 

"It seems appropriate to honor Bernstein. 
He's had a long association with the state; 
he studied at Tanglewood with Koussevit- 
sky. It seemed natural because of his im- 
pact on the public - he's been so much of 
an influence on American music," said 
Festival Music Director Robert Gutter. 

"He's the biggest Anr>ehcan compoaar 
alive today," Aldrich said. 

Performers at the Bernstein festival in- 
clude composer, conductor and pianist 
Lukas Foss, violinist Eugene Fodor, mezzo- 
soprano Florence Quiver, and jazz artists 
Thad Jones, Mel Lewis, Maynard 
Ferguson, Woody Herman, and Buddy 
Defranco. 

Foss and Bernstein have been long-time 
colleagues, studying together at 
Tanglewood under former Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra Music Director Serge 
Koussevitsky, according to Jenkins. "They 
con>e from the same musical ilk," said Gut- 
ter. 




Foss will be conducting ournstein's Sym- 
phony No. 2, "Age of Anxiety" with the 
festival orchestra on July 14. 

Eugene Fodor, a young violinist who has 
won both the Tchaikowsky Violin Competi- 
tion and the Paganini Violin Competition, 
will be performing Bernstein's "Serenade" 
for violin, strings and percussion with the 
festival orchestra on July 8. 

"Fodor was very excited about having a 
chance to perform the Serenade.' He's 
never performed it before, ' said Gutter. 

"Fodor is a young and exuberant per- 
former who fits into the kind of festival of 
young American music we are having," 
Jenkins said. 

The program for the Bernstein festival also 
includes several jazz artists. 

"Bernstein has been influenced by jazz - 
it's always there in his music. It also 
seemed appropriate that the festival extend 
past 'legit' music," Gutter said. 

"If you're going to talk about American 
music, you have to talk about jazz," 
Jenkins said. 

The Bernstein Festival Orchestra will be 
made up of a nucleus of musicians from the 
Springfield Symphony, of which Gutter is 
music director. "We've invited students 
from alt around the East Coast music 
schools," said Gutter. 

Gutter said he looks forward to con- 
ducting the festival orchestra. "It's a great 
challenge, and it's a lot of fun. One does 
not have the 'blahs' with this type of 
music," he said. 




Drummer Mel Levwis (left) and tnjmfMMr Thad Jonaa (right) brino thetr worlds 
fomous quartat to the Fine Arts Carrtar Ju»v 9. Ptaniat Larry WiUm arnJ bMaiat 
Ruf»^Raad roimd out the Thad Jor^arMal Lewis quartet, a jau irwtitution corv 
■idarad by many to play some of the vMxtd's finest iaz2. 




Florenca Qulvar, mezzo-soprano for the Metropolitan Opera, will per- 
form vMth the festival orchestra on July 23 She wiU perform Bemetain'a 
Symphony No. 1, 'Jeremiah." 






Robert Gutter, rrmisic director of the Bernstein Festival wiU conduct ih« c«.«n^i 
Or^as^ .n performance, with Eugene Fodor. Florence qI^^^hS!^ 
Balat. Gutter, bom and educated in New York (SThas basn I^^LI^^!^ 
the Springfield Symphony Orchestra since 1970 °^ "^'^ ^"^ "^-^ dirwnor of 



Bernstein Festival of American Music 



Mon. 



3 



West Side Story. 

Fine Arts Center Con 
cert Hall, 8 p.m. 



Tues. 



4 



10 



11 



Wed 



5 



Thurs. 



29 



West Side Story, 

Fine Arts Center Con 
cert Hall. 8 p.m. 



Fri. 



30 



6 



12 



Woody Herman (left) bnngs his bana to the Fine Arts Center this Sun- 
day UMass professor Fredrick Tillis (right) will have a composition per- 
formed in a world premiere by Florence Quivar and the festival orchestra 



17 



18 



Trouble In Tahiti 

and songs by Bern- 
stein, Fine Arts Center 
Bezanson Recital 
Hall, 8 p.m. 



13 



19 



Trouble In Tahiti 

and songs by Bern- 
stein, Fine Arts Center 
Bezanson Recital 
Hall, 8 p.m. 



Trouble In Tahiti 

and songs by Bern- 
stein, Fine Arts Center 
Bezanson Recital 
Hall, 8 p.m. 



West Side Story, 

Fine Arts Center Con- 
cert Hall, 8 p.m. 



West Side Story, 

Fine Arts Center Con- 
cert Hall. 8 p.m. 



7 



14 



20 



Trouble In Tahiti 

and songs by Bern- 
stein, Fine Arts Center 
Bezanson Recital 
Hall, 80. m. 



Lukas Foss and the 
Festival Orchestra, 
Fine Arts Center Con- 
cert Hall, 3 p.m. 



Eugene Fodor and 

the Festival Or- 
chestra, Fine Arts 
Center Concert Hall, 
8p.m. 



21 



Trouble In Tahiti 

and songs by Bern- 
stein, Fine Arts Center 
Bezanson Recital 
Hall, 8 p.m. 



Ticket Information 



Tickets for all events are now available at the Fine Arts 
Center Box Office and at all Ticketron locations. A $2 
discount on single tickets to UMass students with a 
valid Spring or Fall 1978 ID is made possible by a grant 
from the UMass Arts Council. All other students and 
•senior citizens are eligible to receive a discount of $1 per 
ticket. Holders of discounted tickets must show ap- 
propriate ID'S at the door. 



Tickets to all performances except Trouble In Tahiti are 
$7, $6, and $5. All tickets to Trouble In Tahiti are $6, 
with the same discounts applicable. 

Tickets are also available through the mail." Mail orders 
nrujst include a check or money order and a self- 
addressed stamped envelope. All correspondence 
should be addressed to: Fine Arts Center Box Office, 
»-ine Arts Center, University of Massachusetts, 




Hartford Ballet. 

Fine Arts Center Con- 
cert Hall, 8 p.m. 
Trouble In Tahiti 
and songs by Bern- 
stein, Fine Arts Center 
Bezanson Recital 
Hall, 8 p.m. 



Trouble In Tahiti 

and songs by Bern- 
stein, Fine Arts Center 
Bezanson Recita 
Hall, 3 p.m. 
Gala Fasti vl Ball, 
featuring the Festival 
Orchestra, 10th floor 
Campus Center, mid- 
night buffet on 11th 
floor. 



Amherst, Mass., 01003. 

Series tickets are available. Special group or party 
block reservations are available if arranged in advance at 
the box office. 

For information, telephone the Fine Arts Center box 
office at 545-2511. The box offica is unable to accept 
telephone reservations. ^ 



10 Collegian 



■Wednesday, June 28, 1978 



Fest opens with 
'West Side Story' 



"West Side Story, one of Broadway's 
most popular musicals, will open the Bern- 
stein Festival of Anwrican Music tomorrow 
night with an 8 p.m. perfornrtance in the 
Fine Arts Center Concert Hall 

The music to "West Side Story " was writ- 
ten by Leonard Bernstein, lyrics by 
Stephen Sondheim, book by Arthur 
Laurents and the play was originally con- 
ceived and choreographed by Jerome Rob- 



"West Side Story" was first produced on 
Broadway in 1967, where K ran for more 
than two years. In 1962 the motion picture 
version of "Weal Side Story" won nir^ 
Academy Awards, including Best Picture. 

After its triumph on Broadway. "West 
Side Story" has been playing around the 
world for more than 20 years, where it has 
been celled a new kind of folk opera, with 
the beat of cool, "nwdern jazz, ' and a 
story of love and violertce amid teenage 
gangs in the jungles of the New York 
slums. 

The action-filled plot is a retelling of 
"Romeo and Juliet" against the 
beckground of tt>e dark, rubbish strewn 
•treats of New York City. 

The Bernstein Festival production of 
"West Side Story" is being directed by 
Sidney Eden. Choreography is by Richard 
Jor^ee, arKl Robert Gutter is musical direc- 
tor. Alan Light is producer. The Festival Or- 
chestra will accompany the production. 

Featured in the cast will be Ed Dixon as 
Tony. Dixon was associated with Leonard 



Bernstein as a tenor soloist in the Kennedy 
Center of Performing Arts production of 
"Mess," and has appeared on Broadway in 
"No No Nanette, ' the "Student Pnnce," 
and "Knickerbocker Holiday." He recently 
appeared Off Broadway in "By Bernstein," 
a collection of little known Bernstein songs. 

Featured as Maria will be Gloria Zagiool. 
Zaglool appeared on Broadway in "Desert 
Song," recently toured New England in the 
Chateau DeVille production of "Oliver," 
and has appeared as Aklonza in "Man of La 
Mancha" with Allan Jones and Fiddler on 
the Roof " with Zero Moetel. 

Bernardo will be portrayed by Peter Oliver- 
Norman, who recently appeared as the Tin 
Man in the National company production of 

The Wiz. ' On Broadway, Oliver Norman 
has been seen in "Heik). Ooliy," 'Maggie 
Flynn," "Two Gentlen>en of Verona," and 
was in the recent production of Leonard 
Bernstein's "1600 Pennsylvania." 

Joel is Riff Jackie Lowe. AnKa; Teri Gill, 
Rosalia: Noreen Bartlin, Anybody's; Kurt 
Ida, Baby John; and Michael Danek, Ac- 
tion. 

In addition to the opening night, June 29 
performance, "West Side Story" can also 
be seen June 30, July : and 3, 8 p m. in the 
Fine Arts Center CorKert Hall. 

Tickets for "West Side Story" are: UMass 
students $5, 4, 3. ger>eral public $7, 6, 5, 
senior citizens and other students $6. 5, 4. 
Tickets are now on sale at the Fine Arts 
Center Box office ar>d all Ticketron loca- 
tions. 



Jadde Lowe ea Anita end P«er Ollvw Norman as Chk» v-lll spgeer 
beginning tomorrow night In the Bemetein Fe«h«l production of weei 
Side Story '(starff photo by MaddieFudle) , 



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with The Rene Profit McLean Quintet 

June 29 7:30 pm Metawampe Lawn 



MIONrrE SHOWS 
FRIDAY and SATURDAY 



hefd 



great jazz 
woody hermon 

and , 

the young '" - . , r^ 

thundenng JUly ^, 

\\, , / and the 

,"X ^uddy 

'■tS.'5'^-c^efrcinco 

quartet 



''Hjr ferguson 



\^ 



July 9, 
1978, 




and hisorchest£Q 

■i* 




and the 

thod 

jones- I T.V \ 

mel lewis quartet 

all events will begin at 8 pm 

tickets S 7 06. 55 

'jpnor.s students S5, b4. 33 .... 

other students. senor citizens .6 'o ^^4 

tickets available at the fine arts center 

box oft'ceand oW ticketfon locatKDns_ 

leonord bernsteTn fesfl\^l 

of cm^riccri rrustc jutk? 29-Mv ^a N''^ 

fine crts ceriter 

LnNAzrsity of masSochusetts , 

otcmhcJTst [u 

dcr \i^. festive* drecia \\ 

ftbert gutter rrijsic director 




K June 29, 30 July 1 and 3 - 8 pm 

west 
story. 



based on a conception o* lerome robbins 

music by 

leonard bernstein 

lyrics by 

Stephen sondheim 

book by 

arthur laurents 





entire Ofiginai ooducfion 
directed ond chofeograptTed by 

Jerome robbins 



directed by Sidney eden 

choreography by richard jones 

musical direction by robert gutter 

tickets S7, S6 S5 

umass studenfo $5, S4. S3 

other students, senior citrzens S 6, S 5. S4 

tickets available cA the fine arts center 

box office and all ticketron locations 

leoixrd bernsteh festival 

of cmerican nnusic jine 2<H<y 2a 1978, 

fhe crfs certer 

LrY\^2rs(tv of nnassachLeetts. 

crt cmherst 

cter Ig^it festi\<J drector 

iDbert gutlei: music drecia 




Free concert tomorrow 
features Persuasions 



The Persuasions, a nationally 
known and popular singing group, 
will appear tomorrow at 7.30 p.m. 
witti the Rene McLean Septet in a 
free concert to be held on the 
Metawampe Lawn, behind the Stu- 
dent Union building. 

In case of rain, the concert will be 
held in the Student Union Ballroom. 

The Persuasions, a five man group 
of singers who perform their songs 
with no instrumental back up, is 
composed of Joe Russell, Jerry 
Lawson, Jimmy Hayes, Herbert 
"Tubo" Rhoad, and Jayotis 
Washington. 

The group, which has been recor- 
ding together since the t960's, has 
recorded eight albums; A Capef/a 
We Came to Ptay. Street Corn^ 
Symphony, Spread the Word We 
Still Ain't Got No Band. More' Than 
Before, and / Just Want To Sing 
With My Friends. 

The Persuasions have also recorded 
with Stevie Wonder and Don Mc- 
Clean, in addition to singing back up 
lo such artists as Phoebe Snow 



David Esses, Les McCann and Ellen 
McElwein. 

Their latest album, Chirpin' 
includes a tribute to Jackie Wilson' 
"To Be Loved," "Women and Drink- 
ing." Sarn Cooke's "Win Your Love 
(For Me)," and a musical depiction of 
sJavery, "Johnny Porter." 

Rene Profit McLean, the son of 
legendan^ jazz artist Jackie McLean, 
•8 considered by many to be one of 
today's most gifted young sax 
ophone players In addition to play- 
ing both soprano and alto sax with 
his father, McLean has worked with 
the Tito Puente Band, and with 
Lionel Hampton, Doug Carn, Sam 
Rivers, and Woody Shaw 
In 1975, McLean recorded the 
album Watch Out. and was featured 
on Doug Carn s Revelation. Woody 
Shaw's Love Dance, and the Cosmic 
Brotherhood's New York Calling 
McLeans side-men for the concert 
will be Oliver Beener on trumpet, 
Cunis Fuller on trombone, George 
Avoioz on drums, Stafford James on 
base. Calvin Brown on guitar, and 
Walter Bishop on piano 






p a n u ifc fc 



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! a» f»«aiii>i n^t-^fiii, ,. 



AutoforS^ 



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fair 549 3661 BO 




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mer occupancy. Pool, pkg., Air cor>d. Near 
Shopping Amherst Motel and Apts. Rt.9 
opp Za yro s 256 8122 



Onm/Tvw day ha^ wW i y homemade « 
solar HW heater. Sunderland, M/F no 
phone pis write Coflegtan, 113 C C UM 
Amherst 01003. 



,. Work 

at home no experience r>ecess8ry - ex 
cellent pay. Wrrte American Service 8350 
Park Lane , Suite 127, Dallas, Tx 75231 



R«nt a mini rafrigarator for 

Poolside, Patio, Summer home $10 a 
month plus tax Spirit Haus Refrigerator 
Rentals 338 College St Open 10 am - 11 

pm Daily 256 8433 or 253-5384 

Apt. A>«ilabie nowf Sublet June- Aug, 
Fall option. 2 Bedroom semifurnished for 
$150 on bus route, pool, laundry, near 
stores, etc For more info call Belle 
549-5317 



money? Volunteers 
wanted for study of taste and eating 
patterns Must be female between the 
ages of 18 and 30 Call Randy F/ost 
Smith College. 584 2700 lext. 757) or 
586 3205. 



Audh 



ToSubht 



FM car stereo casaatte deck 2 

Jensen co axial b 2 Realistic speakers Sold 
car no reasonable offer refused Call Brad 
253 7462 



your ear • we'll pierce them 



Now through August 31 , room in Puffton c^jck y% h T 

Villiage, $75/ month plus utilities. Call Sue flYr^ t i. ^ 

orLaura at 549- 1338 or 545-3500 ^f® ^°o^. ^ ^^® ^^"^^ Silverscape 

f:orS^ ^Hi^ ^ '^'""""' ^* '"^'^''' 

Tires and Wheels 



5 Firestone Steel belted radials HRTB15 e^t, ^. .>>, .^ . . 

mounted on mags $375 253 7086 »-oik gurtar for beginners, especially people 



Large quamrties of ice available. Ice or 

blocks. Spirit Haus Liquors 338 College st. 
Open 10 am 11 pm. daily 256 8433 or 
253 5384 . 

1975 Kav^MsaW GS 100. $465.00 or 80 1000 
Original miles. Call 533-5765. 

LJLJ ■ II t n H H Ifc 



who have tried before and gave up. 
Tuning, basic chords, righthand pat 
terns, and timing for learning songs from 
records or song sheets. Also opportunity 
to play and sing informally with us in 
between lessons Near UMass Phone 
Bill Dorris 253 5784 



- * 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 m n 11 n 1 1 1 1 1 ' 1 1 T JbMgnmr 





Fenton's has all Brand 
Names for the Best 
Selection in Town. Adidas, 
Spalding, Davis, 
Rawlings, Dunlop, Wilson, 
Bancroft. 



377 Main Street, Amherst 



1 f^iiitf^HIL 





'^v»^w*^... ..fJiJ^!J iSJ.4^?H!§ 



Colle gian. 

Editor's Note: Thm is the second of 
• two-pen series on the history of 
student publications at what has 
been known over the past one- 
hundred-and-eleven years as 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
Massachusetts State College, and 
the University of Massachusetts at 
Amfterst. 

By CHBftYL CZERNIAK 

Apparently new ideas for publica- 
tions had not yet been exhausted by 
fornrwr students of MSC because in 
1948, The Pow Wow was designed 
with a completely new purpose in 
mind - "to promote school spirit in a 
campus sadly lacking in coopera- 
tion." 

The nickel paper advocated joining 
fraterT>itiee and asked for cooperation 
among the frats. It also contained a 
sports section (which cheered the 
teams on to victory) and a "Squaw's 
Page" (which urged the college gala 
to join sororities and, in general, to 
get involved I . 

The Row Wow soon ran out of 
tobacco for its peace pipe and its 
smoke signals were extinguished 
before it could live out the semester. 

Again a rebirth of an oldie but 
goodie occurred on the college cam- 
pus In 1964. The Yahoo, a wild W% 
version of The Squl> was hatched. 

The one-liners, cartoons, funny ar- 
ticles and stories were plentiful, yet 
The Yahoo was much more 

The advertisements themselves 
became a part of the hysteria that 
was The Yahoo. In an ad for the 
Aqua- Vita restaurant, the headline 
rem6 " Enjoy Home Cookir>g at its 
Best." The cartoon below pictured a 
man (complete with safari hat) 
seated in a large pot placed upon a 
fire. Two cannibals clothed in jur>gle 
garb stood over the nr>an. One read 
the cookbook as the other added just 
a pinch of salt. 

An ad for Jeffrey's Beauty Salon 
showed a cartoon of tt>e mythical 
Medusa and her hair of snakes. 
"Time to See Us" read the headline. 

Another ad demonstrated the 
"Unusual Service" provided by the 
CoHege Service Center A snake 
charmer sat by the gas pump and 
played his flute as the gas hose 
danced toward the car's gas tank . 

No issue of the humor magazine 
would have been complete without 
the "Yahoo Queen Photos of the 
giris selected for the honor were 



Wednesday, June 28, 1978, 



iWednesday. June28. 1978 



splashed across three or four pages 
and were quite often the subjects of 
the centerfold, in typical Playboy 
style. 

Most of the "queens" were fully 
clothed in sweaters and skirts and 
merely relied on their sultry glances 
to entice their male admirers, 
although a few of the beauties were 
scantily dressed in just a sweatshirt 
or a swimsuit. 

The giris' names, where they lived, 
their ma)ors and their special in- 
terests were anrwng the information 
usually provided adjacent to the 
photos. 

The Yahoo, however, like so many 
other of the University's publica- 
tions, was destined not to survive. It 
met its final defeat in 1966 - rK>t 
because it was unpopular, but 
because it was sacreiigious. 

The Item that put the magazine in 



Over a century 



hot water was a four panel cartoon 
depicting a priest and a chalice. In 
the final section of the drawing, the 
priest pulled a rabbit out of the 
chalice and exclairr>ed "Shazam!" 
The beginning of the end, this car- 
toon led to a Massachusetts State 
Senate investigation and eventually a 




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withdrawal of funds by the Student 
Senate. 

The Yahoo did not go down 
without a fight. In fact, another 
publication sprang up in 19(66 to pro- 
vide emergency first aid. The Free 
Press crusaded solely for the 
freedom of the press, especially for 
college publications and in particular, 
for The Yahoo. 

The mottos of the one to four page 
tabloid were "Only a Free Press Can 
Be Responsible" and "A Free Press 
and a Free Society Rise and Fall 
Together." The publication failed to 
survive even as long as thecondemned 
magazine it was struggling to save. 

Au Present (What's Happening), a 
CoNegian attempt at a general in- 
terest magazine, appeared in 1966 as 
a supplement to the daily. 

The magazine focused on music, 
books, drugs, the arts, sex, fashion 
and sports. The two &-page booklets 
on file discuss drugse late sixties wasa 
time of unrest 

in this country and the publications 
of the times did not fail to reflect this. 
Ye Moiltwf of Voices, a community 
antiestablishment newspaper 

crept out of the woodwortc in Nov. 
1967 

The bimonthly paper did not 
hesitate to use profanity in its ar- 
ticles, criticized all aspects of the 
government, especially its Vietnam 
policy, and focused on the hippie 
movement. 

Regular criticisms of allegedlyn. 
Readers 

were invited to* write in and dicuss 
their sexual problems in "Hegel's Sex 
Column." 

The paper's comp>osition was most- 
ly editorial, with a bit of poetry and 
some very impressive artwork . 

The paper's appearance did not go 
over smoothly. The first issue of the 
25 center was banned at the Stu- 



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special $205.00 
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special 109 95 
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FROM UUR "LOCKER ROOM" 
^ Gym Shorts $3.95 

Ocean Womens Jet Skin Swimsuits $20.00 

Brook l^ides Villonoya Jogging Shoes $19.00 

Mens Ocean SwimsuVs $6.50 

Tiger T Shirts $3.75 

Pony Marathon Jogging Shoes $19.95 

Cotton Sweat Suits pants $7.10, shirts $6.95, hooded $11.95 

Fastrak Marathon Joggers Running Shoes $17.50 

Also available Puma Tennis Shoes from $12.75-$26.95 

Fastrak Basketball .Shoes from $19.95-$22.00 

* Peloton Inc. 

1 E Pleawnt Amherst M9-6904 
open every day. Thurs till 9 PM 



PfcL 



SOUNDFfLD 



T-; 



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Y 



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atto sa; 
9Uft;ar 
flut:e i, 
piano 
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johm \A/eeks 
paul boiiver 
soundfield g^enerator 
^ "■ ' raymond blanchet; 
pam bricker 
andy may 
spider 



...A LABORATC3RY 

FOR A rVIENA/ IN/IEDIUM OF EXPRESSIOTM ! 

WEDNESDAY JUNE 2878 

t XSQ 7:30pm at UT/lass - the Student Unican Ballroom lA.SC 



v-O^fl-ft 



WORLD PR6M1£Re ^ 

-U - fir- .3^^ - 9 - .S>$?^ O^J 



of students ' ink 



I 



dent Union because it was profane, 
and several people were arrested in 
Greenfield and Northampton on 
charges of distributing obscene 
material when they tried to sell the 
publication. The paper lived to a ripe 
old age of one and a half. 

The Exit, a different type of 
newspaper appeared on campus in 
1968 to fill the "void on the UMass 
campus." After witnessing the fall of 
The Yahoo and Caesura's struggle 
to survive, the new publication 
sought to plug the gap. 

The weekly tabloid, published in 
connection with the Collegian, was 
composed entirely of feature material 
such as poems, short stories, essays, 
f jctual feature articles, a calender of 
events, cartoons and drawings. 

A 1968 WMUA music survey 
published in the paper included 
songs by Bobby Goldsboro, the 
Monkees, the Beatles, the Bee Gees, 
Elvis Presley, Strawberry Alarm- 
clock, Simon and Garfunkleand Paul 
Revere and the Raiders. 

The Exh. after taking on a rTK>re 
magazine-like appearance in the fall 
of 1968, made its exit from the cam- 
pus in November of that year. 

All was quiet on the UMass publica- 
tion front in the early seventies. 1975 
brought however a new paper to the 
steps of the University. The 
newcomer. Called Outfront, was a 
community newspap>er that vowed to 
"present news, issues and events 
from a respor>sible radical view- 
point." 

Outfront felt that the interests and 
views of feminists, veterans, gay 
people and Third World people, 
among others, were being slighted 
by the current publications and 
sought to offer ar» alternative. 



A typical article included in the 
monthly depicted a child, a victim of 
starvation who was so sickly thin, his 
ribs could have easily been counted 
through his flesh Beside the photo 
stood a quote from former Secretary 
of Agriculture Earl Butz. The state- 
ment read, "The doomsayers say we 
are already in trouble. I say this is 
false, that most of the world's people 
eat better than in any other time in 
history. We are not in a food crisis in 
this country or in the world." 

Outfront perished shortly after its 
second birthday. 

Student publications have obvious- 
ly become a tradition at UMass. 
Some lasted years while others never 
got beyond the first issue. 

Some of the more inconsequential 
publications of yesteryear include 
The Aggie News Letter (1917), an 
alumni publication designed to keep 
the class of 1917 in touch; The 
Kickoff 11930), a sports newspaper; 
The Plague (1939), a summer 
publication of announcements; 
Take-Off (1943), a newspaper for 
future cadets; Context (1960), a 
Christian newsletter; and ikhana 
News (1962), a publication of an- 
nouncements in connection with the 
Student Union. 

Today the publication tradition con- 
tinues as UMass hosts a vast variety 
of newspapers and magazines pro- 
duced in all shapes and sizes and for 
all purposes. 

The student publications of today 
reveal a much more aware student 
population. International and na- 
tional news and powerful editorials 
replace much of the gossip and 
passivity that characterized the 
publications of yesterday. 




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FRI - SAT 11a.m. - 12midnight 



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Yet the UMass students of today 
share many of the same problems as 
their predecessors (i.e. faculty, ad- 
ministration) If they were still 
around. The Razor Blade would 
probablystillincludeinits'Rulesfoshalt 
have no seconds at the 



hash house; " The Pow Wow would 

still condemn the apathetic attitude 
of most college students; and Aggie 
Life would still demand the repair of 
the flooded concrete walk that has 
probably to this day never been fix- 
ed. 



JjjW IN THE BERKSHIRE MOUNTAINS ^#1 

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THE IDEAL SUMMER SPOT FOR A CONCERT BOSTON GLOBE 



i4 Coi!e gian. 



iWednesday, June 28, 1978 



SpORTS 



By JERRY ROGERS 



Frisbees fly at U Mass 



Tom Field of Michigan combined a fifth 
place finish in distance throwing and a tie 
for third place in frisbee go: take the 
Men's Overall titto at last ^veekend's 
Yankee Flying Disc Open held at UMass. 
Carolyn McCrory of Canada and Jackie 
Entwistle of Martha's Vineyard tied for first 
place in the Women's Overall competition. 

McCrory took second place honors in 
distance and finished fourth in frisbee goH 
while Entwistle combined a first place finish 
in golf with a sixth place in distance. 

Competitors came from as far away as 
Florida, the Midwest and Canada to vie for 
points in the first North American Series 
Tournament ever held in Amherst. Fifteen 
"series" tourr^ments are held throughout 
North America over the course of the sum- 
mer Competitors attempt to win prize 
money and accumulate points needed to 
receive an invitation to the World Frisbee 
Championship held in the Rose Bowl. The 
series tournarrwnts are sponsored by the 
International Frisbee Association and two 
point events are held at each tournament. 

Jim Hemck of Wellesiey Hilts and Jimbo 
Morgans of New Jersey tied for second 

KBCe in the Men's Overall competition with 
ichael Wohl and Rourke Trive4l, both 
from New York City, tying for fourth. 
Suzanne Lempert of New York City, Janna 
Machwart of Michigan and Mary Green 



wood of Canada finisheo in third through 
fifth places respectively in the Women's 
Overall competition. 

The tournament was hosted by New 
England Frisbee Athletics and primarily was 
organized by Paul Bauer, Steve Cort>in ar>d 
Oaryl Elliott. Bauer and Elliott have taught 
frisbee in tf>e Physical Education Depart- 
ment at UMass. Five hundred dollars in 
prize money was awarded to the top 
finishers in frisbee golf, distance and overall 
comc>etitions for men and women. 

With suprisingly sunny weather and little 
wirnl, Trivell played two rournls of golf on 
Sunday at 112, 26 under par, over the 
UMass Frisbee Golf Course. Frisbee golf is 
similar to ball golf and players throw from a 
tee, attempt to stay on the fairway, and try 
to hit a natural object and hole out. 

Different Frisbee discs are used for throws 
which require varying degrees of distance 
or accuracy and which may be helped or 
hurl by the wind. Many different throws, 
including rollers, are also utilized by the 
golfers The substitution of wire baskets for 
the natural objects usually used as holes on 
the UMass course necessitated the use of 
vertical putts rather than straight throws 
when close to the hole 

Michael Cawley of New Jersey finished 
second t>ehind Trivell in men's frisbee golf 
with a 23 under par 1 15 Brian Eure of New 
York City and Morgans were loined by Den 
nis Loftus and Field at 22 under par 116 to 
term a four way tie for third 



IM tennis in 2nd weeic; 
Softball playoffs to start 



ByGENEGRZYWNA 

In ttw second week of intramural tennis 
action in the Ashe league, Steve Oahl 
defeated Bob Gamache iwin by forfeit. 
WBF), and Philip MfcSweeney (6 1, 6-0). 
Dick Lindgren remained undefeated with a 
WBF over Gamache and a 6-4, 6-3 victory 
over Vincent Watson Watson defeated 
Mc Sweeney 6 2. 6^, ar>d Bruce Morra on a 
WBF In the Borg League, Ray Ricketts 
stomped Steve Fox 10-2, Walter Howard 
defeated both Fred Alibozek (6-3, 5 7, 6-3) 
and Steve Fox (6-1, 6-0) Allen Patrick had 
an easy time with David Phoenix 10-2. 

In Women's League Play (Casals), a 
number of nruitches have been played. 
Karen Wielgus remains undefeated with 
wins over Kathy Thonoas (10-8), Ann Koski 
(10-4), Marabeth Clapp (1Q3). and Judy 
Simonds (10 1) Kathy Thomas won two 
matches over Koski (10-4), and Elizabeth 
Matthews (10-2). Mary Jane Quinn 
defeated Simonds (10-1). After two weeks 
of play, the undefeated players remaining 
are Dick Lindgren (Ashe League); Ray 
Ricketts and Walter Howard (Borg 
League); and Sharon Wielgus and 
Marabeth Quinn (Casals League) 

Last week's article failed to mention a fifth 
team in the American League, the Space 
Cadets, made up of present and former 
rr>embers of the UMass lacrosse team. The 
Midnight Ashcans of the National League is 
a team organized through the Psychology 
Departnnent, and the Potted Planters (who 
¥vefe omitted) are a team from the Plant 
and Soil Science Department. 

In Softball action the week of June 19th, 
Monday's games were rained out. Tues- 
day's games found English whipping the 
Bureaucrats 18-5, ar>d RarnJom Walk 
squeezing by the Space Cadets 7-6. 
English's pitcher and also the team 
manager Jack Shadoian struck out seven 
Bureaucrat batters. Their offerwive attack 
was led by Jack Weston (three hits), Gary 
Aho (two hits), Bart Sides (triple and home 
run), and Shadoian and Michael Wolff (two 
hits apiece). The losing Bureaucrats had 
two hits each by David Tomkin, Brian 



Sullivan, and Glenn Goldenherg. 
In the other game Tuesday nigh* Random 
Walk came up with two runs . their final 
time at bat to offset a three run homer by 
Mickey Menna t^lat had given the Cadets a 
three run leao. John Malayeff had a two 
run homer in tf>e sixth to bring Rarnlom 
back to within a run. Steve Fundakowski 
and Bruce Morra had two hits for the Ran- 
dom team; Menna, Randy Krutzler, Jeff 
Spooner, and Rat had two hits for Space. 

Wednesday night s games resulted in a 
15-4 victory for the Ashcans over RRM and 
the Potted Planters got an 18 12 win over 
SBA The Ashcans RRM game was a bat- 
tle of unbeatens, while the other encounter 
was t)etween two teams that had not won a 
game yet The Ashcans were led by Dan 
BIythe's four hits, and Randy Cornelius 
chipped in with three Jay Safier had two 
triples, Brian Stagner (two hits, one triple). 
Cliff Konold and Wayne Carey, two hits 
each For RRM, Craig Pulliam had a homer. 
Brad Brandts and Tom O'Connor (two hits 
each), and Coach Joe Scanlon had three 

hits 

The Planters' pounding of SBA was pretty 
well balanced. Brian Silva and Victor Raboy 
with four hits; Paul Willing, Dave McKen- 
zie, Bruce Edwards, and Dan DiGioconr»an- 
drea with three apiece The only bright spot 
for SBA was Maury Haliiday's four hits. 

Thursday's action brought the Space 
Cadets their first win with an 11-4 beating 
of the Bureaucrats, and the Sharks snatched 
a 3-2 win from English. Pat Whelan, the 
Shark's pitcher, had a one hitter. The 
Shark onslaught was led by Jay Clark's and 
Mike Doyle's (triple) two hits. Michael 
Wolff had English's only hit. Idaho Ringle 
had three hits including a triple for Space; 
Rudy Krutzler contributed three hits in- 
cluding a hustle double. Brooks Sweet had 
a triple, and Steve Telander had three saf- 
ties. 

Playoff action should be starting right 
after the Fourth of July. Any softball teanr« 
interested in entering the second summer 
session action should stop by the In- 
tramural Office for further information. 



Notices 



WORRIED ABOUT HIGHER RENTS? 

Come to a meeting of tenants on Thurs- 
day June 29 at iS) p.m. at the Bangs 
Community Center Crafts Room. Childcare 
provided. 

HOUSING EXEMPTION COMMITTEE 

There are two (2) openings this summer 
on the Housing Exemption Committee. For 
further information, contact the president's 
office, 430 Student Union, 545-2129, 
before July 3. 



L SO SEARCH 

Anyone interested m sitting on this 
search please contact the Legal Services 
Office board before noontime, Friday, June 
30 Phone number is 545-1995, office in 922 
Campus Center. 



JOIN NOW. 

Amherst area National Organiztion for 
Women plans to hold a meeting July 5 at 7 
p.m. at the Jones Library in the Amherst 
Room. All people welcome. For more in- 
formation, call Robin at 549 5434. 
LADIES CHAIN DANCE 

Friday, June 30, Ladies Chain will play 
for a Contra Dance at the Grace Church off 
the common in Amherst Center. 8 11 p.m., 
admission is $2. This is a benefit for the 
Amherst Survival Center located in the 
school next to Watroba's in North 
Amherst. The center provides free food 
and clothing, and food and clothing dona- 
tions are always welcome. The center is 
open Tuesday thru Friday, 10-4, and Satur- 
day, noon-4. For further information, call 
549 3968. 



While Michael Cawley was grabbing his 
second place finish, his wife Barbara was 
taking third place in women's frisbee golf 
with a two round total of 138. Greenwood 
was three strokes ahead of Cawley and 
took second with a 135. Entwistle won the 
event with her score of 132. 

In the nrten's distance throwing competi- 
tion, Michael Wohl of New York City threw 
his 1 19 gram disc over three hundred feet 
with only a slight trailing wind to take first 
place. Wohl edged out Jon Cohn of the 
Cornell University championship ultimate 
team. Cohn took second with a throw of 
nearly 290 feet. Herrick grabbed third 
place, just behind Cohn. 



Lempert captured the women's distance 
title throwing well over 230 feet. Carolyn 
McCrory and Janna Machwart of Michigan 
finished in second and third places, respec 
lively. 



AMHERST CYCLE SHOP 

ISi Tti<ii)l« St. 
$49-5729 

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21 Plttfint $1. 
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BIKES, 

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et the rest 
is Best 

253-9051 



65 University Drive 






Wednesday, June 28, 197B. 



-*'— ^ADULT ENTERTAINMENT" 

Majestic Cinema 

84 Cottage Street (Rie. 141) 

Easthampton, Massachusetts 01027 

Tel 527 2346 

Jane 88 - July 4 

^ 7:50 

--• • 8:80 

Air condltloaed 
under ai apt edmitt^a 



Collegian 



Recipes for salad days 






et cetera 
copy copp. 

TYPING & 

CflFYING 

Call 549 0566 

233 N. Pleasant St. 
Amherst Carn.iqe Shops 



By DON LESSER 

Summertime is here, along with ripening 
gardens and coming heat waves. How can 
you take advantage of an overplanted 
garden without spending more time than is 
necessary in the kitchen? Well, salads are 
one way and marinated vegetables are 
another. 

Everybody knows how to make a salad, so 
I won't waste your time telling you to peel 



Food 



store bought cucumbers because the skins 
are waxed to make them shiny or to drain 
lettuce thoroughly before putting it in your 
salad bowl. What you might like to know 
ii' out are some dressings. 
Ti.H simplest way to dress a salad is to 
dribbi;' olive oil and wine vinegar over it. 



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PREPAAE FOR: 



T* Qmm 



■MAY 



Our (yroed range' of programs provides an umbrella Ol testing know-how that en- 
ables us to otter the best preparation available no matter which course is taken — 
Small classes iau9ht by SK>iied instructors • yoiuminous home-study materials con- 
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of class lessons and study of supplementary materials • mter-Branch transfers • 
Opportunities to make up missed lessons • Low hourly cost 



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National Medical A Oemai Boards • 
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COME VISIT OUR CENTER 

264 N Pleasant St 
Amherst, Mass 01002 

(413) 253 2260 




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EDUCATIONAL CENTER 



I 

GBHtEST PREPARATION 
SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938 



AVAILABLE: GOOD PAYING JOB THAT'S STIMULATING 
JOB: GOOD STUFF ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE 

GOOD STUFFis a nationv>/ide service which 400 universities have contract- 
ed to distribute at the first of fall term to residence hall students. Account 
Executives must be at each campus for a day while the school distributes its 
GOOD STUFF kits. 

You will drive to each of your nearby participating universities to spend a 
day with housing officials helping them coordinate and distribute GOOD 
STUFF Your job is full time for about five weeks, your training will be with 
2-3 others also taking the job. and your salary is $170 week (plus travel 
expense money) You can likely be back for your first day of fall classes if 
you^are still in school 

G06d stuff is developed by 13-30 Corporation which also publishes for 
students Nutshell America. Graduate and 10 other magazines. 

To quickly receive information, call collect to Rick Wingate or Ed Smith. 
13-30 Corporation 505 Marke\ Street, Knoxville. TN 37902. (615) 637-7621 



|ueK5 Saloon 

Amherst, (Massachusetts 



nmHERST's 
#1 HRPPY HOUR 

MON - FRI 4pm - 7pm 
WED 4pm - Closing 

Come for a drink 

Stay for liiHHcr 

"IT'S WHERE 

THE flCTION IS" 




sprinkle >vith salt and freshly ground pepper 
and toss it iround In the bowl. You can use 
any oil from Mazola to Walnut, any kind of 
vinegar, store ground pepper or dried herbs 
but things i.ke oli«/e oil and wine vinegar 
aren't just snobt}ei . 'hey do taste better. 

If you put these ingredients in a small bowl 
and whip them around with a fork, you'll 
have what is basicaly a vinaiqiette. 

Vinaigrette 
Mf cup oil 
^^cu^jnegar 



'/7 tsp dry mustard 

''? tsp paprika 

1 clove garlic, minced or pressed 

salt and p>epper 

Whirl in a blender or whip with a fork. For 
variations, add: 

1 tsp of basil, oregano, tarragon, dill fresh 
or about Vj tsp dried 

Or, instead of the rest of the spires, add: 

2 TBS dijon mustard 

3 cloves garlic, pressed or minced. This one 
IS better made in a blender. 

or 

4 lb. crumbled Roquefort or blue cheeM 
1 tsp dry mustard 

You can also marinate vegetables in thme 
kirKJs of dressings, either overnight in the 
refrigerator by just barely cookir>g them in 
the marinade. Cut into bite sized pieces any 
' '^er, broccoli, car- 
• '15 (small ones left 

^holel, artichokes (remove the choke by 
cutting in quarters and pulling out the hairy 
tufts in the center!, string beans, squ^h or 
potatoes Bnng to a t>oil in a 2 quart 
saucepan: 
V; cup oil 
1 cup water 
' I cup vinegar 

) cup wine (or t}eer or use % cup extra oil 
.md a few TBS lemon juice or extra vinegar 
instead I 

3 cloves garlic, peeled 
1 tsp of basil, thyme, oregano or tarragon. 

Add the longest cooking vegetables, like 
cauliflower, carrots or string t)aans first. 
Bring to a boil again, add the rest and cook 
until just barely tender. Let cool, covered, 
in the marinade and store in the 
refrigerator. The leftover maririade makes 
an excellent salad dressing 

Another simple dressing that is not made 
with oil is a yogurt-based raita. A raita is an 



Indian salad that has oeen mannated for 
several hours in a spiced yogurt. Yogun will 
cool off hot pepper afterburn better than 
anything else and if you are making (or 
eating) Indian or Mexican food and you OD 
on the hot stuff, a tablespoon or two of 
yoyurt in the pan or in your mouth will ab- 
sorb most of the heat. A raita I am fond of 
is: 

2 thinly sliced cucumbers 
1 thinly sliced onion 
1 green pepper sliced in thin slivers 

Place in a bowl and mix with: 
1 tsp cumin powder or cumin seeds that 
have been toasted in a hot frying pan, like 
sesame seeds, until you can smell the 
spice. 

1 tsp curry powder 
cayenne to taste 

12 TBS chopped coriander leaf or mint 
' pt) 

Add enough yogurt to cover ( '/» 1 quart) 

lid marinate for a few hours in the 
rufrigerjtor. Pour or spoon off any liquid 
that may have formed, sprinkle cayenne or 
curry powder and serve. 

This kii'd of dressing also makes a good 
inannade for broiled or barbequed chicken 
with the addition of a few spices 

In :i dry frying pan toast: 
1 tsp curry powder 
1 tsp cumin powder 
' ■ ' tumeric 

*p coriander (grourKll 
/4 tbp cinnamon 
1 clove 

Stir and cook for a few minutes and add to 
a blender containing: 

1 chunk ginger twice the si/e of a marble, 
peeled and sliced 

2 3 cloves garlic, peeled and cut in half 
1 onion, quartered 

ijreen p>epper. cut m chunks 
a few coriander or mint leaves (opt) 

'/> qt. yogurt 

Blend until smooth and pour over a 
chicken that has been cut in pieces and 
placed in a glass or ceramic t>owl Let 
marinate for a few hours to a couple of 
days. The longer you let it soak, the 
stronger the flavor will get and the chicken 
will get more and more tender. Broil or 
place on a bart>eque rack, coated lightly 
with the marinade, and cook for 10-15 
minutes on a side or until tfie juices are 
clear when you prick the thighs with a fork . 
These do not have to be that complicated; 
you can leave out everything but the cumin 
in the raita and the garlic, ginger and curry 
powder in the marina'^o arni it will still taste 
good. 



Sounds...and Stuff like that 



By MARIO A. BARROS 

Music, music, music, the public can't 
seem to get enough of it and the labels 
can't seem to get enough of it out there (in- 
to the marketplace). This relationship, 
however, is a good one for me as I play the 
"voice of taste" and keep therapeutically 
active. 

Quincy Jones has gone to great lengths to 
give us Sounds... Ar>d Stuff Like That. 
With a cast of characters that reads like the 
cliche, "...who's who in R&B today," his 
latest A&M effort has him more like a 
director or coordinator than an artist.. 

His many "hired guns" on this LP include 
Ralph MacDonald, Ashford Ef Simpson and 
Chaka Khan. All four of these "celebs" are 
in a performing and writing role on the cut, 
"Stuff Like That, " a rather funky piece that 
deftly avoids the* expected feeling of an 
overcrowded display window. If this little 
"jam session " gets a little busy at all it's 
well taken (rather than mis-taken) as it's rife 
with the old Motown texture that was a 
result of tracks leaking into one another in 
the less than-splendid Detroit studios. 



their development. While we watch EWI- 
go from the dirty, hurtin' st eets of Chicago 
into its pretty sky<crap<»rs, then off into the 
ozone layer atK)ve it, .'d hate to look up 
after hearing Con Funk Shun's next album 
and have to ask, "Et tu C^n Funk Shun?" 

The latest biy-foot-in-the-door group is A 
Taste Of Honey with the srr«sh single 
"Boogie Oogie Oogie." "Boogie Oogie 
Oogie" has slayed the disco and soul charts 
and has now begun its assault on the pop 
charts. All this activity has cleared the way 
for their debut, A Taate Of Honey (on 
Capitol Records). 

The rest of the LP has midtempo stuff and 
ballads. It also does well to showcase the 
group's talented lead and bass guitarists, 
who are both female. They use them as 
props on the cover, but they prove to be 
much more than that when these ladies 
finger some nasty, if somewhat skinny riffs. 

A good listen to this album will show this 
group to be more than a gimmicky paste- 
up. They seem to t>e a hard-working outfit 
that's hungry for attention. All I can say is 
that if they keep making music like this, 
they're gonna get it. Also, their self- 



Arts/ Music 



With noremaKes on Con Funk Sun's 
"Loveshine," we still have to question the 
ongina' 'y of their material at certain points. 
The glaring example is the title cut, 
"Loveshine." This cut shares vocals, 
rhythm tracks, and even an approximate 
release date with Ramsey Lewis/ Earth, 
Wind & Fire's Sun Goddess. Like Ramsey 
<ind EWF, Con Funk Shun has released its 
:-it;o<?v but noble worship to the Sun God 
iu.s' II. time for his big season. 

\'ostly ballads and midtempo Nubian 
Worship rites, this LP is oh so dose to that 
Maurice White stuff. But wait, just as 
,i,ings start to get fishy, we get "Shake 
And Dance With Me," a cut that's got a 
lew nice hooks and a comfortable, funky 
feel. This is what Con Funk Shun has given 
us in the past and will hopefully give us in 
thP future "When The Time Is Right" is 
cut from the same cloth with a couple more 

II . it.'de Jges. Somemaysaytheirsis'canned 
." but it's still infectious and sweaty 
l.,(iK and a good distance from Placebo. 

The only danger with this group is the 
members' apparent following of EWF in 



contained performance hmts that they d be 
an excellent concert group. 

One step further into the disco scene is 
Don Ray's Garden Of Love (on Polydor). 
Ray is a well traveled Euro-Disco fixture 
that's assisted in both Alec R. Costandinos 
and Cerrone projects. Cerrone has returned 
the favor and produces and plays drums for 
him on this, his first solo effort. To call a 
Cerrone production typical is a mistake as 
he's come across with quite a few textures. 
He not only seems to get the best out of 
other projects (such as Ray, Kongas, etc.) 
but his own works ("Love In C Minor," 
"Cerrone's Paradise," and "Supern^lure") 
have varied enticingly also. 

Ray's LP is very hot. The big cut is "Got 
To Have Lovin' " and it's very reminiscent 
of C.J. & Company's "Devil's Gun." This 
fiery piece contrasts nicely with the Biddu 
styled "Garden Of Love." Much like Bid 
du's "Girl, You'll Be A Woman Soon," it 
sways with an "old country" feel. 

A disco classic by now, this one has 
enough variety to be a nice listening album, 
too. 



J^lilQ 




The City Studio Theatre of Northempton 
will perform Don Nigro's adaptation of 
Shakespeare's "As You Like It" Thursday, 
.July 6, at noon in the U Mass Library's court- 
yard. Raindate is July 7. Admission is free. 

Written as a play within a play, the action 
revolves around seven members of a 30- 
member a>mpany, the remains of an 



SHAKESPEARE ON TOUR 



Elixabettwan theatre troupe, whose stars 
have either died, gone insane or left the 
troupe for other careers. The seven ren^in- 
jng struggle to pull together a production of 
"As You Like " 

The City Studio Theatre of Northampton 
has been on tour for most of the summer 
with this play. 



FilM 



The award-winning "One-Eyed Jacks," 
starring Marlon Brando, will be shown 
Wednesday July 5, at 7:30 and 10:00 p.m. 
in the Campus Center Auditorium. Admis- 
sion is free. The film is sponsored by the 
Summer Activities Program, and is part of 
the Summer Film Series. 



"Mahogany," starring Diana Ross anc 
Billy Dee Williams, will be shov«m on Tues- 
day, July 11, at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. in th« 
Campus Center Auditorium. Admission is 
free. The film is sponsored by the Summer 
Activities Program, and is part of the Sum- 
mer Film Series. 



tIieatre 



The Commonwealth Stage will open its 
summer program of "Theatre In The 
Works " with the new play "Man Propos- 
ing," July 7 and 8 at 8 p.m. in the Rand 
Theater of the Fine Arts Center. The pro- 
duction will be in workshop form. Tickets 
are $2 for students and senior citizer^s and 
$3 for the general public. 



rhEATRE 



The Boston Arts Group Lunchtime 
Theatre will perform Samuel Beckett's ' 'End- 
game" Wednesday, July 12, at 8 p.m. at 
Bowker Auditorium in Stockbridge Hall. 
This will be The Arts Group's second ap- 
pearance at UMms this sumnr>er. 



The performance is sponsored by thf 
Summer Activities Program, and is part of 
the Summer Performance Series. 



Tickets may be purchased at the door. For 
further information, contact Mary Ward- 
well, 416 Student Union, 546-3600 



"The Norman Conquests (Round and 
Round the Garden)", a play by Alan 
Ayckboum, will open the 1978 season of 
the Mount Holyoke College Summer 
Theatre this week. The play will be 
presented through July 8. 

'Tobacco Road" by Jack Kirkiand will 
open Tuesday, July 11, and run through 
July 1 5 at the same theatre. 



The plays wilt be performed in the 
"Festive Tent " on the Mount Holyoke cam 
pus, at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $3, $4, and $E 
for general public, and $1 off the listed 
price for students and senior citizens. 
Tickets are available at the door, or by cal- 
ling &38 2406 

bERNSTEiN 

fEsrivAl 



The Leonard Benstein Festival of 
American Music presents violinist Eugene 
Fodor at 8 p.m., Saturday, July 8, in the 
Fine Arts Center Concert Hall. Fodor will 
perform with the Festival Orchestra, under 
the direction of Robert Gutter. Included on 
the program will be "Symphonic Dances 
from West Side Stor/ " by Bernstein, 
Bernstein's "Serenade" for violin, strings 
and percussion and Ives' Symphony No. 2. 

Jazz artists Maynard Ferguson and his or- 
chestra and the Thad Jones-Mel Lewis 
Quartet will perform in the Fine Arts Center 
Concert Hall Sunday July 9, at 8 p.m. 

Tickets for both performances are $7, $6, 
and $5, with a $2 discount to all UMass 
students, and a $1 discount to all other 
students and senior citizens. Tickets are 
available at the Fine Arts Center box office. 




MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 



VOIUME V ISSUES 



WEDNESDAY JULVi 1978 



Area farmers sell 
'Massachuse tts gro wn ' 







Wednesday, July 5, 1978, 



Protest today in Boston 



iCpllegiag 



No state budget yet; no pay Friday 



By MARK LECCESE 

No University employee will be paid this 
Friday unless the Massachusetts State 
legislature passes a state budget by today, 
and even if a budget is passed, paychecks 
may still not be issued, according to UMass 
Director of Personnel John L. Denyse. 

Deny«e said that if the state legislature 
passes a budget and it is approved by Gov. 
Michael S. Dukakis today, there is a "good 
possibility" that the UMass payroll checks 
will be issued Friday. If the budget is not 
passed until Thursday, Denyse says he 

doubts very much" that checks will be 
issued Fnday. 

Officials of UMass AFL-CIO Local 1776, 
which is represented by the American 
Federation of State County and Municipal 
Employees (AFSCME), said some of the 
members will ride to the State House in 
Boston today to protest the hold-up in the 
state budget. 

The AFSCME represents 30,000 state 
employees, many of whom are planning a 
work stoppage today. Workers from all 
parts of the state will converge on the State 
House in an effort to get the legislature to 
pass the budget so that state employees 
will be paid this week. 

"We're not calling a strike, we're just ask- 
ing people to take some time off and go to 
Boston to tell the legislature to get off tf>eir 
butts and do something for us for a 
change," said Secretary of Local 1776 
Roland Messier. 

According to Messier, there are already 
two buses tfiat will be going to the State 
House from Amherst earty this morning. 
"Whai we're doing is recommending that 
people take the day off. Anyone who wants 
to can jump aboard. If state officials can 
play games, so can we." 

'We want our people to show them 
(legislators) how they feel, show them th«ir 
temp>ers," said Messier. 

The state budget has been held up over a 
controversy about antiabortion language in 
one section of the budget and a debate 
over how to distribute state aid to cities and 
towns. 

After a compromise effort by the State 
Senate failed on Monday, both the Senate 
and the House, where the budget remains 
unpassed, recessed until today. 

Administration officials contacted Mon- 
day said they had no knowledge of any 
UMass employees planning to take part in 
the Wednesday demonstration at the State 
House. 

About 1,200 workers on the UMass cam- 
pus are represented by the AFSCME, ac- 
cording to University officials. One 
spokesman said the AFSCME was made up 
of "non-professionals and non-faculty." 

University Labor Relations Coordinator H. 
Scott Overing said the Local 1776 is made 
up of service workers, secretaries, food ser- 
vice workers, farm workers, and others. 

Overing said the failure of the legislature 
to pass a budget has caused "concern on 
the Dart of a lot of pec^le including myself. 



OANSKIN 



X 




II I Mm.-MI 

Downtown Amhe»«t 



This is tough. It's a hell of a way to run a 
ballgame. " 

"I know we've been in this situation 
before, but it has never appeared to be 
quite as serious as this," Overing said. 

Overing said the state budget problems 
would cause no paycheck issuance this Fri- 
day to "everybody that gets his money 
from the state budget. It's a computerized 
payroll. It will work a hardship on 
everybody equally." 

Paychecks for employees on all three 
UMass campuses are processed here on 
the Amherst campus. 

Overing also said any work stoppage on 
the part of University employees would be 
"illegal." 

Messier said Local 1776 is asking people to 
go to the State House today "if they have 
time on the books; personal time and vaca- 
tion time." 

UMass President Franklin K. Patterson 
issued a memorandum last week to all 
University employees warning them that if 
the state budget was not passed, they 
could expect not to receive paychecks until 
the budget was passed. 

According to Messier, of the people who 
go to Boston today ""each person will ap- 
proach their own legislator" and urge them 
to pass the budget. 

"People ja\\ earned this money. We aN 
have to eat. We gave them work, we 
should get paid,"" Messier said. "This is a 
100 percent thing. All the officers of the 
union are all in favor of this (the demonstra- 
tion). It's what we have to do." 

"Those legislators all had a nice weekend, 
and we're scratching our heads to see 
where our check is on Friday," Messier 
said. 




Over a year in discussion 



Faculty contract settled 



By MARK LECCESE 

University officials and represen- 
tatives from the faculty union reached 
a contract agreement last Friday 
morning at 5 a.m., less than a day 
away from the end of the state and 
University fiscal year. 

The contract is the first collective 
bargaining contract between the 
UMass-Amherst administration and 
faculty. The Massachusetts Society 
of Professors, the Amherst campus 
branch of the Massachusetts 
Teachers Association, has 420 
members and represents the cam- 
pus's 1,200 faculty members in the 
contract negotiations. 

MSP executive board member Larry 
S. Roberts said no details of the con- 
tract could be made public until the 
bargaining team took the contract to 
faculty members for ratification. 



According to Roberts, the new con- 
tract will be for three years, and con- 
tains a raise, which Roberts described 
as "the first in a long time." 

Members of the MSP have been 
bargaining with the UMass ad- 
ministration since last sumnner. The 
MSP was formed in February, 1977. 

Over 270 faculty members withheld 
spring semester grade reports from 
the administration for nearly a nrionth 
in protest of the contract talks. MSP 
officials accused the administration 
of repeatedly breaking off negotia- 
tions. The grades were turr>ed in 
June 20. 

Almost 10,000 of last semester's 
90,000 undergraduate grades were 
not turned in, according to ad- 
ministration officials. The MSP did 
turn in grades for graduate students, 
graduating seniors, financial aid 
students who requested their grades 



be turned in, and any other students 
who requested their grades not be 
withheld. 

Roberts said he thought the facul- 
ty's grade withholding action had an 
effect on the contract negotiations. 
"I certainly think so. There is no 
doubt about this. There was a big dif- 
ference in our amount of progress," 
Roberts said. 

Roberts also said he expects an in- 
crease in MSP membership, now 
that the union has successfully 
negotiated a contract with the 
University. 

The contract agreements reached in 
Worcester Friday also included con- 
tracts for the community colleges, 
the University of Lowell, and the 13 
state colleges. Faculty from 
Southeastern Massachusetts Univer- 
sity were not induded in the con- 
tracts. 








Colle g ian, 



I Wednesday July b, 1978 



Wednesday, July 5. 1978 1 



iirynv^i^tAj, 



Amherst Common Market: 

alternative shopping 



5y DEBBIE SCHAFER 

The only way to get vegetables fresh«r 
than those at the Amherst Common Market 
is to pick them yourself. Ask any local 
tarnrter. The market provides a pleasant and 
economical alternative to supermarket 
shopping during the summer months 

Massachusetts residents pay from 6 to 10 
percent above the national average for 
food, according to the State Department of 
Food ar>d Agriculture, because more than 
three fourths of it is inr>poned from otPm 
states. Every item sold at the Common 
Market, however, is "Massachusetts 
grown... arHJ fresher." and July and August 
are the most bountiful nx>nths there. 

The market is held on the Amherst Town 
Common every Saturday from 8 a.m. until 
1 p.m., and every Wednesday from 2 to 6 
p.m. The season usually runs until early Oc- 




J09i Chang of Chang Farrm in Sunderland 




On tha covar mchard Standar of Waat 
Str«et Farm in Haday holds up frash 



tober, depending upon local interest and 
crop size, the first frost of the season will 
usually close down the market, but as long 
as there are fresh items to sell the market 
will remain open. 

Now in its sixth year, the Amherst Com- 
mon Market was organized in response to 
the energy shortage, inflation, and a revival 
of home gardening according to market- 
rr^ster Eugene Worman It began as an ex- 
pression of "community spirit and good 
fun." he added. 

Tfie rr^arket is supervised and coordinated 
by a Common Market Committee, with an 
established set of rules for vendors. The 
market is run "exclusively for the benefit of 
the residents of the greater Amfverst area," 
according to the rules, and all products sold 
at It must be "grown, baked, or cooked 
within the area by the vendor." 

Each vendor is responsible for setting his 
own prices, but on the whole the market 
produce is a k)argain for shoppers The 
items offered for sale must be 'exclusively 
typical farm or home garden vegetable pro- 
duce and fruits, refined food products such 
as lams, jellies, baked goods, ciders, juices 
and similar products," according to the 
rules. During July and August the market 
offers the greatest variety to consumers, 
typically ranging from organically grown 
hert>s and vegetables to maple s\ rup and 
even live rabbits. 

Most of the fruits and vegetables are fresh 
picked that same owrning and all baked 
goods must conform to state health regula- 
tions, so the buyer is dlways assured of top 
quality. Much of t*"* produce is organically 
grown. 

Space •& allotted to vendors on a first 
come first served basis for a small fee. 
Anyone from the area nrwy register at the 
market on Saturdays or by mail, and ven- 
dors range from backyard gardeners with a 
surplus to professional truck farmers. 

"People are doing it for fun as much as 
profit." said Wornr«n. The people at the 
market are friendly and talkative The open 
air, casual format makes the Common 
Market a pleasant place to be on a Satur 
day morning or a Wednesday afternoon It 
offers top quality focJs at affordable 
prices, and a good time for free. 

You can't say that about a supermarket 




J«on WoodvsArd. 4. from a L^watt farm, 
dtoplays one of tfta 46-60 rabbits raisad there. 





SUMMER READING 

Fiction and Non-fiction 
ENERGY 

* 

ALTERNATIVE 
LIFESTYLES 

* 

HOMESTEADING 

* 

GARDENING 

SOLAR ENERGY 

WIND ENERGY 

* 

FUTURE STUDIES 

* 

BICYCLING Including the new "BICYCLE 
TOURING IN THE PIONEER VALLEY" $3.95 

while you're in the store check out our great film prices 

THE UNIVERSITY STORE 

right in the Campus Center 




Also charge discrimination 

U Mass '03' workers 
sue for status, benefits 



By LAURA KENNEY 

A group of UMass employees labeled as 
'temporary' have filed suit against the 
University, charging it with falsely classify- 
ing them and also charging that the Univer- 
sity has not complied with state law requir- 
ing that alt workers be given benefits. 

The organization of professional and 
clerical workers, paid through the '03' por- 
tion of the state budget, claims that many 
such workers have been considered tem- 
porary employees for as many as seven 
years, working without t>enefits. 

Members of the organization, which was 
formed over a year ago, contend that peo- 
ple at the University classified as '01' 
workers perform many of the same types of 
jobs as '03' workers. Those paid from the 
'01' portion of the state budget are per- 
manently hired and receive benefits such as 
paid holidays and sick davs. 

According to Gail A. Hall, a staff assistant 
in the University Without Walls program 
and one of about 15 suit organizers, the 
problem has been "brewing for a long, long 
tinr»e." She said, "Before there was an '03' 
organization. p>eople didn't have anywhere 
to go" to air their grievances. 

Suit organizers said they tried to obtain a 
list of '03' workers from the personnel of- 
fice last year and also a written policy state- 
ment on the use of '03' funds "in an at- 
tempt to clanfy our present status," but the 
organizers said the office failed to respond 
to their requests. 

"Because the University administration 
has failed to respond to these minimal re- 
quests, the University has thwarted all at- 
tempts to negotiate for any change in our 
status," reads a statement written on 
behalf of the Orqanization of 03 Workers. 



"We were left with no alternative but to ap- 
p>eal to the courts to make a judgment on 
the legality of our status and ultimately to 
make an assessment of damages." 

UMass Director of Personnel John L. 
Denyse said, "For a number of reasons, 
we've been threatened with a lawsuit for a 
while. I really can't comment on the situa- 
tion, because we haven't officially been 
served with the suit, and I haven't seen a 
statement." 

He said he had "no idea how many '03' 
workers there are off the top of my head." 
Suit organizers estimate that there are 
about 500 emp>olyees on campus. 

"The remedy to the situation may not 
necessarily be to reclassify the workers as 
'01', but to give equal benefits," said 
William C. Newnrian, attorney for the 
Organization of 03 Workers. 

Another factor in the suit is a possible 
charge of discrimination against staff 
members working for non-traditional pro- 
grams on campus and programs serving 
minorities and women. Carol Maranda, a 
staff assistant and assistant director of 
academic studies for the Committee for 
Collegiate Education for Black Students 
(CCEBS), last month filed a formal com- 
plaint against the University for such 
discrimination. 

"The rhajority of '03' professionals as op- 
posed to non- professionals work in special 
programs; many work in programs serving 
minorities," Hall said. 

Estelle A. Dugas, a clerical assistant for 
the Bachelor's Degree with Individual Con- 
centration program, said, "Lines are not 
clearly drawn as to whether you're an '01' 
or 03' worker; it depends on when you 
were hired. If you have friends in the ad- 
ministration, you may get classified as '01' 
and get alt the benefits." 



ERA backers to rally In D.C. 



Several Amherst area supporters of the 
Equal Rights Amendment are currently 
organizing a group to attend Sunday's rally 
in Washington, D.C, "to make sure we get 
an extension" on the bill, according to 
UMass organizer Barb Singer. 



■I ON TH( If 






inum m thc scmsHiec mountrins 





PHBLO CRUIsf "^ 

KAT€ TAVLOR 

JUIV 9 S CK) tS 00 «0V J6 SO DRV O SHOUJ 




About 10,000 people from across the na- 
tion are expected to attend the rally, which 
is being sponsored by the National 
Organization for Women. The rally, Singer 
said, is "to show that there are people who 
support the amendment. We want 
(legislators) to get moving on it. Ratifica- 
tion doesn't took good if we don't get the 
extension." 

"Ratlyers must dress in white for visual ef- 
fect and each group must carry a banner 
which can be made or store-bought," 
Singer said. The groups will assemble Sun- 
day morning and wilt march down Con- 
stitution Ave. to the U.S. Capitol. The rally 
wilt last Riost of the day, taking place at the 
Capitol building. 

A bus to Washington for people in the 
Amherst area is a possibility, according to 
Singer, if enough people show interest 
before the end of the week. For more in- 
formation, contact the Everywoman's 
Center in the Goodell building. 

-I AIIRAKFNNFY 



m.L STRA MUSIC INN f€STIVni 

J€RRV J€FF UiniKCR 

JOHN PRIN€ 
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NOW ON SALE 
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IMANCjFSAT TMf X <;PRING» IflO lArfSOFEARTK AMHERST 

nCKSETBON 

BY MAIL SEND CERTIFIED CHECK 
OR MONEY ORDER PAY ABLE TO ATL ANT IC 
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f NCLOSE SELF ADDRESSED STAMPED tNVfcLOPt 
CHILDREN UNDER 8 FR 
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NO PETS NO CAMPING 



•ASSPIKl E Kll? 



j^ 



C INI 



Music INN 



i 

ss 

!S 

M 



Live Entertainment 

& 

Dancing 

7NITES a WEEK! 

Wed - Thurs 

Waiic Fleet 

Fri - Sat 

Crystal Wood 

Sun 

No Strings 
Attached 

Men - Tues 

Skyline 



92MilnSt 
The Florence 9eciDn xiiM^ 
4 MiOT West of Bmtt^ college , Kw. e 

584-7613 



THE IDEAL 



.ENOX MA 



SUMMER SCOT f^OR A CONCtRT 
HllSf T IS 411 G3; ?/00 





People enter the Fine 'Arts Center Concmn HaN last Thureday 
night for "West Side Story, " which opened the Leonard Bern- 
stein Fesdval of Ameiican Music hare at UMaae. Feeth^ of- 
ficials said the play, which ran for four nights, ptayad to near 
capacity audiences each night, (photo by Debbie Schafar) 

Bernstein Fest opens; 
continues withi concerts 



By MARK LECCESE 

The first Leonard Bernstein 
Festival of Annerican Music opened 
last Thursday night in the Fine Arts 
Center Concert Hall with the 
festival's production of "West Side 
Story" playing to a nearly full house. 

The production used both profes- 
sionals and student actors. Profes- 
sionals Ed Dixon as Tony and Jackie 
Lowe as Anita, both Broadway ac- 
tors, were standouts. 

Lowe's dancing and singing on 
"America " and throughout the show 
was very well done, and Dixon 
displayed a talented and controlled 
tenor in hissinjging. 

The play, with music by Leonard 
Bernstein, drew near capacity au- 
diences each night, according to 
David Letters, director of publicity 
for the Fine Arts Center. 

Sunday night, jazz artists Woody 
Herman and His Thundering Herd 
and Buddy DeFranco, clarinetist, 
performed in the Fine Arts Center 
Concert Hall as part of the festival's 
jazz series. 

"West oide Story" was 
choreographed by Richard Jones, 
who is currently associate director of 
the University dancers here at 
UMass. 

The special orchestra for "West 
Side Story " was composed of local 
musicians and students, and directed 
by Robert Guttar, who is music direc- 
tor of the Springfield Symphony Or- 



chestra and music director for the 
Bernstein Festival. 

Eugene Fodor, the 28 year old 
violinist who achieved international 
fame when he won the 1974 
Tchaikowsky Violin competition in 
Moscow, will t>e performing Satur- 
day night, July 8, in the Fine Arts 
Center Concert Hall. 

Featured on Fodor's program will be 
Leonard Bernstein's "Serenade" for 
violin, strings and percussion. This 
will be the first time Fodor has per- 
formed Bernstein's "Serenade," ac- 
cording to festival officials. 

"Fodor is a young and exuberant 
performer who fits into the kind of 
festival of young American music 
we're having," said Fine Arts Center 
Director John Jenkins. 

"Fodor was very excited about hav- 
ing a chance to perform the 
"Serenade," said Music Director 
Robert Gutter. 

Also included in Fodor's program 
will be a selection of symphonic 
dances from Bernstein's "West Side 
Story," and American composer 
Charles Ives' Symphony No. 2. 

Jazz artists Maynard Ferguson and 
his big band and the Thad Jones Mel 
Lewis Quartet will perform Sunday, 
July 9, in the Fine Arts Center Con- 
cert Hall 

Ferguson has been playing m and 
leading big bands since he started in 
Stan Kenton's big band in 1950. He 
has recorded a popular big band ar- 
rangement of the song "Maria," 
from "West Side Story." 



says 

WEDNESDAY 

■ 

MICHELOB NIGHT 

Free Manehist 



12 oz. 



Bottles 



DON'T FORGET - HAPPY HOUR DAILY 

5-8 p«m • 

Monday all Nite long 



1 PfSjf St. Anhenl 



AAiiler drauqh* 35' 
Most bar drinks 75' 

S49-54Q3 



Nixtt 



f^ 



4 Collegian, 



I Wednesday, July 5, 1978 



Dorm lease proposal 
to be ready in Sept. 



ByL£EBURN£TT 

Student and administrative negotiators 
will present a residential lease proposal, 
which they have been working on for about 
9 nrH>nths, to the UMass Board of Trustees 
by September 15. 

Representatives from the Student 
Organizing Project, the Residential 
Resource Management Office, the Com- 
munity Development Center, and the Of- 
fice of Student Affairs have been working 
since last October on a document that 
would establish a contractual relationship 
between the student and the University. 

Should the board of trustees adopt the 
proposal every student would receive a 
copy of the lease which would spell out the 
conditions for fee payment, room choo- 
sing, duration of occupancy, danuge policy, 
and a rebate schedule Upon signing the 
l«aM the student and the University would 
be bound to legal obligations. The lease 
proposal also sets up a residential comnrwt- 
tee with students holding majority 
representatton to recommend policy to the 
vice-chancellor for student affairs. 

David Barenberg. Student Organizing 
Profect team member, said a lease "sets 
the precedence for a contract with the 
University, getting them (adn^nistrators) to 
recognize their obligation to students. 
Formerly if the University didn't live up to 
its obiigatins there was no one to overs** 
tt»en>." 

Barenberg also said Nothing in the lea s e 
IS new for student obligations. There 
already is a Student Code of Conduct " 

When asked of the significance of a lease 
Barenberg said, "Dealing with space 
allocations, budgeting, room choosing, 
and repairs ate things that affect students 
every day With the residential committee 
participation is rrwre than symbolic mvolve- 
rnerrt." 

Vicky Fortino. also with the Student 
Organizing Project, said, "In the past 
students never heard about rebates They 
would get them if they complained long 
enough, but a lot of students got the run- 
around Now It (the rebate policy) will be 
written into the lease and all students will 
receive a copy." 



Bryan Harvey, from the Office of Student 
Affairs, said, "We're not talking about 
something of great earth shaking change; it 
makes sense to have damage policy in 
writing; it makes it easier to administer the 
residence halls. We're just telling them 
(students) about rights they already have. It 
doesn't mean you are going to grant any 
more rebates. There just isn't that much 
damage attributable to University 
negligence." 

Barenberg said about the relationship be 
tween the lease and the voluntary status 
juniors now have regarding dorm living, "If 
you are going to voluntary then you have 
more of a stake in making the dorms more 
attractive. Dormitories have to be com- 
petitive, therefore you have to involve 
students in the way they are run." 

Ashoke Ganguli, associate director of 
Residential Resourse Management, said 
both the voluntary status of juniors and the 
dorm lease were responses to the high level 
of vandalism. "We spend thousands each 
year; it cost $45,000 to reptaint Gorman last 
year and there is already graffiti on the 
walls and everything else," he said. Speak- 
ing of the decision to go voluntary, he said, 
"We hope to save money on darr>ages." 
Ganguli said about the lease, 'With a con- 
tract the mechanism is nrtuch stronger for 
processing disciplinary cases." 

One of the points of contention in the 
lease negotiations is whether or not there 
will t>e time restrictions on repairs The Stu- 
dent Organizing Project proposal calls for 
emergency repairs to be done within 24 
hours 

Acting Physical Plant Supervisor cdward 
J. Ryan said, "I wouldn't want to be bound 
to a fixed time limit: you know a roof leak is 
one of the most difficult things to find 'In a 
reasonable length of time' is the word 
around here" 

Occupiers of th^ Whitmore administration 
building last April listed dorm leases among 
their demands Barenberg said the occupa- 
tion "accelerated the process that was get- 
ting bogged down." Harvey said, "The oc- 
cupation was kind of funny, people were 
demanding something we were already do- 
ing " 



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Sunlour "Gold" Freewheels (asst'd sizes) 

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Block gefwrator frofit & rear Hghts 

Tear drop nylon t)ag 

Veto nylon sett bags 

umvega water bottle & cage 

90 lb gum waH 10 spd ttre 

Can^jagnoto front derailleur 

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special $205.00 
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special 10995 
158.00 1290C 



FROM UUR "LOCKER ROOM" 
Gym Shorts $3.96 

Ocean Womens Jet Skin Swimsuits $20.00 
Brook LakJes Vlltonoya Joggino Shoes $19.00 
Mens Ocean Swimsu>s $6.50 
Tiger T Shirts $8.75 
Pony Marathon Jogging Shoes $19.95 
Cotton Sweat Suits pants $7.50. shirts $6.95. hooded $11.95 
Fastrak Marathon Joggers Running Shoes $17.50 
Also available Puma Tennis Shoes f rom $1 2 . 75-$26 . 95 
Fastrak Basketball ^hoes from $19.95-$22.00 . ^^^^ ^^ 



1 E Pleasant. Amherst S49-6904 
open every day. Thors till 9 PM 




-SHIRTS 

GYM 

TRUNKS 

JOGGING 

SUITS 

IMPRINTED 
AND PLAIN 



WE HAVE AN 

IMPRINTING MACHINE 

IN THE STORE AND CAN 

DO MOST ORDERS WHILE 

YOU WATT. ALL AT GREAT 

PRICES. 



SUMMER HOURS: 
MON FRl 8:30.';:30 



ai he UNIVERSITY STORE 

campus center 

port in tht' campu* center parking garage Jor «My occeM 




\ 



II 

% 



Wednesday, July 5, 1978. 



iCQllggMas 



self service deli our best 

^ quality for picnic sandwiches 

Sun Glory 




Extra Mild Franks 
Sliced Cold Cuts 

comer deli you h fmd an 

your favorite deli foods 

Avail m tlorM iMlunng a sarvca d»t 

Domestic 

Cooked Ham 



Sectioned and 
Formed 




1 



99 i^ 



Ik 



Swiss Cheese ST *2.39» 
"White Gem"Roasted 

Tiiikey Breast 

All White Meat *^7fl 

Sliced to order ^^B ,^ 

Baked Ham «,»v«. *3.79.. 
Shrimp Salad «••»• "2.59. 
Rice Pudding SS!?? 69' 
Soft Rye Bread .'SlliS 66^ 
Cole Slaw '-i** 59i 

our kitchen Fme foods to 

save you time, worK rrxxiey 

2 pound package 

Potato Sdad 

or Macaroni ^^^ft^ 

Salad ^F^F 

Cooked Chickens .:•.: : :' 1 09. 

Cheese Pizza '" :.r '1.39 

Cheese Pizza 99^ 

frozen meat Lean txjrgers 

all set for your barbecue 

51b. Box Countryfine 

Beef Patties 

20-4 ounce »^QQ 
patties ^^^^ 




s 



V 



Turkey Roast 



3WM% r^VmK#VI 



•3.49 



sea food Fish lovers— save or, 
delicious seafare at Stop & Shop' 

Fresh Cod 

nuets 'l^^ 

Fresh Clams chwrvsiooe 59i 
Fresh Littleneck Clams '1 .09^ 

frozen foods Tasty foods 

for fast-totix meals 

Stop & Shop 

rench 
fpfs 

^K.16oz M 
^^^pkgs^^ 




Regular or 
Crinkle Cut 



$4 

.1602 

>P*<9s ^ 

Meat Pot Pies c-'i:;r.'r. 4X'^ 
Strawberries <T:^^ 59* 
Whipped Topping IS;?,^ 49* 
Hound Cake n>«a>MH<i»iboti»q o9^ 




Shop-100%Natural 

IceCresun 

Half Gal. Tub ^^49 
Assf d. Ravors ^ ^ 



top & Shop Waffles 
Fudge and Pop 
CerfNiy Citrus Bars 

Sloe* ^ifvty^*rin^-A^ <HXTf garfc^gr 



1' 



smpashop 

?4c' *?ni i*f4 



(»qs I 

•1.09 
M.09 



dairy Take advantage of special savings 

Stop&Shop-1 00%Pure 

^ Orange 

NaZai Juice 

Half Gallon ^%^^ 
Carton ^Hl 9m 



'^■m 



v^-^ 



from Concentrate 



Lemonade iSi;.^^ti^Jl 49' 






Sour Cream 
Yogurt 
Light N Lively 
Swiss Cheese 
Sun Glory Drinks 



16 ounce ci«} 



69* 

3S489* 

69' 

Gtnry^&07 pka I .v7w 

69' 



IS!^^^«Hfe 




Ground 



Fresh or Frozen 
3 pound package 



sokj in 

31b pkgs. 

only 



Boneless Beef 
Chuck Steak 

^White Gemfta^lfll 
Chicken Legs #9f. 

^^ Countryfine « «^ ^ 

Corned Beef 
Brisket 

Italian 
Sausage 

Smoked Pofk 
Shoulder Roir 

Fl^eSn U.S. Grade "A" 4-6 lbs. 

I>ucklings 



Point Cut 
Flat Cut $1.29*, 



Countryfine 
Hot or Sweet 
2V23lb. 
package. 




Stop & Shop 

Cold Cups 

79 



lOOct pkg 
' ounce sue 




Foam Cups 
Plastic Cups 






39^ 
79" 




Early California 



Olives 




Giant Ripe Otives 
Manzanilla Olives 



59' 




Salad 

'Dressing 

160Z. btt 

Wesson Oil 
Baked Beare 



Seven Seas 

Viva 
Itsdian 

69 



99' 
69* 




Stop & Shop 

Potato 
Chips 

59 



100^ NatLMi 

8 ounce 
bag 



$( 

Wafer I 
ddedl 



Beef Liver IMf 

^^ Peeled & Deveined- Frozen ^^^X. 

^^^^^^ Delicious cooKed with bacon. ^^^ ^^^^" 



Pretzels 
Bugles 



7a#r*(*9 



49* 




Assfd Flavors 

Sun Glory Napkins 
Aluminum Foil 



Shasta Diet 

Soft 
Drinks 

612oz^kAf 
cans ^^P^V 



W hite Paper 

79 

Pastel Paper Rates x 'J^'^ 8& 
Paper Rates ^\r,t.r.r,r- 99* 

Stop & Shop 

Whole Wn 
Kosher JL#UA 

Pickles 

32 ounce ^W^K 
lar ^^ 

Heinz Pickles ^HliTT 69* 
Kosher Dill Spears »ri^ 79* 

Heinz-16oz. btl. 

B-B-Q 
Sauce 

T-S9 

Thin Spaghetti ZS^ 2'pU:89* 
Mushrooms ^"ITS: 2^89* 

Stop & Shop 

Sauer- 
kraut 

51602 V . 
cans^^ 

Heinz Relishes ^::rr.S; 39* 
Stop & Shop Mustard "^49* 

Nestea 

eahBx 

|39 





WUKrhr.iiil 







with sugar 
and lemon 






59* 
59* 



Iced Tea Mix 
Tomato Juice 






59' 




onions and peppers. 



\ Stop & Shop 

Marsh- 
allows 

SIOozV 
bags^K 




Stop&Shop-llb. can 

CoSee 

|Regular.$^^^A 

Drip. ^P»^ 
Electric ^HP 
Perk or Automatic Drip 




produce bakerycreanonstrom our bakery healty & beauty alcls 



Seai>esM6ctf Ci« 




italoiipe -^09 




Large Size Southern 

Peaches 



Sweet & 
Juicy 



3"^1 



Premium, Butter- 
milk or Buttertop 

Daisy Donuts 
Pound Cake 
Rhubarb Pie 



^p&shop Shampoo 

3160Z ■ 
loaves ^^L 



,Revlon Milk$^29 
Plus 6 I 



Fresh White 

Mushrooms 

12 ounce ^^k^^f 
package ^W^W 



Kraft Singles 



f t^tn^rtTTwJOjnor Qtarte(wfruttP\s<t} 



M.49 



r»mlual^ W'acoed CnMw Food Sk^t 



Fresh I Fresh 

Cucumbers Kiwi Fruit 



Add zip to 
your menus. 



4^^| I For fruit salad. ^V ^^1 
for ^M I desserts or in ^^^'or^l 
^^^1 green ^^^m ^^^ 




stop* btvo-fiMr^ <r 
S.A^v 1 1 rnt pfcg D* 1.' 
^tnol Shoo-GoCjor 

MiKtte- 1 ioi [*g 

SicQASrtao 
?? ounce phg 



59* 
09' 
89' 



Stop & Shop 

Sandwich 
'Rolls^'"^ 

or Frankfurt Roils f^r?t^8 ^l 



Reg . Oily or Tinted-8oz. btl 

Body Powder99* 

Shower to Shower-8oz cont. 

Free roll Kodak 
film with each roll 
developed. 



Bring your exposed roll of color print film 
to Stop & SfKip this weeK only and receive 
a roll of Kodacokx pnnt film (size 110 or 
126, 12 exposure) free of charge NJo 
coupon required. Offer expires July 8, 
1978 

.ick.i^s of any lie"! Pitppl *«t%ef# ol^«*f^P foii?0 Items nfffe.J tyr s.il* fVit av*iabi* .n ^aie (oK » to otrn*' d^ai^^i. o# *NAtf».rtWi Cooyt^ihl t9.'8 by S'tTO* '.Nc S<«>«^n.,»«i»Prt Alt f^jhW 't-vvKl Not resoon»iWe to* ^pogf«)hcsl »«OfS 



HADLEY-AMHERSTRoute9at the Hadliey-Ainherst Line. Sa.m.-lOp.m., Mon.-Sat. We redeem your Federal Food Stamps. 



weanesaay, JuiyS, 1978, 



R Colle gian. 



S ports 

Intramural Softball ends 
for first summer session 



By GENE GRZYWNA 

Intramural softball has concluded regular 
season play for the First Summer Session; 
Regular Season Standings: 

Amahcan League 

Random Walk 4-0 

Space Cadets 3-1 

English 2-3 

Sharks 2-3 

Bureaucrats (M 



NMlonalLMgiw 




Midnight Ashcans 


M 


RRM 


2-3 


Poned Planters 


2-3 


SBA Sobs 


1-4 



Playoff action will get underway tonight. 
July 5th, with the first place team in each 
league playing the second place team in the 
other league The winners of these semi- 
final games will square off Thursday night 
in the Finals. 

The week of June 26 through June 29 
Softball highlights: 
June 26 

RRM 13-Planters 4, (RRM) Paul Daley and 
Craig Pulliam three hits, Bob Hodgson, 
Tom O'Connor, one of the Berquist 
brothers, Joe Scanlon, arxj Getchell, two 
hits each; (Planters) Paul Willing, Chris 
Brooks, Paul Jennings, Joanne Fillatti, two 
hitsaptece. 

Ashcans 21 -SBA 11, (Ashcans) Ed O'Brien, 
Ken Stickney (two honners), and Wayne 
Carey, three hits each; (SBA) Maury Halli- 
day, three hits, and Mike Hart and Tom 
Madden two each. SBA held an 11-0 lead 
at one tin>e, and the Ashcans came back 
whh a thirteen run inning and ended up 
with twenty -one. 
June 27 

Random 19-Bureaucrats 1, each team was 
short players, but Random had one more 
(eight to seven) and this proved to be the 
difference. (Rar>dom) Bruce Eckmann four 
hits, Paul Gilmore (homer and a double), 
John Malayeff (triple and a honrter), Steve 
Fundakowski, Bruce Morra, and Bob 
Galkiewicz, all had three hits each; 
(Bureaucrats! Roger Fourmer. Gary Winter, 
three hits each, and David Golan, a home 
run 

June 28 

Space Cadets ia Sharks 6. (Space) Bill 
Heigl (homer), and Jeff Spooner, two hits; 
(Sharks) Bnan DeLima, three hits including 
a double and a homer. Space was down by 



one run in their last at bat, and came up 
with six runs. Da Sharks countered in their 
final frame with a single run. 
Ashcans 12 4 and 25-4 over RRM, 
(Ashcans) Brian Stagner, two hits in the 
first game; Wayni Carey, four hits in- 
cluding two triples and a homer, three hits 
by Ed O'Brien, Ken Stickney. and Randy 
Cornelius in the second game; (RRM) Brad 
Brandts (homer), and Bill Coleman two hits 
each in the first game; Cliff Pedrow, Paul 
Daley, and Craig Pulliam with two hits in 
the second game. 
Planters ar>d SBA split two gannes. Planters 

11 SBA 9, and SBA 11 Planters 8 SBA got 
their first win of the season in their last 
regular season game. (SBA) Tom Oliver 
and Bob Ko/iol had three hits in the first 
game, Dennis Murray and Ko/iol had three 
hits in the secorxJ game. (Planters) Bruce 
Edwards had three safties in the first game, 
and Paul Willing had three in the nightcap 
kMS. 

June 29 

Space Cadets 11-English 8, (Space) Two 
hits by John Moynihan and Jeff Spoor>er. 
Random 9-Sharks 2, (Random) Homeruns 
by Pitcher Olaf Brynjolfsson and Steve 
Fundakowski; (Sharks) Two hits by Avenia 
and Alfred Drewes. 

English 15- Sharks 6, (Sharks) Jay Clark 
with a home run. and Brian DeLinru (bases 
cleanng triple) both with two hits. The 
game ended dramatically when DeLima 
tried to stretch his triple into a grand slam 
home run, came in standing up (without 
sliding) and was tagged out 

Tennis action is winding down into its fir^l 
week of league competition Ashe League 
Results: Bob Garr^che over Bruce Morra 

12 10; Dick Lindgren over Morra (6-0, 6^1) 
and Gamache (6-1. 6-0); Vin Watson ove* 
Steve Dahl (6 1. 6-4), and Philip Mc- 
Sweeney (6-0, 6- 1 ); and Dahl over Gamache 
(7 5. 6-4) in a rescheduled match. Borg 
League Results: Fred Alit>ozek over Tony 
Ghgonis (6-2, 6-4); Alan Patrick over 
Alitiozek (10-5) Casals League Results: 
Mary Jane Ouinn ever Kathy Thomas 
(10-7), and Ann Koski over Elizabeth Mat- 
thews (10-1). 

The IM Deparinr>ent wishes to thank Paul 
Murphy and Jim McMath for their outstan- 
ding )obs as summer umpires. Any softball 
teams or tennis players from the first ses- 
sion wishing to continue playing in the se- 
cond session should re-submit roster and 
entries as soon as possible to the Intramural 
office 



If 







COLLEGE DRUG STORE 

4 MAIN ST AMNERST 



Wednesday . July 5, 1978 



MOUNTAIN FARMS. FOaR 



(\ftA QIR*) MOUNTAIN FARMS MALL 
90H-9I30 ROUTE 9-HAOlCY, MASS 



Beat the nigh price of 
PRECISION HAIRCUTS 



For His 
&Her 

Includes: 




^ 



FIRST - a professional consultation 

SECOND - a precision style cut 
selected individually just for you. 

THIRD - our stylists will show 
you how to take care of your hair. 

^"/^^ $8.00 

PERSONAL STYLE CUT 
SHAMPOO & BLOW DRY 

long hair tiightly more 

on Tu«. & Wed only 

with this coupon only 

limited to new customers only 

Styles by Deborah 

Call for apot. 549-5S10 



S u its 

Regular 

$60 - $150 

NOW $25 



Manufacturers' returns 
in excellent condition 




Faces of Earth 

Downtown Amherst 
Op.M, 10 00 6 00. Mon Sat 



ADULT ENTERTAINMENT 

Majestic Cin«ma 

84 Cottage Street (Rte 141) 

Easthampton Massachusetts 01027 

Tel 5272346 

July 8 1 1 

t- . ,♦ . ' 7:3 

8:80 
Air conditioned 
under 81 not admitted 




Arts/MusIc 



■Colle gian 



et ceiero 
copy copp. 

TYPING* 
COPYING 

Call 549 0566 

233 N Pleasant St 

Amherst Carriage Shops 



Daily Salad 
Specials 

Sandwiches 

Fresh Yogurt 

Smoothies 

Bagels and Spreads 
Baked Goods 

Homemade 

and Always Fresh 
at Faces next to the Amherst Post 
Office 
Vhoura: 8 00 5 00 



VIM? HOCit f I Stones still going strong 

I f I I f I p fl ^^ 1 ^^ ^P I Some Girls stronger songs. 

I ^^'^^ _ ^^^^. ^^^^ ^1^^ ^^B^^ ^ ^1 ThA Rnllinn Q*nru>. Ron WnnH c tr\i-\t\r\n m.itar <^r> "lioe" 



MtDNTTE SHOWS 
FRIDAY and SATURDAY 



ChequeK5 5aLoon 

Amherst, Massachusetts 



nrtlHERST's 
#1 HAPPY HOUR 

MON - FRI 4pm - 7pm 
WED 4pm - Closing 

Come for a driuk • | 

Stay for diH tier 

"IT'S WHERE 

THE ACTION IS" 

rner 



herd 



great jazz 
woody herman 

and , 

the young "* ' • i o 

thundering ^^ JUly Z, 

' 1978 

. '^' ' and the 

/ "V^^ *" ^^Dudcly 
<^^.T<^^vdefranco 
"*^ ^. quartet 




y 





-_l|hnaynard 
V^-i'Tl# ferguson 

'■-^Jj^S^ and his orchestic 

July 9," ' 

1978^ 

and the 

ttiad 

jones- 

mel lewis quartet 

all events will begin at 8 pnn 

Tickets S7, $6. S5 

umass students 55, S4. S3 

ott^er studerits. senior citizens S6,S5,$4 

tickets available at the tine arts center 

box office and all ticketron locations 

leonard bemstein festival 

of cmercan nnusic june 29-Mv 23 1978 

fhecrts center 

Linvgrsity of rrassoctxisetts 

at cmherst 

cicr 1^. festival direclor V,^ 

rotDert gutu^ muse directa 





[July 15 and 16, 1978 

txiii1brdy;Ar. ^ 




michael uthoff. 

artistic director 

accompanied by the festival 
orchestra under the direction 
of robert gutter 

one of the leading touring dance 
companies in annerica 

iloyd: la nnalinche 
toss: aves nnirabiles 

welling & walach: tonn dula 
Clark: duo 

bernstein: prelude, fugue and riffs 
(world premiere ballet) 
ai: e.enfs willbegmaf 8prr, 
tickets S7. S6. S5 
umass students S5 S4 33 
other students. senior citizens S6, S5 S4 
tickets avoiiobie at ti^e fine arts center 
box office and all ticketron locations 

leorod bemsteir^ festival 

of omenccr nxec yra 29 jjy 22, ]978 

fheortscenter 

LTivcrsjty of mossochusetts 

at omherst f , 

ckjn lic/Tt festMi cirector ^ 

robert guttet muse dieclor 



Jjuly 8, 1978 

eugenefodoc 
violinist- 




'd>^ 




with the festival orchestra under 
the direction of robert gutter 

bernstein: symphonic dances 
from "west side story" 

bernstein: serenade for violin. 

strings and percussion 

Ives: symphony no. 2 

all events will begin at 8 pm 

tickets S7 S6. S5 

umass students S5. $4. S3 

other students, senior citizens 56. 55. 54 

tickets available at the fir>e arts center 

box office and alt ticketron locations 

Jeonard bernstein festival 

of cmericcn rrxistc jine 29-Mv 221 1978 

fhe crts center 

Ln\^2Tsitv of nnassachusctts 

at cmhers* 

cicn Igft fizstivci ofcector 

robert guftet nnusic drcclor 




Some Girls 
The Rolling Stones 

Reviewed by JOHN DA VIS 

Those who have been preaicting death at 
an early middle age for the Rolling Stones 
will be disappointed by their recent release 
Sonne Girls. The Stones have obviously 
been taking in New Wave and Disco Music, 
and the effect has been to strengthen the 
blues rock that has been the traditional 
base of their music, and to allow them to 
expand their playing by adapting the cur- 
rent trends into the band's sound. In 
Some Giris the Stones have recorded their 
best music since Sticky Fingers and Exile 
on Main Street. 

The album opens with "Miss You," an In- 
fectious disco tune on which Bill WynrMn's 
bass playing shows he's been doing soma 
hard listening to the Bee Gees. Pianist Ian 
McLagan, who formerly teamed with Ron 
Wood in the Sn^ll Faces, resonantly fills 
out the Stones' sound. "When the Whip 
Comes Down" is a driving blues rock tune a 
la Exile which Jagger described as 
"straight gay" in his recent Rolling Stone 
Inten/iew. Unfortunately the lyrics are par- 
tially obscured by the sound mixt 

The Stones' vocal limitations are evident 
in their version of the Temptations' stan- 
dard "Just My Imagination," but the 
richness of Richards', Woods' and Jagger's 
guitars gives their version a satisfyingly ripe 
and uniquely Stones quality. Jagger sings 
of Some GMs in the racial, ethnic, 
economic, and explicitly sexual terms that 
have made the song controversial for the 
line "black girts just like to fuck all night." A 
source in Palo Alto reports that radio sta- 
tion KOME has had a running call-in debate 
on the propriety of the lyrics. Most likely 
the Stones were looking for just this kind of 
publicity. Jagger's Dylanesque phrasing 
and the band's blues rock combine to 
forcefully deliver one of the album's 



stronger songs. 

Ron Wood s rocking guitar on "Lies" 
takes one back to "Every Picture Tells A 
Story, " and Charlie Watts' upbeat 4-4 
drives the Stones through a tune which 
recalls "Between the Buttons" and shows 
that Charlie's been listening to the New 
Wave. Richard's and Jagger's continuing 
affair with country blues and American Pop 
Culture are the basis of "Far Away Eyes," a 
tongue in-cheek love song about that girl 
who might be driving a flatbed Ford or 
standing with Gram Parsons on the cover 
of The Guilded Palace of Sin. An 
Altmanesque commentary on Southern 
California adds depth to the lyrics, while 
Mick's stylized 

blues singing and Woodsie's steel pedal 
guitar make for humorous and ronriantic 
listening. 

"Respectable" is a rock song in the 
English tradition that recalls the aural quali- 
ty that characterized Exile. Keith sings the 
lead in "Before They Make Me Run," 
another upbeat rocker that retains the Exto 
quality while coming straight at you much 
like "Bitch" or "Brown Sugar " 

"Beast of Burden" is Some Girl's 
strongest song. Jagger is at his finest, fus- 
ing his pained vocal with Wood's sensual 
guitar in a complex interplay that effectively 
appeals to the lister>er's emotions. The 
Stones wind up with "Shattered," a punk 
rocker about the painful joy of urt>an 
decadence in the Big Apple. 

The exceptionally well produced cover irt 
of Some Girts lampoons America's sexual 
conventions by satirizing the Fredrick's of 
Hollywood look and the iconization of Bur- 
bank's goddesses Although the album suf- 
fers from being a bit static in that it finds 
the Stones working within the confines of 
current rock forms, and breaking no new 
ground, Some Girls offers the listener 
some of the most engaging tunes in con- 
temporary rock music. 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Auto for Sete 



1906 Ooilga Van good engn Er trans body 
fair 549 3661 BO 



Bicyde. Men s tOspd 23" FREJUS "Tour 
de France " w Universal brakes. Huret 
derailleur, Q R wheels, pump Hardly 
used, excellent cond S150 Call Charles 
545 2619<MF 8 30 4 30). 253 9414(eve> 



ApntorRent 






> Fum. Apts. 1 V^-. 2- and 2 V^-rmt. For sum- 
mer occupancy Pool, pkj . Air cond. 
Near Shopping. Amherst Motel and 
Apts Rt 9oDD Zayres 256 8122. 



mrfi&nf 



Rent a irirw refrigerator for summer. 

Poolside.Pat.o. Summer home S10 a 
month plus tax. Spirit Haus Refrigerator 
Rentals. 338 College St Open 10 am 11 
pm Daily 256 8433 or 253 5384 

Apt. Available rtan^ Sublet June Aug, Fall 
option 2 Bedroom semifurmshed for 
$150 on bus route, pool, laundry, near 
stores, etc. For more info call Belle 549- 
5317 

Rm for rant for summar in house on Fearing 
St 5 mm from campus S70'mo. neg. 
July ' August 549 0796 



Rm avail for second summer sess. fully 
furn. In Puff VIge. Rent vry neg 549 2865 



ForSeh 

Large quantities of ice available. Ice or 

blocks Spirit Haus Liquors 338 College 
St. Open 10 am - 1 1 pm. daily 256-8433 or 
253 5384 



One/TvDO dey hetp iiia— iji homemade 
solar HW heater, Sunderland, MF, no 
phone pis write Collegian, 113 C C UM 

Amherst 01003 ' 

Addr oM T S wanted immadlBleM Work at 
home no experience necessary ex 
cellent pay Write American Service. 
8%0 Park Lane, Suite 127, Dallas. Tx 
75a 1_ 

$200 WEEKLY POSSIBLE MAILING 
CIRCULARSI! Materials supplied Earn 
Im mediately' Send self addressed 
stamped envelope Homeworker, B427 
5CA, T roy,MT 59935 

Jobs for qualified applicanti Low pay, long 
hours Hard work and frustration" 
Where^ Developing nations. Math, 
Sciences, Engineering, Health etc 
Apply Peace Corps Off. Sch of Ed; Rm 
213. Call 545 027^ or 546 1042 Eve. 

Audto 



Pioneer FM car tterao cassette deck 2 

Jensen co axial ft 2 Realistic speakers 
Sold car no reasonable offer refused Call 
Brad 253 7462 




Stick in in your eer • we'll pierce them free if 
you buy the studs Silverscape Designs. 
264 N Pleasant St Amherst 253 3324 



There IS a difference!!! 



PREPARE FOR: 



W9A9* « 




Our 0roacJ range of programs provider an umbrella of testing know-hO¥¥ that en- 
ables us to otter the best preparation available no matter which course is taken — 
Small classes taught by sk'iied instructors • Voluminous home-study materials con- 
staniiy updated by expert researchers • Permanent Center open days evenings A 
weekends and staffeo by dedicated personnel • Complete tape facilities for review 
of class lessons and study of supplementary materials • mter-Branch transfers • 
Opportunities to make up missed lessons • Low hourly cost 



MCAT class begins July 8 

Register Now! ! Call 253-2260 

For more info 



College Boards • LSAT 'OAT* OCAT • VAT • VOE • ECFMG • FLEX • 
National Medical & Oentai Boards • 



Nursing Boards 



COME VISIT OUR CENTER 

264 N Pleasant St. 
Amherst, Mass 01002 

(413) 253-2260 




MPUN 

EDUCATIONAL CENTER 



i 

(^^■tEST PREPARATION 
SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938 



Colie g iant 



w Wednesday, July 12. 1978 



SamueI 

BEckETT^S 

TNdqAivfE^i 




The film "Princess Yang Kwei Fei" will be 
playing in Thompson 104 on Tuesday. July 
18. at 7:30 and 9:15. Admission is free. The 
film is part of the UMass Summer Film 
Series. 

BernsteIn 
FestIvaI 



The Leonard Bernstein Festival of 
American Music's production of Bern- 
stein's one act opera Trouble in Tahiti "will 
open Wednesday, July 12, at 8 p.m. in the 
Fine Arts Center's Bezanson Recital Hall. 
Also on the program will be a collection of 
songs by Bernstein. The production will be 
in Bezanson Hall on July 12, 13, 15, 19 20 
21 and 22. 

All tickets to Trouble in Tahiti" are $6, 
with discounts for students and senior 
citizens. 



Conductor and pianist Lukas Foss will ap 
pear with the Festival Orchestra in the Fine 
Ans Center Concert Hall at 3 p.m., Friday, 
July 14. Foss' program includes his "Folk 
Song for Orchestra, " Copland's "8 Salon 
Mexico, " and B«rnsteins Symphony No 
2, "Age of Anx ety." Tickets are $7, $6, 
and S5, with r<iscounts for students and 
senior citizens. 



The Hartford Ballet, directed by Michael 
Uthoff, will appear in the Fine Arts Center 
Concert Hall July 15 and 16, at 8 p.m. The 
performance will include a world premiere 
ballet to Bernstein's "Prelude, Fugue and 
Riffs." The Hartford Ballet will appear with 
the Festival Orchestra, under the direction 
of Robert Gutter Tickets are $7, $6, and 
$5. with discounts for students and senior 
citizens. 

rhEATRE 



Boston's award winning Pocket Mime 
Theatre will appear Wednesday, July 19. at 
8 p.m. in Bowker Auditorium in 
Stockbridge Hall. The Pocket Mime 
Theatre will present a collection of onginal 
works, both comic and dramatic. This will 
be their first Amherst appearance. Tickets 
will be available at the door. 



The Boston Arts Group will perform 
Samuel Beckett s 'Endgame' Wednesday. 
July 12 at 8 p m. in Bowker Auditorium iri 
Stockbridge Hall. 

The play features four characters; Hamm. 
Clov, Nagg. and Nell, who seem to be all 
that IS left of humanity as they wait in a 
room for the end of the world. 



Members of the Boston Arts Group will in- 
struct Exploring Theater and Theater Im- 
provtsaiion Workshops offered through th« 
Summer Arts Hostel during the week of Ju- 
ly 10, while they are artists-in-residence at 
UMass 



The performanc* m sponsoraJ by the 
Untversity '^ - Student Activities Of- 
fice in coopc .; with the Arts Extension 

Service, as part of the Celebrate Summer 
Performance Series. 



Ti( kf'!b will be available at the door Ad 
fTi.ssion is fre»' to Summer Arts Hostel par- 
ticipants, 50 cents for student with summer 
ID.. $1 for children and senior citizens, and 
$2 for all others 



The Commonwealth Stage's "Theater in 
the Works" season will continue this week 
with "Rarnblings, ' a staged workshop pro- 
duction The play is a humourous portrayal 
of a family reunion 

Rarnblings, " a new production, wat 
wntten by Gus Kaikkonen. This will be tha 
second of four 'Theatre in the Works" 
workshop productions. 

The performances will be on July 14 and 
15 at 8 p m in the Rand Theater at the Fine 
Arts Center Reservations can be made by 
calling thu Rand Theater box office at 
545 3511 



The Mount Holyoke College Summer 
Theatre will present the play "Tobacco 
Road," by Jack Kirkland, July 11 through 
July 15. The performances will be in the 
"Festive Tent ' on the Mt Holyoke cam- 
pus, at 8:30 p m Tickets are $3, $4, and $5 
for general public, and $1 off the listed 
price for students and senior citizens. 
Tickets are available at the door, or by cal- 
ling 538 2406 

The Philadelphia Story,' by Philip Barry, 
will open at the Mount Holyoke Summer 
Theatre July 18 and run through July 22. 
Ticket and performance information is the 
same as above. 



MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 



VOLUME V, ISSUE 7 WEDNESDAY, JULY 12, 1978 




SMKlrn. N.v.s,M,.., of II., , ,uv,,-.u ..| n,.,.s.m h.is.iis MnN ,., Mv ,.„«,, 4.1, '*-. l-.iw, 




State workers: no pay^ no work! 



Wednesday, July 12, 1978 , 



tmm^ 



>,*■. At*^ 



■ H. Il l < IH« 



■Colle gian 



State budget passes, workers paid 



ByMARKLECCESE 

BOSTON Governor Michael S. Dukakis 
Monday signed the state budyet, ten days 
into the new fiscal year, finally making 
money available to state workers who were 
not paid on Friday. 
Here at UMass, paychecks for University 



employees were printed up on baturday, 
after the state legislature had passed the 
budget, and were distributed Monday mor- 
ning, according to a University spokesman. 

Gov. Dukakis granted all state workers 
time off on Monday to straighten out finan- 
cial affairs. 

About 6,000 state workers staged a work- 



Stoppage last Wednesday and marched on 
the State House in Boston to protest the 
stalling of the budget in the legislature. 

The group included about 50 workers 
from UMass, according to Jonathan Tuttle, 
president of AFL CIO local 1776, the union 
that represents many groups of workers 
here. 




Sttts PoUoB otHotn. M assn ihrouQh 
the antranoe to tha buicing during last 



fvnoa in front of ttw Stata House in Boaton, 

• raMy of stata \Morkars. (photo by Laura Kanney) 



The workers from UMass travelled to the 
State House in hopes of talking to State 
Rep. James G Collins or State Sen John 
W. Olver. Leaders of the protest had asked 
all the protesters to go into the State House 
and urge their legislators to pass the 
budget . 

"We talked to Olver's office, but they're 
all out to lunch They hide a lot," Tuttle 
said, standing in the corridors of the State 
House crowded with protesters. 

After marching around the State House, 
the protesters went inside, and their chants 
of "No work, No pay!" rang out in the 
high ceilinged, marble corridors of the 
building. 

The protesters gathered chanting in the 
center of the building near the chambers of 
the House of Representatives, who were 
working on the budget. 

B y 6 p , m . , the group was mostly dispersed, 
after many of them had spoken with 
their legislators 

"Since most of you live from hand to 
mouth, you can ill afford to take a sab- 
batical from getting paid on time,"' said one 
union leader at the rally 

Here at UMass, the Five College 
Employees Credit Union set up a system 
under which short term loans were 
available to employees who were not paid on 
Friday. 

' We have set up a system where we will 
be able to issue loans in lieu of th« 
paychecks. Our credit committee has 
already approved blanket loans, " said 
Credit Union Assistant Manager Virginia 
LaCombe last Friday. 

Anne Smith, president of the Student 
Credit Union, said last Friday. "It's really no 
problem for us. It"s a matter of people com- 
ing in and taking money out In fact, itsan 
easier Friday for us than most Fridays 
Eveyone else is up the creek . "' 

This year's state budget totals $4.98 
billion, which is $700 million higher than 
last years budget The fiscal 1979 budget 
includes almost $300 m new state aid to 
cities and towns. 

This year"s state budget includes a lower- 
ing of the state meals tax from 6 percent to 
5 percent, which brings it to the level of tfie 
standard state 5 percent sales tax. 



ERA rally draws 100,000; 

17 attend from Amherst area 



By LAURA KENNEY 

A van carrying 17 people from the 
Amherst area was among the hun 
dreds of vehicles travelling last 
weekend to Washington, D.C , 
which was the site of possibly the 
largest women's riqhts demonstra- 
tion in history 

The rally on Sunday, organized by 
the National Organization for 
Women, drew a crowd of about 
100,000, a figure 70,000 above what 
was expected 

The crowd was rallying for the ex 
tension and ratification of the Equal 
Rights Amendment, which will be 




T' M i-lKit 




extinguished if Congress does not 
enact legislation to support a seven- 
year extension to win approval in the 
38 states required to adopt an 
amendment to the Constitution. So 
far only 35 states have voted ap- 
proval, and the deadline for ratifica- 
tion is March 22 

Vicky Fortino, a UMass student 
who drove to Washington in a rented 
van, said of the rally, "Everything 
was slick, well-organized." She said 
the majority of the marchers wore 
white , 

like the suffragettes who marched 
in the early 1900"s, and carried 
banners which were replicas of those 
carried by the suffragettes. 

"This is |ust the start,"' Fortino said. 
"We'll keep work ing if we don't get 
the extension." About 5,000 sup- 
porters of the amendment stayed on 
Monday to lobby Congress and to 
meet with legislators to discuss the 
extension of the deadline for the 
amendment's approval. 

The House Judiciary Committee 
plans to vote on the extension within 
the next two weeks, which will lead 
to House action by the end of the 
month. The Senate vote will follow 
House action. 

Sixteen women and one man were 
in the Amherst van travelling to 
Washington, according to Fortino, 
and about half of that number were 
from UMass. "What was exciting 
was that there were all different kinds 
of women there (at the rally), and 
many men." 

"We marched from the Washington 
Monument to the Capitol, and the 
line was so long it made a circle. Peo- 
ple were passing out from the heat," 
Fortino said. The temperatures were 
in the 90's throughout the weekend. 

Speakers a« the rally included 
Presidential Assistant Midge Costan- 
za, who read statements from Presi- 
dent and Mrs. Carter, who both sup 
ported the rally and said they favored 
extension Feminists Betty Friedan 
and Gloria Steinem also spoke, and 
former congresswoman Bella Abzug, 
actresses Jean Stapleton and Mario 
Thomas, and author Dick Gregory 
were participants in the march. 




A protestor carries a sign 
(photo by Laura Kenney) 



past the gold State House dome. 



2 Conegian, 



I Wednesday, JuIy 12, 1978 



W^net .1?y_. J «i^^_V£J?7n ., 



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^goltegiaa 3 



Upward Bound 'boosts' kids 



'Back in Springfield I had a totally 
different attitude toward school; 
I didn 'f care. Upward Bound has given 
me better study habits. ' 

'Ricky Lazarus, student 



By LEE BURNETT 

Kevin Blake, age 14, from Spr 
ingfield, wants to go to college Like 
60 others his age from Western Mass 
he ts at Umass this summer preparing 
himself 

Kevin is part of an Upward Bound 
program, one of 400 twelve year-old 
federally funded programs designed 
to address the needs of low income 
high school students who have the 
potential to go to college but or 
dinarily could not go because tf>ey 
lack motivation or come from poor 
school systems 

Says Kevin, "I need a boost. Up- 
ward Bound IS a good one. It gives 
you good habits you need later on." 

Ricky Lazarus. 17, also from Spr- 
ingfield, wants to go into radio com- 
munications and acting. "Back in 
Springfield t had a totally different at- 
titude toward school, I didn't care. 
Upward Bound has given me better 



study habits. The teachers here, you 
can express your feelings to them. 
They're not much older so you can 
come down to a talking level, and the 
counselors come to my room and rap 
how to get on better in life." 

Tyrone Collins, 16, from Holyoke, 
says, "they're learning me more than 
I already know. I'd recommend a lot 
of p>eople to this place. ' ' 

Rhonda Gordon, director of the pro- 
gram says, "most (of the students) 
have D's & P's before they come 
here. They know it's on a trial basis 
so they make sure it is what they 
want. Few come and don't want to 
be here. " 

Gordon said Upward Bound is a 
"significant effort of the Black com- 
munity. We re dealing with youth 
and that's our future ' 

Bonnie Kates, a teacher for the pro- 
gram, said, "I can compare these 
kids with regular University rhetoric 




Upv^ard Bournl Director Rhonda Gordon (right) tato 
Assistant OtractOf Les Anderson, (photo by Edward Cohan) 




Upward Bound students participating in a haaKh care 
semiriar held in thte Campus Center last Sunday (photo by Ed- 
werd Cohen) 



students. My classes are much livlier 
and op>en. They are tougher to teach 
but more fun, not sheep like regular 
students." 

One measure of success of the pro- 
gram is the number of students that 
go on to college. Of last year's 26 
graduates, 23 were accepted at a col 
lege. "The armed services got the 
rest," Gordon said. 

The typical day for those in Upward 
Bound begins with classes from 9 to 
3 Sports and other activities such as 
sewing and photography are from 
3:30 to 5:00. From 7 to 9 are tutorials 
or study hall. Free time is from 9 to 
11. Kevin Blake says, "If they give 
you more time p>eople would abuse 
it. They'd come up here to party and 
that's not what Upward Bound is 
for." 

Tyrone Collins says, "I'd change the 
curfew". 

Last Sunday was Health Awareness 
Day for Upward Bound, a full after- 
noon of speakers and workshops 
held in the Campus Center. Benson 
Cooke, UMass graduate student and 
producer of the program, talked 
about its purpose, "rirst you have to 
know about yourself, to know what 
you can do, then it's up to (you) 
what you will do. Either study and hit 
the books and take care of yourself 
or get hooked up on drugs and 
alcohol. These skills (learned today) 
will benefit them (the students) when 
they take on other responsibilities. 
That is what I would hope will hap- 
pen." 



Gordon also spoke about the recant 
Bakke decision and college admis- 
sions. "I feel we've already felt th« 
effects, even before the decision WM 
nnade. They are going back to the 
SAT's at critical indicators of ap- 
titude even though it is known to be 
culturally biased Admissions will be 
looking at the grades on the 
transcripts with lass of an understan 
ding as to why a student got the 
grade they got. I think tf>e sensitivity 
will be lost." 



Talking about the program's rela- 
tionship to the University, she 
said, "the University has been in 
general supportive. Their connwt- 
ment is to make space available orxj 
the cost of instruction. Their way of 
dealing with qs has changed. They 
used to be warm and accomodating. 
Now they seem powerless to help us 
with problems We're on this cam 
pus, our students provide the same 
fees, but we're considered an outside 
program." 

When asked if she thought the pro- 
gram would ever become obsolete 
Gordon said, "No. I'm an optimistic 
person but realistic about social 
change. The process is slow. Op- 
pression is ingrained in the fabric of 
society. Children my daughter's age. 
for example, I see having to deal 
within the same environment that 
will make Upward Bound necessary 
ten years from now." 




Grad- senate officers 
begin fiscal 79 terms 

New officers of the UMass Graduate Stu- 
dent Senate began their terms last week. 
The new officers, who will serve for fiscal 
1979, are Gordon Pavy, president; Monte 
Pearson, vice-president; David Biggers, 
secretary; and Jose Trejo, treasurer. 

Staff members of the Graduate Student 
Senate will be Dorothy Hayden, ad 
ministrative assistant, and Donald Ross, 
committee coordinator. 

MARKLECCESE 

Madson named 
vice chancellor 

Dennis L. Madson, 40, from Colorado 
State University, last week accepted the 
position of vice chancellor for student af- 
fairs at UMass. 

Chancellor Randolph W Bromery earlier 
this week announced the appointment of 
Madson, who was one of two final can- 
didates suggested m May by a search com- 
mittee consisting of students, faculty and 
staff members. Robert L. Woodbury had 
been acting vice-chancellor for the past 
two years, and will return to teaching at the 
UMass School of Education in September 



Bromery said he hopes Madson will be 
able to begin work before school opens in 
September, and that he will be on campus 
this week to meet with other administrators 
and to find a house for his family. 

Madson for the past six years has been 
director of student services and director of 
housing and residence education at Col- 
orado State University. Bromery said, "I 
got a very good appraisal of his work from 
the president of Colorado State, who is a 
personal friend of mine." 

However, Bromery said, "My decision (for 
the new vice chancellor) must be concurred 
on by the board of trustees." 

LAURA KENNEY 

UM dancers audition 
for Broadway show 

Three members of the University 
Dancers have been asked to audition for 
the Broadway revival of "West Side 
Story," after the producers of the show 
saw them in the Leonard Bernstein Festival 
of American Music's production of the 
play, according to David Letters, publicity 
director for the Fine Arts Center. 

The three dancers are Arthur Tuttle, Paul 
Nunes, and Dawn DaCosta. 

Auditions for the Broadway revival pro- 
duction have already been held in New 
York Ci!V, and according to Letters, "It's 
very rare that producers will see other peo- 
ple (after the auditions) and invite them 
down. 



In the Bernstein Festival's production, 
Tuttle danced the part of Diesel, a Jet, 
Nunes danced Pepe, a Shark, and DaCosta 
danced the part of Consuela, one of the 
Shark's girls. 

- MARK LECCESE 

Grad publisher of 
news magazine 

A UMass alumnus was recently named 
publisher of the magazine U.S. News and 
Wor/d Report. 

William G. Dunn, who graduated in 1950 
with an English degree, was promoted to 
the position earlier this month. He had 
previously been a vice-president of the 
company. 

Dunn's involvement in the publications 
field includes having been sports editor for 
the Collegian in 1949, when the paper was 
still a weekly. 

After leaving campus in 1950, Dunn did 
not return until a brief visit in 1970. "I was 
absolutely overwhelmed," he said. "As I 
drove in I couldn't find a familiar land- 
mark." 

W. ANDREW SUNDSTROM 

MSP may release 
contract this week 

Details on the new faculty contract, 
agreed upon in collective bargaining be- 
tween the University and the Massachusetts 



Society of Professors, may be available by 
the end of this week, according to an MSP 
spokesman. 

MSP staff member Lynne Seymour last 
week said the contract was not typed up 
yet, and that details of the contract could 
not be released until the University's 1,2(X) 
members have seen the contract. 

Seymour said the contract, which is over 
100 pages long, must be ratified by the 
faculty before it can go into effect. She said 
she expects ratification by late September. 

-MARKLECCESE 



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weeks lor delivery 



Rent control issue to surface again in fall 



By LAURA KENNEY 

Amherst tenants are once again planning 
to propose a tent control article at Town 
Meeting this fall, but people involved in 
ter^nts' grc doubt that such an article 
will pass thic 



"The more we (the tenants' union) in- 
vestigated the costs of the utility bills and 
looked at how much he (Cohn) was lower- 
ing the rent as compared to what the utility 
bills would be, we realized we were getting 
a rent hike." s<»'d Wentworth. "We're 
organizing to prevent him from putting in 
meters." 



Rent control 
number of ye. 
Meeting had < 
Two years agr 
tenants' group 
referendum, 
defeated,' ar 
Asociai.op I." 
spring was thi 
It (rent contro'' 



had been proposed tor a 
<rs in the past, but Town 
■ever passed the proposal 
<1 had been rejected, but the 
::alled a special election for a 

which was "soundiy 
ordtng lu Arr.tierst "^s-ar.* 
. Der Fran Van Tre-.? "This 

rst time we harjn't propoaec' 

n two and a half years " 



group received no response to the letter. 

After several other attempts to com- 
municate with Cohn, Wentworth said 
landlord representative Allen Cohn agreed 
to meet with the group earlier this week. He 
then cancelled the appointment, and rear- 
ranged the meeting for tomorrow night. A 
statement issued by the tenants' union 
yesterday read, "Clearly we (the Colonial 
Village tenants) fall low on his (Cohn's) list 
of prionties " 



A umpcmak '^uist be r«tec*ad by Town 
Meeting before it can be brought to a 
referendum. 



Mary L Wft 
Amherst Te'> 
(yasi<tont of 
Union, s 
rent contr^ .. 
this year. Tht 
con a arvativ, 
tha larxflords 



•worth, a member of ttia 

•nts Association 8r>d also 

Cotoniai Village Tenants' 

s almost a certainty tfwt 

1 pass the Town Meeting 

Tr>wn Meeting nr«n>bersare 

'i'?y almost always stde with 



Currently th« Coionial Village tenants ara 
experiencing J Miculties with their landlord. 
Louis R. Cohr, Early last month, accordtr^ 
to Wentwoin the management informed 
tf»e ter^nts of 'he property that individual 
alaciric mete<. would be imtaited in the 
apartments. ^'^** installation would make 
each tenant ret*ponsib(e for paying his own 
aiactric bill Rental fees r>ow irKluda 
utHities 




The group has picketed the office of 
Kamms Realty, Cohn's agent, three times 
within the past month and wrote a letter to 
Cohn stating that te'^ants wished to meet 
with the landlord in order to di>icuss the in- 
stallation of m*t*»* Wentwc'^h said tf>e 



Housing market tight 
for September tenants 



By CHERYL CrCRNIAK 

The ^ m^'t'et continually tightens and, 
with iha rising costs of living, so do many 
bait*. The hou<ung market in Amherst and 
the surrour.c: areas is also flowing with 
tfta tide arKJ wll t>acoma even tighter this 
faN. 

Thto housing shortage cortsaquantty 
craatea a pr./oiem for the multitude of 
UMaaa studer-rs wfK> desire to live off cam- 
pus. 

Those allow J the option include seniors, 
vf»terans. rn Med students, members of 
fraternities a> I sororities and students liv- 
ing with tf>air i>arents or guardians Also, as 
a result of a '^loposal passed this summer, 
juniors may 8Ko )Oin the ranks of the hous- 
ing hunters. 

Off campus Housing Coordinator Joanne 
R. Levenson w»id it is difficult to estimate 
how many jui ors will be in search of off 
campus faciitt »:s this fall because it is early 
and many stu''iHnts, away from the campus 
for the summer, f>ave not yet contacted the 
office. 



Live Entertainment 

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Dancing 

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Pg^ Wed - Thurs 

M Fat Chance 

^Q Fri - Sat 

MUAST ED UADAS 



Sun 

Andy May 

Mon - Tues 

Magic Fleet 



92 Main St 
The Florence Section of Northampton 
4 Miles West of Smith College, Rte 9 

584-7613 



Levenson said tf>e extent of the housing 
shortage will not be known until August 
when the majority of the listings for 
available houses, rooms and apartments for 
tt>e fall semeter will come in 

"Amherst has not done any ma|Or building 
since 197?.' she said, therefore creating a 
housing shortage in the area, which is "a 
problem Amherst is aware of ' Amherst's 
answer is to "rely on housing in the sur- 
rounding ar*>as." Levpnson said, 'but 
there's just not that much available " 
Tf>e increase in demand for housing 
coupled with the very limited supply will 
definitely result in a substantial jump in 
rent, said Levenson. She estimated that 
rents have rocketed about 25 percent since 
last year . 

Rents for rooms, Levenson said, range 
from about $80 to about $130 a month, one 
bedroom apartments from $ 180 to $250 and 
two t)edroom apartments from $230 to 
$350 (plus utilities) 

UMass students, most of whom wish to 
spend a monthly sum of between $50 and 
$1(X), Levenson said, arc therefore forced 
to find roommates One bedroom apan 
ments consequently house at least two 
people while two bedroom apartnr>ents 
usually shelter about four. 

Students generally prefer to rent houses 
or apartments in houses and shy away from 
apartments in complexes, which are the 
most prevalent, and single rooms. 

The closer available housing is to the 
UMass campus, the more it costs. This is 
no guarantee, said Lenenson, that it is in 
good shape. 

Because of the housing shortage, 
landlords can charge exorbitant rent for a 
less than adequate apartment and still nab 
a tenant. Poor conditions and maintenance 
by landlords is a recurrent complaint by stu- 
dent tenants, who expect much more than 
they receive because of their high rent, 
Levenson said. 

Other landlord related problems cited by 
tenants include failure to return security 
deposits and even a $10 charge by one 
landlord for the privilege of keeping a pet. 

Levenson said she definitely sees a need 
for rent control. She said she feels many 
"landlords end up being landlords only for 
the proiits." 

The Off Campus Housing Office, located 
in the basement of Munson Hall, currently 
lists all available housing within a 50-mile 
radius and some extending as far as the 
Greenfield and Vermont borders. 

Levenson said transportation for students 
is not a major problem because many 
wishing to live off campus ov\n cars. Bus 
service hs also been improved with buses 
traveling more often and service ranging 
further into South Amherst. 

The office not only serves undergraduates 
but also faculty, staff and graduate 
students, among others. 

In addition, office workers counsel 
students on their rights as tenants, main 
tain a secondhand furniture file, and pro 
vide a coordination service to match room 
mates. 



Neither Cohn nor a spokesperson from 
Kamins Realty could be reached for com 
mont yesterday. 



■ We teel that he's unloading his problenrb 
on us, ' Wentworth said. "He should have 
spent the mo-tey in the first place to build 
the apartments better Among other 
things, they're not weather tight." 



Tfie union will coP'Oue to picket Kamins 
office "to draw attention to our situation 
and to the plight of tenants generally,' read 
the statement "There is widespread 
dissatisfaction in Amherst with rents, con- 
ditions and landlords' calloub and unfair 
treatment of tenants, " the statement con- 
tinued. 



Wentworth said she supports rent control 
because it "insures that landlords keep up 
their housing" She said, "Much of 
Amherst housing is rentals; by keeping 
rents under control, it means Xhax more 
tenants would have more money to spend 
in town, eating out, going to tfie movies, 
buying clothes it would make for a more 
stable community . " 



Amherst Republican and Town Meeting 
me-Mber Chauiller W. Atkins said, "The 
landlord must pay 25 percent of his gross 
revenue to taxes H the tax rate climbs, 
landlords have to pay more You can't win 
with City Hall the landlord has to raise 
rents tn pay his taxes " 



Atkins, who )S tuning for state represen- 
tative and who manacjtfd an apartment 
complex in Quincy several years ago, said 

If a docr*iasp m taxes were to take place 
state- wide, renters would have as much to 
gam as home owners I' would take the 
burden off of landlords, and would make 
rent more afforcable. 



Van Trese cf the Amherst Tenants 
Association said, "The outcome (of the 
rent control proposal i wm depend on the in- 
volvement and wiliiiiyness of people to 
campaign hard." 



"We try to make more students aware; 
miiny don't even reali;e they can vote in 
elections and referenduiis in town," she 
said. 



The Amherst Tenants Association has 
met several tim^ withir. the past month to 
decide next year's action on rent control. 
"We have to get a real sense of what the 
energy level of the people is," Van Trese 
said "The association is now loosely struc- 
tured; we're getting together a structure 
proposal, setting up a non-hierarchical 
steering committee, with decisions to be 
made by the general membership. We're a 
relatively small organization." 



Atl<ins a candidate 

for state representative 



By LAURA KENNEY 

Amherst Republican Chandler W. 
Atkins, 31, last week announced his can- 
didacy for state representative in the Third 
Hampshire District, composed of the towns 
of Amherst, Belchertown, Pelham and 
Granby. 

Democrat James G Collins has 
represented the area for six years, and is 
running for re election 

Atkins, son of Amherst Selectman 
William C. Atkins, said there is a problem 
with his eligibility for the position, as it is re 
quired that a candidate live fn the district he 
wishes to represent for one year prior to the 
election. Atkins moved from Amherst 10 
years ago, he said, to continue his educa- 
tion in the Boston area, and moved back to 
Amherst last February. 

Atkins said it will be up to state officials' 
interpretation of the law as to whether he 
gets on the ballot, and whether Collins con- 
tests his position on the ballot. 

A member of Town Meeting, Atkins 
managed Whimsey's of Boston until his 
return to Amherst. He received an 
associate's degree from the Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture and a bachelor's 
degree in business administraion from Bab- 
son College in Wellesley. 

His three biggest campaign issues, Atkins 
said, are taxes, welfare and corruption He 
said of incumbent Collins, "His programs 
are too liberal, especially now when we 
have to increase productivity, decrea.^e 
taxes, cut spending, and fight inflation. 

"I'm definitely the underdog (in the elec- 
tion), but I still believe in David and 
Goliath," Atkins said. 



^^^^r^ 









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Chandler W.Atkins 



I 

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SUBSCRIPTIONS 
On can^ius and oH campus 



%7 50 Summer 



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1(11. Ml (<>' IM.1.1 

f «B79,ir'1.is 



MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 


(L 


J^y&f", 




Co 


LAURA M 


KENNEY 


C(. 


I'ditor 

MARK A 


LECCESE 


Hn- 


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LAURi: 


A WOOD 


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phi. ■, M, 111, 11)1'' 

BARBARAS 


LAMKIN 



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Wednebv^dv, july 12, 1978 



( EdlTORJAl/OpiNION ) COLLEGE 



■BSTiidfNTs UNircd For public cducATioN 

Trustees respond 
to student demands 



On May 3, 1978 members of Students 
United for Public Education attended the 
UMass Board of Trustees meeting calling 
on the board to support our program of: 

No budget cuts 

No tuition increases 

No public monies to pnvate schools 

No to the Parks' Plar\for Reorganization 

In the face of fiscal constraints, the gover- 
ru)r and the legislature are lessening their 
support for the public educational system 
yet they are \A«illing to continue to channel 
millions of dollars to private schools while 
at the same time allowing them tax exempt 
status In other words, state officials are 
willing to prioritize public funds to maintain 
the quality of private colleges and univer- 
sities while quality in the public sector is 
allowed to deteriorate 

In ou' political <>ystem the board of 
trustees is the only fomrMi lobbyist for tt>e 
interests of public higher education. As 
Such, and with the current economic crisis, 
it is imperative that they demand the use of 
public funds to have priority at public m 
stitutions where those funds rr«y fuly ser- 
vice the public and corr»e under public 
scrutiny SUPE feels that as public officials 
representing the University, the board 
members have a responsibility to fight for 
tt>e interests of public education However. 



A deeper insight migh be provided by 
looking at the educational background of 
the trustees Nineteen of 26 board 
members attended such elite private 
schools as Harvard. Yale, Columbia and 
Barnard. This educational make-up in- 
fluences the types of decisions and the 
general outlook of the board In response 
to SUPE's demand for no public rrtoney to 
private schools, the board stated a need for 
a more "realistic" view, seeking an "expan- 
sion of state student scholarships rather 
than direct institutional assistance." Not 
only does this policy decision contradict the 
board's role as an advocate for public 
education, it also continues and condones 
public monies for private schools while 
public education is experiencing budget 
cuts, tuition increases and increased stu 
dent fees. On a board filled with graduate 
of private schools, it is no surprise to find 
resistance to measures which would 
abolish state financial support for private 
colleges and universities. 



Yet eOucational background is only one 
♦actri affecting the board's actions and at- 
titudes the very structure of the board 
within lines of power and accountability 
must also be considered 



as indicated by their answers to SUPE's 
demands, we can only conclude that the 
board of trustees is reneging on its respon- 
sibilitY 

In refusir>g to support the four issues, the 
board cited its "histoncal position: The 
board does not take broad policy positions 

outside Its scope of authority 

However, on the occasions when it does 
express its views on such matters, "the 
board will only do so at the request of an 
agency which does have the authority " As 
there is no law stating that the board can- 
not take such positions, the t>oard's posi- 
tion IS simply a matter of preference - in this 
case, not to come out in support of public 
higher education. 

As for the issue of no tuition increases 
which is "within the jurisdiction of the 
board," the trustees showed their position 
at the May meeting by voting to increase 
graduate tuition and undergraduate fees. 
And in their letter of response to this de- 
nriand. they argued that increased federal 
financial assistance would offset the tuition 
increases of 1976 - yet there has been a 
$200 across-the-board cut in financial aid 
for the fall 1978 term. However, the board 
wants to assure of its "long-standing com- 
mitment to the principle that no qualified 
individual ought to be deprived of the right 
to university level education because of ts 
price .." 

For the issue of budget cuts, we are 
"assured" that the board is opposed. 
However, we are told that when the board 
requests funds, its "reque- competes for 
limited state resources w in requests from 
hundreds of other institutions..." But 
SUPE is not asking the board to take 
money from othe' public institutions or 
state-run services; we are asking that they 
demand to the stt'e to make public institu- 
tions the recipie. . of funds earmarked for 
education - namely those funds going to 
maintain the quality of private schools. 

And s( t goes for each of the issues the 
t>oard says no' but continues to assure us 
that it supports quality pijblic higher educa- 
tion. Yet why arer't they willing to fight for 
it? 




9 oz. 



ColgqtjeiK 



Reg $1.99/Sale 



'Who is the Board of Trustees 



accountable to?' 



We ask the question, "Who is the board 
of trustees accountable to?," because the 
trustees' record clearly shows that they are 
not formally accountable to the students. 
The fact that the board members are ap 
pointed by the governor reveals in what 
direction the lines of accountability run, the 
types of positions the board adopts, and 
the hundreds of activities the board 
engages in. The very structure of the 
board s relationship to the governor and 
the Legislature precludes the degree of 
autonomy necessary to really be an ad- 
vocate of public education 



It is then no wonder that the board does 
not engage in activities that would rally 
support of the academic community to 
fight for the establishment and preservation 
of quality education. Instead of 
disseminating information to the UMass 
community, really soliciting support for 
budget appropriations and participation of 
interested groups on campus, the board 
responds that its "historical position" is an- 
tithetical for real advocacy. Since its 
allegiance and accountability is to the hand 
that tapped them, the board of trustees 
within the present framework will never be 
able to or take a genuine interest in the 
issues that must be addressed if we are to 
continue to have public higher education 
that is a worthwhile experience. 

This conclusion leads to another impor- 
tant conclusion, namely that students and 
faculty at this university must educate 
themselves as to the functioning of the 
system, and to continue to organize in large 
numbers in order to combat the recent at- 
tacks on funding public higher education 
and the disastrous direction of the 
reorganization schemes that are being 
discussed in the state. 



Students United for Public Education is a 
group of students in the state dedicated to 
thie continuing struggle for ttie goal of inex- 
pensive quality education for anyone wfio 
desires ttie opportunity 

-BILLY OLSON 

KAREN FITZPATRICK 

• BECKY WILSON anc 

BONNIE KAPLAN 




CURITY 





DRUG STORE 



4 Main St. 



Amherst 



m f life 

103 N. Pieasant St. Ainhorst 



r< 



•^1 



DON'T MISS 

THE BEST 

SUMMER FOOD BARGAINS 

ANYWHERE! 

- MONDAY NIGHTS - 

ALL the spaghetti you can eat 
for S2.29. Salad and garlic 
bread inc'i<ded. 

- TUESDAY NIGHTS - 

ALL the pizza you can eat 
for $2.00. 

AND INTRODUCING 

THE WORST BURGER 
IN TOWN 

So you think you *ve had the best 
burger anywhere? Don V be so sure 
until you've had '"The Worst""! 

• Deliveries all day 

• Daily lunch specials 

• Italian dinner specials 

In the 103 shops, 
103 N. Pleasant St. 
Amherst, Mass. 256-0441 



Wednesday, July 12, 1978, 



.Colle gian -^ 




Jfii^^ri^p Coupon^ e(irdMCT^iIiil"^^^^ c^ifp^"^"" Xilltf^I^^ 



Toothpaste '^ 

89 



^^l Stop & Shop Coupon ' i(i(((4^y( 

Witt! ihi& coiK' 



Aim with 
Flouride 

8 2 ounce tube 



■OS<t jwiy \*^> Lin •■ >'vv pe' 1. i^vlorrii 



ft®j Margine ^Q^f'^^' 



imperial 



Grocery* 






1 pound pkg 
\fnarganne \j qu. ib sticks 

O""' '^y''S~~Z~^ Good Moo Jgl, 10S«I Jol, 1^ l.m.lon. p.. roslO"-.' MP^—S^lSS 



^iSoft-weve ii 

Bathroom ^ ^^(^ • 

Tissue ■KM ^ 
400 sheet ■ ^W g:! 




^T""*"^ — ■'T- 



{lifL fstop & Shop Coupon j jl 

Deodorant 

89 




^i-S 1 ply roll-package of 2 






FREB 



Stop & Shop 

10 ounce bag 



//ITO^^TW 



Good **0r: Jj'f 10 S»l . Ju 



t f^i.t onm per f jMom»* 



Grocery* 



Dial 
Very Dry 



iv.OtiIi^ljidAdddd&°p * Shop coiiTr^y^^^^ 

NesteaMIx m^fUmJfo 



iSMEEfJ 



6 ounce 
Aerosol can 

•0 Moo Jul, 10S*t ju , t* l<m I oA« p*' >-U«IOfn*i 207 



Grocery* 




99 



]mw^|j2i!?wwn! 



Iced Tea 

Package of 1 
1 7 ounce 
envelopes 

Good Man Jiii>lOS«l Jul> 15 Limil on* pw cu«lo<n« 20S'^~^ 



Grocery* 




r ^i^MarshitiaUovrsg! 

.V.m tnr, coioan onj a i/ SO flirt " . -. 



■jt 



UMii ! stop & Shop C9u^ AAJdUlO 



iniiw|ij^!fiwi'm 



Sunshine 
Crackers 

16oz. box 

Good Mon Julif »0 S*l Ju't '* l '""' o'** D** Cu«*o(ri#r 203 ' 



59 







All NHt.'fal or Rpg 

Stop & Shop 

64 ounce 
bottle 



Grocery 




Over 6'*^in coupon values 
and fine meats i^ve you 
your Stop & Shopsw^yB 




/ Another 

value choice 
front Stop & Shop 

ECOMOWY. 

Ketcliiqp29 

Tlie new Economy label M 
Stop & Shop gives you sigrih 
ficacant savings on nutritious, 
wtiolesome foods such as 
peanut txjtter, spaghetti, 
mayonnaise, presen/es and 
canned fruits and vegetables 
Savings on good, serviceable 
household products, paper 
towels, tissues and plastic 
bags Try the new Economy 
. latoel from Stop & Shop It can 
Vhelp you cope with inflation 

Enjoy take- it-easy 

summer meals. 

fresh from our 

kitchen. 

We fix a b»g spread 

-« WjHJ' of tasty-good 

-"jdr foods to t>elp you 

, shed your apron' 



Stop & Shop »^70 

PastroniLA •» 

TurkeyBreast *3.79r 

Cfiicken'Saiad . 1.99 

Macaroni Salad 59' 

Jumbo Rolls ... . ■■ 49' 

Stop & Shop Baked 

Meat Loaf 

Great warmed '^49 

up or in sandwiches. ^B g^ 

Baked Ham 'Si^ 'S./g 
Cole Slaw "^i^ 59' 



Beef Bottom 
Round ^'fl29 




Beef Rump Roast 
Bottom Round Steak 
Beef Eye Round Roast 



Beef Round 

Beef 
forSwissng 



1 .59. 
1.89. 
1.89, 




^Beef Bottom Round Roast ^SIS; '1 .69. 

'^*^ Perdue 

ickenLegs w«... 

Perdue Chicken Wings 79^ 

Perdue Chicken Breast '1 .39. 

Combination Pack S^ '"^3^^^?^ ^1 .09. 

Jlig size savings witii family packs! 

^ White Gem^ ""^^ 

icken Legs m ^^- 

Chicken Breast 1^%^' *1 . 1 9. 

26% Fresh Beef Burgers It '^ .29. 
Deutschmacher Franks 







Cello Casing 
51b tX)K 



'5.99 



SMCtSnoc t 



Stuffed Cabbage b-pou™, 



1.29 



our kitchen Fresh, not frozen 

Fresh Cheese 
Pizza r 99 

Fresh Pizza 
Cole Slaw 
Custards 



Specials on4 delicious kinds of cube steak! 

Vary your summer menus with our fresh, delicious, wasteless cube steaks . 
great for dinner or hearty picnic sandwiches fry em all. 

Cube steak Beef Chuck '1 .79. 

Beef Round Cube Steak '1 .99. 

Pork Cube Steaks = 1 .79. 



^ ^Slop t Shop Coupon «(|ij[lt(i|^^^Ujjjjy,,, Slop « Snop Coupon^ ^^ 
I^Mn (w coupon gi_» ^^ /«•»»« oj.4»n ^ 

Save20^ 1 1 Save20 

Ei3 Kool-Aid 



33oz can Drink Mix g_ 

. Country Time s:' 

^Lemonade or Pink Lennonade§I| 
~^ Powdered-Makes lOgtSpog?:! 

Grocery* \fWf^ 




9 ounce package 

Taste O'Sea 
Clam Patter 



I stop & Shop Fresh &:" J Stop & Shop W\ 
I Chicken Pie 5=13 Muenster Cheese gj 




Slop & Sr>op Coupon 



Save30 




Powdered Soft Drink Mix ^1 

Lerrxjnade 33oz Grape 32oz or ^i 
Trop Punch 36o2 -Makes lOqts ^ 



J1»"TOGrocery* 




« ^1 

32oz jar Stop & Shop ^\ 

All Natural Ei 

Mayonnaise ^,^^g| 

Groce^jQ^FJJ 

Save20 




— ■»» 



Large 24oz pkg 
Meat* 



! 1 Vc 




, I Slop t STiOP Coupon j 
Via cxmK JH 



Saveir _ 

:§ Tootsie Candies £r 

~^. Tootsie Roll MKJgees 8-oz Szl" 

Tootsie Caramel Pops-6 6202 . §^|- 

or Toofsje ?ops6 62o2 pkg g^i" 



l^ Random Weight Packages ^| 

JXi Stop « Shop Coupon (jj^jj^li^Jl 

Save 15' 

Hendrie's 
opi 

-36 c 



Popsicles 

ounce package 



12 count -36 ounce package *-J 
Assorted Flavors pi.}?-! 



I^SSj* '°° * S»op Coupon ; iJIijf5§Ul5!l._S'°'' » Shop Coupon ,^, 



ooupor^ 



Save20 



Am VdoouocT 



Save20 



Half Gallon Carton 5:|-^ "^ couni pacKage ^| 

Stop & Shop Dhnks ^i=% Keebler Vanilla -■ 




Iced Tea iced Coffee §:' 
or Fruit Ravored 21 r^! 



Ice Cream Cups ^1 



w^4 Mo^ Jv'T *0 Sal ^*i 1) t'*^< en* ««f 1 



Groc-y* jWF?Ke|J 



frozen foods Soeclal values 

Heinz Deep Fried 



^ 



«..^ 



^!^.Baiiqnet 
French Fries ^^^^INnners 

• • ^•■^»»» * ••wj^ Chicken, Turkey, ^^ $^ 

^^^Mr Salisbury SteaK ^^P 1 1 oz ^1 
^^^fl Meat Loaf or Veal ^K^ pkgs ^L 



Regular or 24oz 
Crinkle Cut bag. 



Lemonade 



Country T«ii» 

Orange Juice uti^ 
Eggo Waffles 



2'^89' 
69* 
59- 



Chicken, Turkey, 
Salisbury Steak, 
Meat Loat or Veal 
Parmegian 

Fried Chicken 
Veal Parmegian 24 
Salisbury steak ,?Siiy, '1.79 



SKstSnoc 



•2.19 
'1.89 



Hendrie's tee Cream rS2^ '1 .29 Flounder Portions ircfIT M ,39 



Oriental Vegetables 



packagr 



59' Fish Dinner 



9cx>v*ia>') 



59' 



'.i#ee" G«/*t ^/n>M^ye-y i7wie^»* 



tDoubteChvcw 
ta ounce fttf* 

15 ounce piCfcagp 

lOoincepaciUqe 



self service deli count on 

quality at a saving 

Stop & Shop - 1 1b. 

Bacon '119 

Sliced-Reg Maple or Thick ^^m 




Veal Cube Steak 
'2.19, 



"First of Season" 

California 
Thompson 



produce 

irs so good for you! 



70 



dairy shop a super selection of good, fresh foods. 

Firm and Fruity Hood- 1 00% Pure 

Hood Yogurt Orange Juice 



Assorted 
Flavors 

Reddi Wip 
Cottage Cheese 



^^Bcups^K 



99 



io»ij|fi» Wtippeo C'e*^ 

&mte»lcne 

teoopcecup 



79' 
69* 



"• bakery 



Qualitv ingredients in every recipe 



•Seafood catch these specials 

Fresh PoUock Broccoli 

Rllets l^f 59; 



Cooked Shrimp? 

Pricei e"**' ti-'* Moo jufy lOSe' Ju'y il •- f 



1.39 



rsmes 

^mw ^ Red Ripe ^whoieorcut ^^^^ Stop & Shop 

Watermelon lO.. Buttertop 

Matures ™*adX 1 



Half Gallon Ctn. 

from concentrate 

Muenster Slices 

Cheese Slices .";si,^'. 99' 






.:; 99= 



Fresh 

Cucumbers 



51 



bunch 

f-,*- i»>»» f.f|ht (,) i.fTi.1 vtiet '1 1^>'*» Xi^f> 'ye o' a'ty ■'e'^ •■ceo' *»*'# ot^"'fv»ts# 



stop & Shop Bread 2 

2 




Stop & Shop 

leKe 
89 



22 ounce ' 
package 



Frankfurt Rolls 

^ii>4 :>*wp lap ;'•"* 






Marble Bar Cake 'T^r:^. 79 
Stop & Shop Donuts ;^J^' 89= 

K>t^tivnCt<>tKxrd 



e^i :f•er#(Jforlftl*rKl^ava'|«l>'e<nclS*'otso'Ioc•t^^'fer.|HiV.l'*■r^^»l •hi.i»*s,t4't%- r .■|^'p■|' t "»-•*' h» ^-ip K ■ 



■ i(«r"n,irt»ri' Alt fi|hfsM"iP'v#^ f*/ 'esr«ins.t>«e »Of M-^;)' V"^" 




HADLEY-AMHERSTRoute9at the Hadiey-Amherst Une.8a.ni.-10p.ni.,Mon.-Sat. We redeem your Federal Food Stamps. 



6 CoU^^ianj 



Wednesday, July 12. 1978, 



Alcohol survey shows 
abuse exists at UM 



Bv THOMAS MAJOR 

According to a survey of UMass 
students, over half of those polled believe 
that alcohol abuse is a ma|or problem at the 
Univeristy Fifty four percent agreed that 
alcohol overuse exists "to a very great or 
great extent " 

The pdl. conducted by telephone last 
April 26 and 26, was made for a "Project 
Pulse" report of the Student Affairs 
Research b Evaluation Office (SAREO) for 
the Demonstration Alcohol Education Pro 
jectlDAEPI. 

Proiect Pulse is a poll project conducted 
by the Student Affairs Research h Evalua 
tion Office SAREO operating in 
dependently of the administration has pro- 
vided assistance in the past to a wide range 
of adrn nistration offices and Student Af 
fairs agencies 

The Demonstration Alcohol Education 
Project IS a three year program begun in 
1975 designed to promote 'psponsible 
decisionmaking by students on the uses of 
alcohol The DAEP budget for this year w% 
approximately $120,000 The program asked 
for the Project Pulse survey m order to ex- 
pand upon its own annual fall polling of 800 
students. 

The Project Pulse survey concentrated on 
the effectiveness of (>osters, pamphlets, 
and other materials distributed by the 
DAEP as well as the audiences for WMUA- 
FM and its "Dr Salsa's Medicine Show" 
program This is the second year that the 
SAREO has provided the Demonstration 
Alcohol Education Project with a Project 
Pulse survey 

Among other survey results, a narrow ma- 
jonty of those polled (54 percent) knew that 
12 ounces of beer, 4 ounces of wine, and 
one mixed drink all contain the same 
amount of alcohol Half of the polls 
respondents consunr>e between one and 
seven dnnks a week, and 48 percent con- 
sider thenr«elves light drinkers. 



The consideration of th»e poll respondents' 
sex revealed that 67 percent of females (as 
compared to 50 percent of males) consider 
themselves either abstainers or light 
(inkers Males led females 46 to 32 percent 
in considering themselves moderate 
drinkers Only 1 percent of females and 4 
percent of rr^les classified themselves as 
heavy drinkers. 



While just slightly more than half the 
males 

(51 4 percent) said they believed that 
alcohol misuse was to some or little extent 
a problem at the University, two thirds of 
the females said they felt that alcohol abuse 
was to a great extent a problem. 



Almost two-thirds of those polled said 
they did not listen to WMUA FM's health 
and variety program, "Dr. Salsa's Medicine 
Show," and a vast majority (95 percent) 
could not remember hearing a particular 
alcohol education message on WMUA. On- 
ly 22 percent said they most frequently 
listened to WMUA over other area radio 
stations 



Of individual posters and pamphlets, only 
one. a poster captioned "If you drink a lot 
of beer, you drink a lot" was remembered 
by a majority of those polled A pamphlet 
called "How to Help a Problem Drinker" 
was Identified by only 30 percent and a 
"Party Planning" pamphlet could be 
romemt>ered by only 7 percent of those 
polled. 



When asked to imagine a situation in 
which the student being polled was at a 
party where most of the people were dnnk- 
ing, and asked for a non-alcoholic dnnk, 35 
percent believed that asking for the non 
alcoholic dnnk would not change how the 
others at the party felt toward tfwm. Forty- 
two percent did not care what the r>jp(e at 
tfw party felt, and 12 percent beiidved tfiat 
the others would think less o* them. Only 
3 8 percent said they be'ieved that the 
others would think nx>re of them. 



Only 2 3 percent (6 out of the 258 who 
answered this particular question) said they 
had visited Room To Move, the peer 
counseling service organisation that has 
been endangered by budget cuts. 



The DAEP is funded through the National 
Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism 
and the US Department of Health, Educa- 
tion, and Welfare. The project has submit- 
ted to the federal government its applica- 
tion to continue its work for three addi- 
tional years at an average annual budget of 
$125,000. The DAEP at the University is 
one of only four other projects of its type in 
the nation that has been designated as a 
model for the establishment of new pro- 
jects at other universities. 




Carefree — Easy Care! 

189 No. Pleasant St. 

Amherst 

253 9526 



When Was the Last Time You 

and Your Hak 

Looked Satisfied? 

com* on In wm) well talk 
It o««f Our profMslonally 
trained ttaff spaclatliM in 
cuttlnga. cokKlnga. parma 
& body wa«»s 

Walk int Watcom«> 



REGENCY 
THE CELLAR 



241 Main St. 
Northampton 2nd Floor 
586 6190 




"Jl T FNTERTAINMENT' 

Majaatic Cir>er^a 

34 Cottage Str«»rtt ;Rte i4i; 

fcasthcj • pton, Massachusetts 01027 

Tel 527-2346 

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*i«r U>ifi\ng 8 :>o 

Air conditioned 

vi,r>W''i i I notadmitt<4d 



et cetera 
copy copp. 

TYPING & 

COP Y I N 

Call 549 0566 

233 N Pleasant St 

Amherst Cdrriage Shops 



■COllegiylQ 



AMHERST CYCLE SHOP 

Hi Trianglt St. 
549-J7J9 

NORTHAMPTON BICYCLE 

21 Pleasant St. 
St6-3g10 

BIKES, 

PARTS, 

SERVICE, 
EXPERT REPAIRS 
ON ALL MODELS 



Bicycle crarismen 
ol th« world 




MOUNTAIN FARMS FOUR 



584-Q1R1 MOUNTAIN fAMMS MA., 
^O** JIJJ ROUTE 9-HAOCtV. MASS 



IL 



mm 



MK>NrrE SHOWS 
FRIDAY and SATURDAY 



LbequeK5 5abon 

Amherst, Massachusetts 



nmHEftST's 

#1 HAPPY HOUR 

MON - FBI 4pm - 7pm 
WED 4pm - Closing 

Come for a drink 

Stay for d'lHHcr 

"IT'S WHERE 



THE PCTION IS" 




u V^l 



Qualify 
hordcover 



textbooks 
professional books 
general books & 
scholoriy books 

PAPERBACKS, TOO! - STARTING AT 99* 

STARTS WEDNESDAY 

at " the bookstore " 

campus center/univ. of mass, /amherst 

Mnn-rri (V ?(l-f J« 



rt ^ 



^-*- 



Ijuly 15 and 16, 1978 

hartford .,.x 
ballet >'^^ 



michael uthoff. 
artistic director 

accompanied by the festival 
orchestra under the direction 
of robert gutter 

one of the leading touring dance 
companies in america 

lloyd: la malinche 
toss: aves mirabiles 

welling & woloch: torn dula 
Clark: duo 

bernstein: prelude, fugue and riffs 
(world prenniere ballet] 

all e^^ents will begin at 8 pm 

tickets S7 S6. S5 

umass students S5. S4. 53 

other students, senior Citizens S6 '.5 $4 

tickets available at thie fine arts center 

box office and all ticketron locations 

leoTXTdbemstein festival 

of cmefcan muse )une 29-)iJv 23 1978 

fiTK? crts center 

LTHN^Tsitv of massachusefts 

at amherst i' 

aKn li^, festival dreclor 
robert gutter, nnusc directa 




Tf*« 



July 14, 1978 

lukas foss, 

guest conductor and piano soloist 
with the festival orchestra . 
bernstein 

two meditations 

from mass 

foss 

folk song for orchestra • 

Copland: 

el salon mexico 

bernstein: 

symphony no 2 

"age of anxiety 

July 23, 1978; 

fbrence #-? 



quivai; 




mezzo-soprano soloist 

with the festival orchestra under the 

direction of robert gutter 

bernstein symphony no 1 jeremiah" 

tillis; spiritual cycle for 

mezzo-soprano and 
orchestra (world premiere) 

schuller: seven studies on themes 
of paul klee 

bernstein: suite from on the waterfront' 

all events will begin at 8 pm 

tickets S7, S6,S5 

umass students S5, S4 S3 

other students,seniorcitJzens S6,S5,$4 

tickets available at the fine arts center 

box office and ail ticketron locations 

Jeonord bernstein festival 

of cmerican nnustc june 29-)Liy 23 1978^ 

fine crts center 

LTivzrsity of rrxassoctTUsetts 

at amherst ((( 

olon li^, festivol director ^>A 

robert gutter: nnusJc drector 




Bakke decision gets 
mixed campus reaction 

Did Justice Powell ignore 
the intent of the 14th amendment? 



ByMARKLECCESE 



The Supreme Court's decision in favor of 
letting Allan Bakke into the University of 
California medical school, yet at the same 
time supporting affirmative action policies 
in college enrollment, has drawn mixed 
reactions here at UMass. 

"I think its disappointing," said Acting 
Vice chancellor for Student Affairs 
Frederick R. Preston. Prestop, who was 
named acting vice-chancellor last week 
after Robert L. Woodbury resigned, has 
also served as affirrrwtive action officer in 
the Student Affairs office. 

"There should be no problems with our 
administration,' Preston said "We don't 
have a quota system of any sort." 

Because the court rulud against the 
University of California at Davis admission 
policy of setting aside a certain quota of 
spaces in its medical school for minority 
group members, many observers said they 
felt that the court was, in effect, declaring 
any kind of quota system unconstitutional. 

UMass constitutional law professor 
Sheldon Goldman said he was "not all that 
pleased " with the decision. 'On the other 
hand, it could fiave been a real disaster," 
he said. 

Acording to Goldman, the decision stated 
"affirmative action is okay in the sense that 
race can be taken into consideration: 
however, you cannot have a special 
quota." 

Upper levels of the UMas« administration 
have remained silent on the decision. A 
spokesman in the offices of the University 
president in Boston issued a statement last 
week saying that, at present, the University 
attorneys were reviewing the decision, and 

"reviewing the University admissions policy 
in light of the Bakke decision." 

The University president's office is ex- 
pected to make a comment on the decision 
this week. 

"We've always approached it with the 
perspective that we would have an out- 
reach program - never a specific quota or 
goal," said Arthur Clifford, a spokesman 
for the UMass-Amherst campus. 

Clifford said UMass has a program of 
"working with minority students and poor 
students anywhere in the state." 



He called the UMass program "a broad- 
based one to get good students of all races. 
We've had a pretty good program of going 
out into all the social strada and trying to in- 
form as many people as we can, hop>efully 
making it easier for kids who wouldn't nor- 
mally come here." 



Comminee for the Collegiate Education of 
Black Students (CCEBS) Assistant Director 
for Academic Services Carol Maranda said, 
"We certainly hope that it won't affect us, 
but realistically we know that it will. Our ti- 
tle alone may come up for scrutiny." 

"We re waiting to see what kind of stance 
the Univeisity is going to take,' Maranda 
said. "It (the decision) was certainly not 
anything we wanted to hear." 

Professor Goldman called the Bakke deci- 
sion "a very political decision. I think it is 
quite obvious that Justice Powell split ths 
difference." 

The court voted 5-4 against the UCal- 
Davis admissions program, and 5-4 in their 
decision to uphold affirmative action pro- 
grams that were not based on quotas. 
Powell was the deciding vote in both deci 
sions. 

Just 24 years ago the Supreme Court 
outlawed racial discrimination from the 
Constitution," Goldman said, refernng to 
the 1954 court decision in Brown v. the 
Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas, 
outlawing segregated schools. 

Goldman said that before that decision, 
the United States was a "nation that per- 
mitted apartheid. " 

It has only been 24 years since we have 
emerged from the dark ages of racism," he 
said. 

Goldman cited the 14th Amendment as 
the section of the constitution tf>at would 
prevent institutionalized racism. 

"For Powell to ignore the intent of the 
14th Amendment is to ignore the whole 
sordid history of racial dischmination. He 
said that as far as the law was concerned, 
there is no such thing as racism. That's 
not very realistic," Goldman said. 

"What Powell was doing was splitting the 
difference - giving some to both sides," he* 
said. 




i Cgne^iciru 




I Wednesday, July 12, 1S>. 



Wednesday, July 12, 1978, 



gqiy^U, l^nm/ Mil/, 
@illi/ C &©^/ 

if FH/bfc/ ol/o 

at A.J. Hastings 
neivsdealer and stationer 

4S S. Pleasant St. Amherst 









lIQiOHS 

HARP *2.40 4 pk. 

•k Many New German Wines 

Coke ^5.25 case 24-12oz cans 



Mt Ho/yoke group 
displays many talents 



KEGS 

338 College St. 
2S3-S384 



ICE 

ClBKS-BMMiKS 

Rtf. 9 hast 
2%-8433 



SODA 



Parking 



By MARK LECCESE 

At the Mount Holyoke College Sumnier 
Theatre, everybody doe* a linle bit of 
everything 
Orw of the confHMiny of 49 whom you aee 
acting the lead may be the person who 
drove in tome of the stakes to put up the 
"festival tent,' or maybe the person wtx) is 
cookirtg your hot dog at the barbeque 
before The opening of a play 

The summer theatre opened rts eighth 
aaason laat week with a corrwdy by British 
playwright Alan Ayckboum, 'The Norman 
Conquests The company performed the 
third section in Acyckboiirn's sometimes 
funny, sometimes silly trilogy about the 
weekend of a British husbaryj r>anr>ed Nor 
man and his ill-fated appetite for ex- 
tramarital affairs. 

"The Norman Conquests ' was the Mount 
Holyoke College Summer Theatre's 60th 
production in eight years, according to pro- 
ducer Jim Cavanaugh. This summer, ttie 
company will be putting on nine produc- 
tions in ten weeks. 

"We're organized There's no waste of 
time if we can help it," Cavanaugh said last 
week before the season's opening 

The 49 members of the company, who 
range from high school interns to Mount 
Holyoke students to professionals, live in a 
dormitory on the Mount Holyoke campus. 

"People come to the company not for a 
vacation, but to work," Cavanaugh said. 
"It is easier to work in the rarified at 
mosphere of no history papers due, no 
worrying about the weekends." 

None of the actors in the summer com- 
pany appear in more than five plays, and 
directing chores are split up evenly be- 
tween three directors, according to 
Cavanaugh. 

"It's a good company this year, and a live- 
ly company They're working very, very 
hard, " Cavanaugh said. 

This season's schedule features a first for 



the company a play with an all-male cast 
Jason Miller's "That Championship 
Season, " a Pulitzer Prize winning play 
about the reunion of a oasketball team 
many years after rheir championship 
season 

Also included will be Shakespeare's "Two 
Gentlemen of Verona." The Mount 
Holyoke College Sumnner Theatre has end- 
ed its season for the past five years with a 
Shakespeare comedy "They're always the 
first to sell out, and that pleases me very 
much," Cavanaugh said. 

The third section of "The Norman Con- 
quests," titled "Round and Round the 
Garden, ' takes place in an outdoor garden 
a perfect set for an outdoor summer 
theatre A patch of grass in the middle of 
the theatre's "festival tent" served as a 
stage. 

"The Norman Conquests" featured only 
six characters: the insatiable Norman, his 
three "conquests: " his wife Ruth and his 
sisters-in-law Annie and Sarah, Tom, An- 
nie's "dim" veteranarian boyfriend, and 
Reg, Sarah's hen pecked husband. 

The comedy was broad at times, often a 
bit too broad. Some of the actors seemed 
to take Ayckbourn's broadness to heart, 
and much of the acting was a bit overdone. 

In the "festival tent, " the audience is ar 
ranged in a rising circle, and no one seems 
to be more than an arm's length or two 
from the stage; rather than watching a 
staged production, it was more like peering 
over your neighbor's fence and watching 
the goings-on in his backyard. 

This special kind of staging calls for a 
special kind of acting. The slightest voice 
inflection and the slightest facial twitch was 
not lost on the audience, so there was no 
need for grimacing and shouting. 

The actors who played the couple of Tom 
and Annie understood this best. Both 
played their characters with subtlety and in- 
telligence they had a certain rapport on 
stage that the other actors didn't have. 



i^ ^ 1 H n a^T-ii-n-n-«fc!a; 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Auto for Sth 



1966 Dodge Van good engn h trans body 
fair 549 3661 BO 

ForRont 



Rent a mini rafrigwator for Mmwnar. 

Poolside, Patio, Summer horT>e $10 a 
month plus tax Spirit Haus Refrigerator 
Rentals 338 College St Open 10 am 11 
p m Daily 256 843 3 or 25 3 5384 

Apt. Awailabte nan//. Sublet June-Aug. Fall 
option 2 Bedroom semifurnished for 
$150 on bus route, pool, laundry, near 
stores, etc. For more info call Belle 549 
5317 

Two RoomB available between campus and 
town. 256 6215 

ForSmh 



AdOfojaws MomM) inrvTwdiatelyl Work at 
home no experience necessary ex 
cellent pay Write American Service, 
8350 Park Lane, Suite 127, Dallas, Tx 
75231 . 

$200 WEEKLY POSSIBLE MAILING 
CIRCULARS!! Materials supplied Earn 
Im mediately' Send self addressed 
stamped envelope Homework er, B427 
5 CA, Troy,M T 59935^ 

Jobs for quaiifwd applicants Low pay, long 
hours Hard work and frustration" 
Where' Developing nations Math, 
Sciences, Engineering, Health etc 
Apply Peace Corps Off, Sch of Ed Rm 
213 Call 545 0271 or 646 104? Fvp 



Audio 



Large quamities of ice available Ice or 
blocks Spirit Haus Liquors 338 College 
St Open 10 am 11 pm daily 256 8433 or 
253 5384 

Http WBnlBO 

On«/Tv¥0 day h«lp mstaUing homemade 
solar HW heater, Sunderland, M F, no 
phone pis write Colleqian 113 C C UM 
Amherst 0ir/)3 

- tt-B-tm-n-ii ti g a n rtr 



F>ioneer FM car stereo cassene (tock 2 

Jensen co axial b 2 Realistic speakers 
Sold car no reasonable offer refused Call 
Brad 253 7462 



Personals 



Stick in in your ear we II pierce them free if 
you buy the studs Silverscape Designs, 
264 N Pip3s,intSt Amherst 253 3324 



R0UTE9HADLEY.MA. 

2 MILES FROM NORTHAMPTON OR AMHERST 



IDCC CASH & CARRY 

mWwr ^k Wholesale to th« public 

1 1 %k^# ^^ CAN ARRANGE TO HAVE YOUR TIRES MOUNTED. 
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FIRESTONE, B.F. GOODRICH, GOODYEAR 

LEE, ARMSTRONG. ZENITH, and many more first quality 

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SIZE TYPE SALE 



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OUR SERVIC 
PROMISE 

• Wf do profpssiunal wr k • Wi' rrlurn tvurnnul parts 

• Wp do only Ihf work you • \\'v himor our tvarranty 
authorizf n.ilii>ru\i(lf 



Z^om^" 





Brake Overhaul 
-Your Ch oice 

$5488 



Lube And Oil 
Change 

PROTECTS MOVING PARTS - ENSURES 
QUIET OPERATION 

• l.nmplch- liilrhiine'- 
and chasnis liibric .> 
tion • Rnsiirps smooih 
performanr f. r»'(liir»'s 
thr chanci-s -if w«mi 

• Please phiirit' fur 
1 ppoinlnipnl • In- 
"ludc? liRht lm. ks 



au«rts Quaker 
State ^^ ■»*^«»" 



Front-tlnd Alignment 
and 4 11 re Rotation 



$1588 

HELP PROTECT TIRES 

AND VEHICLE PERFORMANCE 



Addit'onji partt «nd 
scr»icti vitrs i( )>:«<>*d 
Front-wftMl driM ticlu4«0 



• Inspt'i I untl lutalf 
all 4 tires • Sri easier. 
c:<4inber. and to«-in to 1 
factory sperifiralinns 

• InspiTl <impi-n«ion «nd siopring syslpm 

• Miisi ' S i.i,- s..;ni jrr.por;-. 




iR\NSIVll.SSION 
SKKMCK 



88 



Additional pai s 
and s«i»ices titra 
i< nttdtd 



All prices plus F.E T. and sales tax 



ROUTE 9 HADLEY, MA. 

2 MILES FROM NORTHAMPTON OR AMHERST 



CASH AND CARRY 

VISA 

OR 

MASTER CHARGE 



0PEN:M0H.,TUE8., 
THURS. A FRI., 9:30 :m. 
I to 5 p.m. - WED. A 8AT., 
.•9:30 a., to 1 p.m. 



586-2544 



Additional P"'? »"tded 
services e»tra i» ^eO*" 



HELPS MAINTAIN STOPPING POWER 

._..„n npw brake pads 



2.Wheel Front Diic: 



Install new brakf 



,uul urease seals 



Reface front rotors • 
Check calipers 



all 



elude rear wheels) , 

..„h..i Drum. 'r''i' "•.L";:.!.'. r"." 



$26 



• Drain and rrplarr 
transmission fluid • 
Install new pan i;.iskei 

• Replace transmis- 
sion filler, when 
equipped • .Adjust 
linkage .ind bands, 
where applicable • 
Most U.S. - some im- 
port cars. 



HELPS PROTECT YOUR 
AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION 




*39 



6c,' 




Air Conditioning 
Service 



I E-Tl 
Ma 



$1988 



plus replacement 
refrigerant @ 
$3.50 per pound. 



E-T Deep Dish 
Mag Wheels 

13 X 5.5 

$4188 $4888 




14x6.75 



^.^:^^^^ 



Additional parts and services extra if needed 

HELPS MAINTAIN MAXIMUM 

COOLING & HOT WEATHER 

DEPENDABILITY 

• Perform complete leak test • 
Evacuate and recharge entire system 

• Adjust drive belt tension • Ti,(?hl- 
en evaporator, condenser and com- 
pressor mounts • Most U.S. - some 
import cars 

Ask Us About Our Nationwide Limited 
Warranty on Auto Service 

Just Sn} 'C hargcir 

y.sr .my III thrse 7 olhiT ways to biiy:i)iir (Iwn 
Custi.mer flredit Plan • Master Ch.irye • nank.Americard 

• .AmeiK.in F.vprrss C.ird • Carle Hlanrhe 

• Mimis Chill • Cash 

Goodyear Kfvolving ( hargr ^a'ount 



E-l Radial 
Spoke Wheels 

^4 $3688 



13 X 5.5 



15x7.5 



$4788 $5288 



15x7.5 



14x6.75 

Hot new style. One piece 
aluminum constructioii 
Hub cover 
Chrome luRS extra. 



included. 



r..bc"ov;r"included. Chrome 

'■^'^ "^E^iert ep,. ^...^ Mounting Service Available. 



Engine liine-lp 
N34H8 %45»« 

4-C)|l 8 f »' 

Includes parts and .after - no eit a 
(.harfe for air .:onditiLn^d cars (lectromc 

i(niiion c^n ii 'es' 

HELPS ENSURE BETTER GAS 
MILEAGE AND PERFORMANCE 

• Kiertronii enRine. 

charging. -inH «lart 

ing system arialysis 

• Install new points, 
rlugs. condenser, 
rotor • Set dwell 
and timing • Ad|ii<st 
carburetor lor econ 
omy • Includes 
Datsun. Toyota. 
VW. and light trucks 

Goodvear 
^Deluxe Ci" Batter} 

«33'5 

Groups 24, 24F 
with exchange 

FREE 

INSTALLATION 

Lar^e capacity """s^'^^H / 
plates for the kind 
of power your car needs. 
Ask for our FREE Battery Power theck 

Sale Knds .Saf. Night 




GOODWVEAR 



182 King Street, Northampton 586-4020 Official State Inspection Station 
New Store Hours 7:30-5:30 Monday-Friday, Thursday 'til 8 p.m. Saturday 'til 5. 



iColle gign q 




Festival 
runs 

gamut 

Classical, jazz 
combine for 

a diverse 

weekend of music 



By MARK LECCESE 

The Bernstein Festival presented some in- 
teresting contrasts in American music last 
weekend, running the gamut from the 
folksy Symphony No. 2 of Charles Ives to 
the ja/z of the Thad Jor>es Mel Lewis 
Quartet to the blasting showmanship of 
Maynard Ferguson and his big band. 

The weekend began with the Festival O- 
chestt Robert Gutter. performir>g two works 
by Bernstein and the Ives symphony. 

Th« orch«stra's performance of "Sym- 
phonic Dances from West Side Story" was 
uneven ar>d a little muddy Eugene Fodor 
joined the orchestra for Bernstein's 
"Serenade" for violin, strings arnJ percus- 
sion, and again the performance waa 
uneven. 

Fodor arKJ the orchestra didn't seam to be 
able to get together, and tha result was that 
the piece came off somawhat flat and un- 
inapirad. 

The orchestra finally came together and 
delivered a aoKd and stirring Ives Sym- 
phony No. 2. This WKKk, written wtwn the 
compoaar was twenty-seven, is heavy with 
refaranoM from other works most 
noticsablv American folk music. 




Gutter conducted this work very well, arKl 
it was a very good choice for a festival of 
American music. 

Sunday night's show matched an odd 
combination of jazz musicians on the same 
bill. The show began with the Thad Jones- 
Mel Lewis Quartet, who delivered one of 
the finest sets of jazz heard here in a while. 
The music was sophisticated and charm- 
ing, and each of the musicians in the 
quartet was delightful. 

Maynard Ferguson and his orchestra was 
quite another story. Ferguson was more 
Las Vegas than jazz, but the packed house, 
who had obviously come to see the 
trumpet player, who has a very large 
following, ate up the act. 

This week will be one of the festival's 
busiest, with the two-week run of Bern- 
stein's one act opera "Trouble In Tahiti" 
opening Wednesday night. Also featured 
on this program will be songs from several 
of Bernstein's shows, including some from 
his famous "Mass." 

Friday night, pianist, conductor and long 
time friend of Bernstein Lukas Foss will 
conduct Bernstein's Symphony No. 2, 

"Age of Anxiety." Foss will be performing 
with the festival orchestra. 

The Hartford Ballet will perform a world- 
premiere dance to Bernstein's composition 
"Prelude, Fugue and Riffs," on Saturday 
and Sunday nights. Also on the program 

will be a dance to music written by Foss. 



10 colle gian 



rvar* v>F<i4 



l<»^: 



d *l» 8« tl » MW I ' ^ -« •« ^>^ • • ■ •««-*< 



'nr^ . 



I Wadneftdav. Juty 42, 1 978 



RRM team wins finals 
in intramural softball 




By GENE GRZYWNA 

A Softball team from the Residentia 
Resource Managerr>ent Office is the First 
Summer Session Intramural Softbal 
Champion. Joe Scanlnn's team defeated 
the Midnight Ashcans in the finals, 5-3 
This was a well-plaved contest by both 
teams. RRM came into the finals with a 3-3 
record, while the Ashcans had a perfect 6-0 
mark spoiled. These two teams had met 
three times previously during the regular 
season and the Ashcans came out on top 
on all three occasions; 15 14, 12-4, and 

Random Walk was a team that entered 
the last week of competition with a 4-0 
record, and went down to two straight 
defeats: to the Space Cadets 18 4 (in the 
final regular season ganne) and to the 
Ashcans 8-1 (in the first round of the 
playoffs) 



nham s tnree hits, Craig Pulliam, Paul 
Daley, and Carl Berquist with two hits, and 
Pulliam and Tom O'Connor with round tnp- 
pe's 

Finals: 
RRM 5, Ashcans 3 - A see saw game that 
was decided by some long ball hitting, and 
some shoddy defense by the outfielders 
Pitcher Craig Pulliam snuffed out tne 
Ashcan hitting attack, and also had a 
perfect three-for-three appearance at the 
plate (including a home run). Teammate 
Brad Brandts shipped in with three hits 
also The Ashcans had only six hits in the 
game, Bnan Stay.isr had a home run With 
the score tied at twc, Puliiam hit his homer 
to put RRM up by one, and Stagner 
countered with a home run blow m the next 
inning 

Tennis Result*. 
Ashe League Bob Gamache over Philip 
McSweeney in a win by forfeit (WBFI. 



s^oOFF 

on 
Jacques Cohen's 

PAMELA 
ESPADRILLE 



SpORTS 




% 



^>>v o 



Summer wouldn't be summer 

without this authentic 

jct-settcr cspadrille from Jacques Cohen 

Beige, yellow, green; also 

brown, red, navy, black 

A-top Classic rope-wrap wedge 



0-40% of:: 

Shirts 

Pants n' tons 

and shorts 



Wednesday, Ju(y 12, 1978 





eiMA 



COrVJTEMPORARV SPORTSWEAP 

'21 1 Main Si. i\^ \ IMcasimi Si 

A nil u* I si Nori lijiiupioii 



.1 



bottball Highlights: 
Space Cadets 18, Random Walk 4 Pitcher 
Ciaf Brynjolfsson had a homer and Bruce 
Morra two hits for the losers; Randy 
Krut/ler. Steve Telander and Bill Heigl, two 
hits each for Space 

First Round Playoff Action: 
RRM 12, Space Cadets 11 - A close game 
that was decided hy some sloppy defense 
by Space as they threw the ball around 
wildly Jeff Spooner and Brooks Sweet had 
two safties for Space RRM was led by Bir- 



Borg League ;\'jlief Howard over Tony 
Grigonis (6 6 1' and David Phoenix 
(WBF>, Alan Patrick over Ray Ricketts 
(10-71; Fred Alibozek over Steve Fox (6 1, 
46 6^0). and Ricketts over Alttx}zek 
(12 10). 

Casals League (Women s Singlesl - 
Marabeth Clapp over Fl(;abeth Maithews 
(10 1), over Mary Jane Quinn '. 10-7) and 
over Kathy Thomas (10-5). Sh&ron Wielgus 
stayed unt>eaten with a 10- 1 victory over 
Matthews. Quinn de^&ated Ann Koski 
(10-61. 



IM sports notice 



Those undergraduates who wish to ref>ew 
their recreation stickers for the Second 
Summer Session nnay do so now by paying 
S5 00 at the Bursars Office m Whitmore, 
This would apply also to those 
undergraduates who are just taking courses 
dunng the Second Summer Session. The 
receipt from the Bursa 's Office should be 
taken to the Boyden Ticket Office (Room 
255) from 8 am. to 12, and 12:30 to 3 p.m., 
where you would receive the actual sticker 
Stickers from the First Summer Session are 
only good to July 1 1 

Irtramural Individual and Team Entry 
Forms may be filled out at the Intramural 
Office, Room 215 Boyden. Competitive 
leagues will be set up for the following 
sports if there are enough entries. Sports to 
t)e offered in the Second Summer Session 
with Entry Deadlines, and Tentative Star 
ting Dates (in parentheses) follow: 

SOFTBALL & VOLLEYBALL - 7/19 (7/24) 



TENNIS 7/24(7/26) 

a) Men's Singles 

b) Women's Singles 

c) Men's Doubles 

d) Women's Doubles 

e) Mixed Doubles 

SQUASH PADDLEBALL& 
RACQUETBALL 7/25 (7 27) 

CROSS COUNTRY- 8' 1 (8/1) 

Anyone interested in participating in an In- 
tramural Sport must have a valid Recrea 
tional Sticker in order to compete Informa 
tion on obtaining a sticker may be obtained 
by either stopping by the Intramural Office 
(Room 215 Boyden) or calling 
545 2693 545 3334 

Revised Schedule for Boyden Pool 
(Monday- Friday; closed on weekends) 
from July 5 through August 22: 

1 00 2 00 p m. Lap Swim 

3 30 6 30 p. m Open Swim 



C&CLIQUORS 



BEHIND THE POLICE STATION 
fOP SUDDEN SERVICE DELIVERY 753309 1 



St. Paul! Girl $3.39 

Six Pack 



Vodka 1.75,., $8.99 

Liter 



Cigarettes $5.65 

Carton 



German Wine „ $1.49 

Bottle 




sCoilggi^ii 



They found me 
in the classifieds! 

COLLEGIAN 

CLASSIFIEDS ARE 

PURRjy 

DARN GOOD! 




1 E. Pleasant 

Amherst 

549-6904 



ilKfcS SKATkt«AI»i ZCSKIS 

Invites You To Test Drive Our Shoes on our New 

Treadmill in our "Locker Room" 



• Hygrade 

• Rattinger 

• Fastrak 

• Hygrade 

• Sports International 


featuring such names as: 

• Gymkin 

• Pony 

• Elmer Weights 

• Franklin 

• Mountain Works 


• Puma 

• Duke 

• Brooks 

• Wigwam 

• Yoney 



tayt 

WEDNESDAY 

MICHELOB NIGHT 

Frtt MynebiM 

12 oz. 60^ Bottles 



IdON'T forget - HAPPY HOUR DAILY 

5 - 8 p.m. 

Monday all Nite long 

M iller draughts 35 
Most bar drinks 75 

1 Pny SL, Anlnrst S48-5403 Niit ti tfci Pufc 



There IS a difference!!! 



PREPAHE FOR: 



if^\ 




And a fabulous new selection of running & swimwear 



Peloton Inc. 

1 E. Pleasant. Amherst 549-6904 
opei every day, Thurs. till 9PM 



Ou( broad range of programs provides an umbrella of testing know-how that en 
abies js to ot^er the best preparation available, no matter which course is taken — 
Small cic' sses taught by SH'iled instructors • Voluminous home-studv materials con- 
stantly u Jdaied by expert researchers • Permanent Center open days evenings & 
weeKenrJs and statted by dedicated personnel • Complete tape facilities for review 
of ciasj lessons and study of supplementary materials • mter-Branch transfers • 
Oppnrunities to make up missed lessons • Low hourly cost 



MCAT Classes Now in Session! 
1 here's Still Time to Enroll 
Call 253-2260 for More Info , 



College Boards • LSAT • OAT* OCAT • VAT • VOE • ECFMG • FLEX 
National Medical 8 Dental Boards • 



Nursing Boards 



COf^E V.SIT OURCENTER 

264 N Pleasant St. 
A^lherst, Mass 01002 

(413) 253 2260 




MPUN 

EDUCATIONAL CENTER 



I 

C9^Ktest preparation 
specialists since 1938 



Hunan offers variety 
of Chinese food 



Hunan Gardens 

By DON LESSER 

If you are like nne, simply dining out can be 
the event of the evening. There is nothing 
like good food and a few drinks for in- 
itiating a conversation that can go into the 
wee hours. But even if dinner is only a 
prelude to the evening's entertainment, 
you'll leave the Hunan Garden satisfied and 
ready for anything. An average dinner will 
set you back $10-15 plus drinks, but it is 
one of the best Chinese restaurants in the 
area and the only one that serves 
Szechuanese and Hunanese dishes. 

Hunan Garden's owner. Tin Kee Ng, was 
part owner of the Hunan Restaurant in 
Cambridge a few years back and the Hunan 
Garden bears a distinct resembjance to that 
well-known Cambridge eatery. Hunan 
Garden serves similar Polynesian mixed 
drinks, has similar house specials and pays 



tions of vegetables are available with 
chicken, beef, pork, lamb or seafood, but 
the S2echuan dish reigns supreme. 

The beef is best experienced as Orange 
Flavor Beef ($4,551, which may sound 
outlandish but the orange essence and the 
Szechuan peppercorns combine to pro- 
duce a taste that is at once strangely 
familiar, sweetish and exotic. The dish 
comes garnished with straw mushrooms, 
looking for all the world like Fantasia's dan- 
cing variety, but being canned (as are all 
the straw mushrooms I've had on the East 
Coast), they add little to the taste. 

Feeling obliged to sample at least one 
non Sechuanese dish, we tried the Moo 
Shi Pork ($3.95). This is a combination of 
slivered bamboo shoots, bok choy, 
mushrooms and scrambled egg that is served 
with four Chinese pancakes. The mixture is 
spooned onto the center of one of the pan- 
''akes, which resemble crepes in their 
liv. itness, and rolled into a tidy package. 



Food 



the same attention to the preparation of its 
food The food is well-seasoned and con- 
siderately peppered. Dishes ordered 
iT^edium hot produce a comfortable warmth 
in the back of the mouth without obscuring 
the taste of the other ingredients. 

The Hot and Sour Soup (.95) was made 
from a pork stock that could benefit from 
more pork, but my companion pointed out 
that the soup had been more strongly 
flavored on a previous visit. It could be 
more hot and sour, but as this is one of the 
few Items prepared in advance, this is at- 
tributable to the management's not wan- 
ting to shock tender palates Vinegar and 
hot pepper are available and I suggest you 
avail yourselves of them. Other soups are 
offered, from the everpresent Wonton (.95) 
to Sizzling Rice with Shrimp or Chicken 
($2.55 for 2). Appetizers range from two 
egg rolls ($2.10) to a giant Pu Pu Platter 
($8,251. 

Chicken dishes include several Szechuan 
specialties, such as the Szechuan Diced 
Chicken ($4.55) or the Strange Flavor 
Chicken with Chinese Vegetables. The 
strange flavor is due in part to the use of 
Szechuan peppercorns, which are hotter 
than the European variety and have a 
spicier aftertaste. The vegetables are Snow 
Peas, Bok Choy, black mushrooms and 
Cloud's Ear fungus, which resembles black 
seaweed or gelatin. Standards like Moo 
Shi, Sweet and Sour and various combina 



This Moo Shi left a taste that can only be 
described as friendly and is definitely 
recommended. 

The restaurant's seafood list is extensive 
and would require several visits to exhaust. 
Titles such as Dragon and Phoenix (lobster 
and chicken in a tomato based sauce, 
($5.75), Lake Tung Ting Shrimp ($6.25), Yu 
Hsiang Scallops ($5.25) or Shanghai Fish 
($5.55) simply cry out to be eaten. 

Not being content to stop there, Hunan 
Garden offers lamb, duck (Peking Duck is 
available without the customary 24 hours 
notice, for $15.00 a duck), vegetable 
dishes, bean curd dishes and Chinese 
noodles which are available with everything 
from vegetables (Subgum for $4.95) to 
chicken, pork or beef ($3.95) or shrimp 
($4.25). In short, they offer too much and 
the temptation to add an order of Tangy 
and Spicy Green Beans ($3.25) or Pan- 
Fried Peking Noodles ($3.25) can prove 
overwhelming. One way around this is to 
try one of their 20 luncheon specials, which 
range from the Peking Noodles at $1.25 to 
Szechuan Chicken or Shrimp with Chinese 
Cabbage or Beef with Snow Pea Pods for 
$2.95 (soup and rice included) with many - 
stops in between. 

Hunan Garden is on Route 9 by Poor 
Richard's and is open 11 30 to 10 seven 
days a week. Master Charge and Visa credit 
cards are accepted. 



Notices 



OFF CAMPOS HOUSING OFFICE 

Summer hours at the Off Campus Hous 
ing Office are Monday through Friday 8 
a.m. to 4 p.m. and Thursday evenings from 
6 to 8 p.m. The office will also be open 
Saturdays beginning in August. For more 
information call 545 0865 or go to the Off 
Campus Housing Office in the basement of 
Munson Hall. 

MONO AD A CELEBRATION 
A cultural and educational celebration of 



friendship between U.S. and Cuban people 
will be held Saturday, July 5 from noon to 6 
p.m. on the Amherst Town Common. The 
program, sponsored by the Committee for 
the Moncada Celebratidn, will feature 
music, poetry, speakers, food and exhibits. 

In case of rain the program will be held in 
the Grace Episcopal Church behind the 
common. 




C()ll<.- v>i.ni. 



(Wednesday, July 19, 1978 



tIie pockET MiME tNeatre 



ri'':':5^^.- 



MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 



VOLUME V. ISSUES 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 1978 




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Boston's award winning Pocket Mime 
Theatre will appear Wednesday. July 19, at 
8 p m in Bowker Auditorium in 
Stockbridge Hall. The Pocket Mime 
Theatre will present a collection of original 
works, both comic and dramatic. 

The Pocket Mime Theatre is the only 
mime company in the United States to 
l-mamtain a resident theatre, and they have 



been p)ertorming continuously for five years 
in Boston. This will be their first ap- 
pearance in the Amherst area. 

The Pocket Mime Theatre will be artists- 
in residence at the University during the 
week of July 16. During their stay on cam- 
pus, they will instruct Mime Appreciation 
and Mime Workshop, two week-long 



workshops offered through the Summer 
Arts Hostel program 

Tickets to the Wednesday evening per- 
formance will be available at the door. Ad- 
mission will be free for Summer Arts Hostel 
participants, 50 cents for Summer Session j 
students, $1 for children and sertior 
Citizens, and $2 for the genera) public 



ThEATRE 



"Casualties, " a drama, will be the third 
presentation in the Commonwealth Stage's 
Theatre In The Works series, this Friday 
and Saturday evening, July 21 and 22 at 8 
p.m. at the Rand Theater in the Fine Arts 
Center. 

"Casualties, ' by Karolyn Neike, is set just 
after World War I in a small rural town on 
the Hudson River in upstate New York. The 
play revolves around the difficulties and 
frustrations encountered by separate pairs 
of lovers. 

Reservations can be made by calling the 
Rand Theater box office at 545-351 1 . 



The Mount Holyoke College Summer 
Theatre will present "The Philadelphia 
Story," by Philip Barry, this week in the 
"Festive Tent" on the Mount Holyoke cam- 
pus Performances are July 19, 20, 21, and 
22. For tickets call the box office at 
5382406 

CONCERTS 

Mink DeVille and the George T. Gregory 
Band will be appearing Thursday, July 27, 
by the Campus Center Pond in a free con- 
cert. The concert, which will run from 3:20 
to 7.00 p.m., will be held on the Fine Arts 
Center lawn and will be open to the public. 
Concessions will be available. No bottles or 
cans allowed. The concert is sponsored by 
the Summer Activities Program. 



Drumsong, ' a percussion perforrnance 
starhng David Moss, will be presented on 
Wednesday, July 26, at 8 p.m. in the Cam- 
pus Center Auditorium. The concert is 
sponsored by the UMass Summer Ac- 
tivities Program. Tickets may be purchased 
at the door. 



Fil 



M 



The film "Bugsy Malone ' will be shown in 
the Campus Center Auditorium, Tuesday, 
July 25, at 7:30 and 9; 15 p.m. Admission is 
free. 

bugsy Malone" is a nostalgic gangster 
musical cast entirely with children, It is be- 
ing presented as part of the UMass Sum- 
mer Film Series. 



$80m 



UMass gets 



a budget boost 



$75m 



$70m 



$65m 



1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 

expenditures budget 



Wednesday, July 19, 1978, 



Exceeds $80 milUon 



.Colle gian i 



UMass budget takes a jump 



By MARK LECCESE 

Laboratory equipment, library acquisi- 
tions and handicapped services will be top 
priorities in the spending of the $80 million 
budget that the State Legislature voted for 
UMass- Amherst's next fiscal year, ac- 
cording to campus Budget Director George 
Beatty, Jr. 

When totalled up, the budget exceeds $80 
million, which is the largest budget ever for 
this campus and is nearly a 10 percent in- 
crease over last year's budget. 

Baatty said, however, that because of in- 
a«ases in utilities costs, this year's budget 
would have an actual increase of only $2.2 
million. 

The State Legislature also voted to ex- 
empt students who eat in dining commons 



with slim budgets in the fiscal years of 
1975, 1976 and 1977. 'Inflation will take a 
toll; plus cost of living increases will be a 
big amount of money," she said. 

Five departments here at UMass- Amherst 
submit lists of priorities to Budget Director 
Beatty. According to Beatty, the money 
from the budget then filters down through 
a "multi-tiered" process, where each 
department and sections of departments 
budget the money they receive. 

The five major categories that had listed 
priorities submitted to Beatty were 
academic programs, academic support, 
student services, institutional support, and 
physical plant. 

Academic programs received an 11.12 
percent increase and listed as priorities 
laboratory equipment, filling staff vacan- 



Officials say because 

of increased utiiities 

and ot/ier costs, 

tfie actual Increase 

will only be $2.2 million. 



or fraternities and sororities from paying 
the state meals tax of 5 percent. This will 
amount to a saving for each student of 
almost $50 per semester. 

Included in this year's budget is a $77.4 
million initial appropriation, a $562,500 
allocation for library acquisitions, and $2.7 
million, in a separate account, for cost of 
living increases for UMass-Amherst 
employees. 

Beatty said he was "optimistic and 
ganeratly pleased, but somewhat cautious" 
about the new budget. 

University Budget Director Katharine H. 
Hanson last week said, "I wouldn't say this 
is the end-all budget, but it is a very good 
one." 

Total appropriations for the University 
were $120 million, including nearly $4 
million in cost of living increases. 

Hanson said this budget would benefit the 
UMass Medical School in Worcester. "The 
hospital is well under way - it should do 
quite nicely," she said. 

Next year will be the first time the UMass 
Medical School will fill its enrollment 
capacity of 400 students, according to Han- 
son. This had been planned before the 
budget had t>een passed, but, Hanson said, 
"If the budget were lower, they might have 
had a real problem." 

Hanson said the budget would not totally 
recover the losses the University suffered 



cies and supporting academic budgets. 

1,464 academic staff positions, mostly for 
faculty members, were authorized in fiscal 
year 1978, and, as of last February, 113 of 
those positions were vacant. 

According to Beatty, as many as 40 va- 
cant faculty positions may be filled under 
this budget. 

Also able to be filled this year may be as 
many as 30 non-academic professional jobs 
and 106 classified jobs, which include 
secretarial, clerical and other positions. 

The top academic support priority will be 
buying new books and other materials for 
the library. "This is a great boon for the 
library," Hanson said. 

According to Hanson, no new books have 
been budgeted for the UMass-Amherst 
library in the past two fiscal years. 

Under student services, top budget priori- 
ty will be given to service and renovations 
for the handicapped, as was mandated by 
federal law. 

Also, priorities for student services will be 
increased counseling services and an ex- 
panded UMass Placement Service, which 
will help graduates find jobs. 

University Budget Director Hanson said, 
"This budget proves that we will continue 
to be the leaders in the Commonwealth." 

Hanson also said the State Legislature 
showed "clear support for the University in 
terms of the vote." 



Wood gets Boston post 



Former UMass President Robert C. Wood 
yesterday was appointed superintendent of 
the Boston Public School System by a 
unanimous vote of the Boston School 
Committee. 

Wood, who served as University president 
from 1970 to 1977, decided last month to 
seriously consider the Boston post, and 
decided not to announce his candidacy for 
the U.S. Senate. 

The other contender for the post until 
yesterday was Gordon L. McAndrew, 
superintendent of schools in Gary, Ind. 
since 1968. 

Wood last month said that if he was ap- 
pointed superintendent he would work to 
upgrade the Pston school system, for it is 



"the key to urban renewal, renaissance and 
revitalization." He added, "If we can get a 
good big-city school system, we can keep 
the young families in the city and build up 
the neighborhoods. 

Wood is a nationally known educator, ur- 
banologist and political scientist. As UMass 
president, he advocated strongly the im- 
portance of public education in 
Massachusetts. He was adviser to Presi- 
dent John F. Kennedy on urban affairs, and 
in 1966 he became first undersecretary of 
the U.S. Department of Housing and Ur- 
ban Development. 

"LAURA KENNEY 





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Collins says budget 
will strengthen UM 



State Rep. James G. Collins, D- 
Amherst, last week called the budget 
allocated to UMass by the State 
Legislature "a turn of the tide for 
public higher education.' 

Collins said this year's budget was 
"important in terms of changing 
what would have been a downward 
slide" in public higher education. / 

"It is a turnaround of what were 
nearly disastrous years for the 
University: 1975, 1976 and 1977." 
Collins said. "^ 

The UMass budget suffered a $4 
million cut in 1976, and was level- 
funded in 1977. 



Collins said he also feels it is impor 
tant that UMass go into the proposed 
reorganization of state higher educa- 
tion this spring with a strong budget. 

"This will put the University in a 
position of strength, " Collins said. 
"It is important not to have UMass 
hobbled by budqet cuts." 

Collins said with the University hav- 
ing a string budget, "public and 




private education 
equals.' 



i,an meet as 



James G. Collins 



MARK LECCESE 



I VA>nc->4lcnii 



I Wednesday, July 19, 1978 



Madson to work for^ with students 



Wednesday. July 19, 1978, 



7 plan to be 

a lot more active 
in terms of 



wm 



communications, ' 



'l\/ladson 



By LAURA KENNEY 



"The vice chance/tor for student affairs is 
responsible for student support services 
and non classroom student activities in- 
cluding security, admissions and records, 
career planning and placement, financi^ 
aid. and related activities As tfte chief stu 
dent affmrs officer for the campus, the vice 
chancellor for student affairs is responsible 
for tfte oveeaM supervision of departments 
providing support services directed 
towards enhancing and facilitating the 
academic needs of students. " 

University Factbook 



"The vice chancellor for student affairs 
has an intermediary role He ftas the 
responsibility to other administrators to 
make them understand tfte students' pro- 
btams, and to make students see ad- 
ministrators ' rationale ' ' 

Dennis L Madson. ryewfy selected vice 
chancellor for student affairs 



Dennis L Madson m an interview last 
week said his two major goals as he begins 
work in September will be to organi2e the 
management of the housing system on 
campus ar>d to make the division of student 
affairs a rrwre cohesive unit. 

Madson earlier this rrionth was chosen by 
Chancellor Randolph W. Bromery for the 
position of vice chancellor, replacing 
Robert L. Woodbury, who has stepped 
down after two years of working as acting 
vica chancellor 

Currently director of student services and 
director of housing ar>d residence educa- 
tion at Colorado State University in Fort 
Collins. Madson said, "One of my 
strengths was to develop a work|f)g rela- 
tionship between the students and faculty 
of mutual respect. I hope for that here." 

He said at Colorado State the students 
"have a lot of voice" in decisions and 
policies. 'At Colorado there s a lot of the 
same atmosphere as there is here," Mad 
son said. "The student body is dedicated 
and involved, especialy through the stu- 
dent government. Students should 
definitely have a very large input into the 
University." 

Madson said he is m favor of a student 
lease for on-campus residents, which 
would explain conditions for fee paynnent, 
room choosing, duration of occupancy, 
damage policy, and a rebate schedule. 
Each student signing the lease would enter 
into a contractual agreement with the 



University whereby each party would be 
bound to legal obligations. 

The lease proposal, which has been in the 
works for nine months, wil be presented for 
approval to the UMass Board of Trustees in 
September Included in the lease proposal 
IS the formation of a residential committee, 
to be comprised of a majority of students, 
which would recommend policy to the vice 
chancellor for student affairs. 

"The lease is a very realistic, reasonable 
kind of idea," Madson said. "It spells out 
responsibility on the part of students and 
the University: it's a useful thing to have in 
writing." 

Me said at Colorado there is a committee 
on housing and food services, much like 
the proposed residential committee for this 
campus, which involves a "good cross- 
section of people - a custodian, a 
maintenance person, the director of food 
services, the director of housing and the 
student assistant, residence asistants and 
heads of residence. I'd like to develop a 
committee like that here," he said. 

Madson said that at Colorarjo State, only 
freshmen are required to live on campus. 
He said the atmosphere in the dormitories 
there has improved so that "the number of 
upperclassmen opting to live in the dorms 
has increased over the years." He said the 
lease proposal here may bring about such 
an improvement. 

Juniors on this campus last month were 
exempted from the mandatory housing re- 
quirement. Previously only seniors, 
veterans and married students were ex- 
empt from the requirement. 

Madson said he will work toward increas- 
ing dorm maintenance and renovation. 
"We'll have to have a well thought-out, 
well planned repair and replacement pro- 
gram," he said Having toured the dorms, 
Madson said he saw many differences in 
their conditions, and that he would be 
"pushing to somehow round up the money 
to bring all the buildings up to the highest 
possible quality." 

Discussing possible housing crises like the 
one which occurred last fat, leaving 400 
freshmen without dorm room assignments, 
Madson said, "People have to predict pro- 
blems. Good managers are needed; 
preventative nnanagement is the key." 

Madson said it is "important to prevent 
the escalation of problems" when dealing 
with psssible demonstrations, such as the 
April occupation of the Whitmore ad- 
ministration building where about 100 
students protested housing conditions. 



SIDEWALK SALE! 



Ana/ys/s pad 



Bound notebooks * 

Lab notebooks 

w/ dupkcate sheets 

3 ■ R/ng green notebook paper 
6 X 9'/e 



69* 



45' 



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at A.J. Hastings 
neivsdealer and stationer 

45 S. Pleasant St. * Amherst 




NewUy selected vice-charH^allor for atudam affairs Dannia L. MmIsoo. 



He said, "It's also importart to be 
available and open to student leaders, to 
solve problems before they escalate into 
protests. I plan to be a lot more active in 
t«rms cf communications." 

He said he vievy^ his biggest task in the fall 
as "providing some sense of cohesiveness, 
leadership for the division (of student af- 
fairs)." "A pulling together is necessary, a 
feeling that we're all working for students, 
with students in the division . " Madson said 
that Woodbury as actino vice chancellor 
"couldn't provide t'u : r:..>v" 

necessary for the departrr ■ • 



Madson, 40, received his bachelor'a* 
degree from St. Olaf College in 1960, his 
master's degree from Springfield College in 
1961 , and his doctoral degree in counseling 
and student personnel administration from 
Ohio University in 1966. 

Prior to his employment at Colorado 
State, Madson had been director of stu- 
dent residence, assistant professor of 
education, assistant dean of men and in- 
structor in human relations at Ohio Univer- 
sity. He is the author of a number of srtides 
on topics about residence halls, students' 
use of alcohol, and the campus press and 
tho law. 



Bernstein fest ends this week 



The Leonard Bernstein Festival of 
American Music will end its three- 
week run here this weekend, with 
four performances of Bernstein's 
comic opera "Trouble In Tahiti," a 
concert by mezzo-soprano Florence 
Quivar and the Festival Orchestra, 
and the Gala Festival Ball. 

Performances of "Trouble In Tahiti" 
will be in Bezanson Recital Hall at 8 
p.m. on July 19, 20, 21 and 22. Also 
on the program will be a collection of 
songs by Leonard Bernstein. The Ju- 
Iv 22 show will be at 3 p.m. 



Florence Quivar, nriezzo-soprano 
from New York^s Metropolitan 
Opera, will perform a program that 
includes Bernstein's Symphony No. 
1, Sur>d8y, Jufy 23, in the Fir>e Af<e 
Center Concert Hall at 8 p.m. 

The Gala Festival Ball, featuring tha 
Festival Orchestra, will be held Satur- 
day, July 22, on the 10th floor of tha 
Campus Center. 

Tickets to "Trouble In Tahiti." are 
$6, with student discounts. Tickets 
for Florence Quivar are $7, $6 and $5. 
For more information, call tha Fine 
Arts Center Box office at 545-251 1 . 



/' ' /^ 

MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 



Osiiiii 




-.o 



V 



Co editor 

LAURA M KENNEY 
Co editor 

MARK A LECCESE 

BusuK'ss MdddytT 

LAURK A WOOD 
Gf.iphics MdHciqer 

BARBARAS LAMKIIVi 



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i1,iy Msy 31 1978lhiouyr' Auyiist If, 11 W mrios.vp 



iiiiiiimj,^^^ttM'*'"'^^ii" 



11111 



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TTTT tlllllllllllllllf TTT mr 

I nfraK it's time 

to run down to 

FtNTON S for your 

ATHLETIC SHOES? 










377 Main Street, Amherst 



253-3973 







>••••••••••••••••••••• 






■Colle gians 



Students' reasons vary 
for coming to UMass 



By MARK LECCESE 

The people who run the New 
Students' Program, better known as 
"summer orientation," keep a lot of 
statistics, and the one they are prou- 
dest of is this: 90 percent of the 
people who attend a summer orienta- 
tion session say they are "looking 
forward" to coming to UMass in the 
fall. 

"One of my goals is making them 
want to come back in the fall, " said 
Sarah Hamilton, director of the New 
Students' Program. 

Close to 6000 people pass through 
some sort of summer orientation pro- 
gram, and according to Hamilton, 
her staff tries to present the Universi- 
ty to all these people "in a positive 
but realistic manner," and teach 
tf>em 'assertive behavior." 

In addition to teaching them that 
the only way to handle the university 




Vw 



Sarah Hamifton 



bureaucracy is through assertive 
behavior, Hamilton says that her pro- 
gram also tries to give new students 
information so they can make in- 
telligent choices on courses and liv- 
ing areas, and to teach them of the 
sprawling lay-out of the campus and 
the resources that are available to 
students. 

Operating out of two large offices in 
the basenr^ent of Thatcher dormitory 
in Northeast, the New Students Pro- 
gram has a staff of 30 councelors and 
eight people who work on tha 
logistics of the program's various 
workshops, informal sessions and 
social events. 

From talking to new students, one 
gets the impression that UMass' in- 
state reputation at the public high 
schools has not improved - every 
new student who was asked what 
the people at their high school 
though of UMass gave the same 
response - "ZooMass." 

But there were as many reasons for 
coming to UMass as there were new 
students. 

"My parents can afford it. and I 
didn't want to go to Greenfield Com 
munity College A big campus seems 
like an exciting, interesting place. 
You could meet a lot of different peo 
pie," said Judy Landress, 18, from 
Greenfield. 

"You see all these people here from 
Florida and Maryland," she said, 
"and you wonder what they're doing 
here. They all say it's a good 
school." 

Gary Martin, 18, from Winchester, 
said simply, "I just had an urge that 
UMass was as good as any other 
school." 

Jack Chandler of Amherst pointed 
out ^hat, at his high school, UMass 
was considered "an alternative to 
college." 




Denis3 Furlong, 17, from Hyde Kark 
said, "I haven't decided yet on a ma- 
jor and I think this is the best place to 
decide. There is such a wide range of 
choices." 

Opinions at private schools about 
UMass may be a little different from 
the opinions at public schools. 
William McCarthy, 18, a graduate of 
Phillips Academy in Andover said, "It 
sounded good, looks good. I've 
heard only good things about it. 
Other students joke about it a lot, but 
they didn't do any research into it." 



Some people who have worked for 
the New Students' Program for a few 
years feel that students entering 
UMass have changed. 

"People have mellowed in the past 
4 years," said Melissa Owen, who 
has been a New Students' councelor 
since the summer of 1975. 

"They are a lot more senous They 
dress up to come here. That's not all 
that important, but it reflects, I think, 
their attitude," she said. 



An outsider's view 



A paren t/oo/csat Ul\/lass 



Editor's Note: This column by Alexander C. 
Hutchison, publisher of the Greenfield 
Recorder, appeared in the Recorder July 
12. It is reprinted here by permission. 

By Alexander C. Hutchison 

The young man with the auburn hair and 
the good-natured smile was telling a 
busload of apparently skeptical adults just 
how good the University of Massachusetts 
actually is. 



OANSKIN 



X 




10 I Mm III 

Downtown Amherst 



He was telling them in a way that sug- 
gested he had endured this routine before, 
had encountered the obvious doubts of his 
audience, had wearied of explaining what 
shouldn't need explaining, but he wtj do- 
ing it quietly and with conviction. 

"Look," he said. "I come from California, 
and everyone knows California's reputation 
for good colleges. I came here because the 
University of Massachusetts is a very good 
university." 

In fact, he added for good measure, he 
understands it is regarded elsewhere as the 
third best state university in America. He 
didn't name the first two or say who did the 
rating. 



But his point was clear: The good people 
of Massachusetts are far too ready to put 
down their own very fine state university, 
to see its worst side and not its best side. 

The skeptical adults on the bus were tour- 
ing the campus as part of a program for the 
parents of new students. They were being 
shown films, given lectures, escorted 
through some typical dormitories and en- 
couraged to ask a lot of questions. 

The questions betrayed their uncertain- 
ties, their doubts about this somewhat con- 
troversial state university where men and 
women Ithey no longer are boys and girls) 
often share the same floor and facilities in 
the dorms, where occasional protest 



says 

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MICNELOB NIGHT 

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12 oz. 60^ Bottles 



IDON'T forget - HAPPY HOUR DAILY 

5 - 8 p.m. 

Monday all Nite long 

Miller draughts 35 
Most bar drinks 75 



1 Priy St.. Amherst 



M9-5403 



Next to the f^iib 



demonstrations take place, where com- 
plaints about heavy drinking, loud music 
and uncouth behavior are routine. 
"I heard this campus was practically an 
armed camp last semester," one father 
with a broad Boston accent observed. 

Not so, replied a student who was assigned 
to answer the parents' questions. She 
went on to say something about the news 
media playing up the bad side of 
everything, that the occupation of the cam- 
pus newspaper offices (which is the inci- 
dent to which the Boston father referred) 
had been sensationalized in the press. 
Well, she was off base, too, but tha 
answer satisfied - or appeared to satisfy - 
the worried father who was about to send 
his first-born out into adulthood in a 
strange environment, a frightening one. 

"I hear there's a real alcohol problem on 
this campus," a mother piped up. 

"That's right," the Californian replied, and 
the other students present agreed with 
him. But look, folks, there's an alcohol pro- 
blem in your neighborhood high school, 
and maybe even in your junior high school, 
and surely in society at large, and a big col- 
lege campus is part of that society. 

It is really up to the new students: They 
can go to the University of Massachusetts 
(or any other college) to get an education 
and prepare for a career, or they can go to 
have a good time, or they can somehow 
manage both, and which course they 
choose will be determined more by where 
they come from, in terms of a family life, 
than by the atmosphere on the campus 
itself. 

Nobody at the parents' session put it into 
just those words, but that woulc appear to 
be a reasonable reading of the entiments 
expressed by the student guide- and most 
of the parents nodded acknowledgement 
of their wisdom. 
But some parents obviously wsre having 
difficulty with the idea of tui-iing their 
"children" loose, especially .vhere the 
sexes are mixed in the dorrri^ and you 
could easily imagine the stern le. sures their 
offspring will hear before th' 
move to Amherst in September 
The student guides were un 
their support of the "open dorr^ 
Where the men and women 
together, rather in separate bi 

TURN . 



actually 



nimous in 
concept. 
ive close 

^ings, the 
PAGE 7 



4 Colle gian. 



tWednesday, July 19, 1978 



Geared toward educating 



New alcohol regulations formed 



By THOMAS MAJOR 

A task force of UMass students and ad- 
ministrators has written a new pd' 
tightening regulations on alcohol use 
carripus whtch is scheduled to be adopted 
by the administration this fall. 

The new policy is designed to stimulate 
rrK>re detailed student party planning ar>d 
alcohol education for parties while bringing 
large parties under tighter control. These 
regulatioru are in addition to the current 
policy which was approved by the UMass 
Board of Trustees in 1974 designed to bnng 
University parties into minimum com- 
pliance with local and state laws. 

The new policy will supplement tf>e 1974 
policy's emphasis on compliance with local 
arKl state law with attention to alcohol 
education and party control. 

There will be three separate sets of regula- 
tions controlling parties according to Xtmr 
Mze. Small parties will be defined as those 
parties with fifteen to seventy-five 
members or guests. Medium will be those 
parties with seventy-five to four hur>dred 
guests, and large parties will be those 
events with over four hundred guests. 

All parties will require clearance in ad- 
vance from appropriate University staff, 
^nriall parties will need clearance 24 hours 
in advance, medium parties must be 
cleared at least one week m advance, and 
large parties will be cleared at least one 
rrmnth in advance, while the preliminary 
planning for large events must be submit- 
ted to the Student Activities Office at leest 
60 days m advance. 

What will make this policy unique in com- 
parison to othier college alcohol policies will 
be Its attention to detail. According to Dr. 
David P Kraft, head of the task force, no 
other university except Michigan State will 
have a policy as comprehensive as ours." 

The task force was appointed by former 
Acting Vice-chancellor for Student Affairs 
Robert L Woodbury on Nov 3, 1977 The 
force consisted of nine staff members arxl 
eight student representatives who met a 
total of eight tinr>es between Dec. 1977 arxl 
April 1978. Anxjng staff representatives 
were Dean of Student Affairs William F. 
Field, Saul Chafin, former director of the 
Department of Public Safety, and directors 
or associate directors of three residential 
areas and the Campus Center. The studem 



AAJ. 



nn 






« 



_r 



representatives included former Student 
Governrr>ent Association Co-president 
Marion L. Batiste, Greek Council President 
Paul Leahy, and representatives from all 
five residential area governments. 

The task force discussed two areas of 
alcohol use: the consumption of alcohol at 
parties and other social events, and the 
disruptive behavior which resulted from the 
consumption of alcohol by individuals and 
small groups The theme of these discus- 
sions was to devise new recommer>dations 
to minimize the potential adverse conse- 
quences related to alcohol use. 

The regulations which the task force 
recommended for adoption by the start of 
the fall semester adheres to five principles: 
the enhancement of the social nature of 
panies. the increasing of opportunities for 
resporwible decision-owking about alcohol 
use or non-use, the creation of rules that 
were clear, responsible, and enforceable, 
and the creation of ne^ regulations which 
the entire University could support arnJ erv 
force. 

In tf>e creation of tf>ese new regulations, 
the task force reviewed the current 1974 
policy, the enforcement of \Vva policy, and 
the recommendations of new regulations 
designed to encourage responsible use of 
alcohol at social events. The task force 
recommended in its final report submitted 
to Woodbury on May 2 that the reviaed 
policy become effective no later tfun this 
September. 

The focus of parties cannot be solely tf>e 
consumption of alcohol. Further, the name 
of tfie event canr>ot irKlude tfie r^nr^e of 
any alcoholic beverage or brand, and th^ 
advertising of the event will be limited to 
campus media with focus of the advertising 
on the social nature of tf>e event. A max- 
imum of four hours will be allo^-ed for serv- 
ing alcohol at parties, with scine extensiona 
to six hours given by the Student Activitiea 
Office. 

The serving of alcohol must stop no later 
tt>an midnight, except for Friday and Satur- 
day parties, which can serve alcohol until 1 
a.m. 

Thie new regulations linnit the alcohol that 
can be purcfiased for an event. Alcohol 
bought for a parry cannot exceed the 
equivalent of one keg of beer for everv 40 



r%laiton In£ 
1 Casi Pleasarvi SI. 
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persons attending. At least 20 percent of 
the refreshment budget for a party must be 
spent for food and the serving of at least 
three non-alcoholic beverages. Any 
medium or large party with a proposed pro- 
fit of over $200 or 50 percent over expenses 
will receive critical review from appropriate 
authorities to iruure compliance with (he 
new regulations. 



Large parties will be required to set aside 
ten percent of the total budget for coverage 
of potential damages and the clean-up 
costs. Clean-up from all parties must be 
completed within twelve hours of the 
event. In addition, all party planners and 
bartenders will be encouraged to read parrv 
phlets and other material on reaponsible 
party plannir>g and execution. 



et cetvpo 
copy copp. 

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233 N. Pleasant St. 
Amherst Carriage Shops 



Wednesday, July 19. 1978, 



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TSampus Tenter "^ 



PRE-MEDS A PRE-DENTS 

Have you ever considered the 
importance admissions com- 
mittees place upon the personal 
essay sections of medical and 
dental school applications? 

With the vast numt>er of other 
applicants being considered it 
is essential for you to have a 
well-written, impressive essay 
Order now our guide to writing 
this vital section of the applica- 
tion and chances are you won't 
have to re-apply next year* 

Pt««s« s«nd copies of OUIOC TO 

WniTIMO SUCCCtSFUL ESSAYS 
FOM MCOCAL AND DCNTAL SCHOOL 
A^^ICATIONS. S«nd SI 2 SO plos 7M 
tor po«t»g« and handling lo 
Pi« PflBial— Bl *Ms lac ft. Sea 9T» 
Laafewk. faaas 7MI7. Pt9»M aiiow 3-« 
waahs lor (ta*i«ary 



Deadly simple to simply deadly 




By DON LESSER 

Tomato sauce does not have to t>e the 
featureless stew that it too often is. There 
are too many times that every herb on the 
shelf, vegetables, meats, Worcestershire 
sauce and enough garlic to perfume Naples 
are chucked into a potful of tomato sauce, 
tomato paste and canned tomatoes in the 
sincere belief that they will combine into 
something transcendent. Not true. 

Tomato sauce can range from the deadly 
simple to the simply deadly and you owe h 
to yourself to taste a simple esser>ce of 
tomato k)efore you attennit another tonnato 
sauce. 

For Mary D'Felice's Deadly Simple 
Tomato Sauce, peel and smash 4 cloves of 
garlic and saute them in about 3 TBS of oil, 
oil and butter or buner until they are slightly 
brown. Discard them and repeat the pro- 
cess. Discard again and add two large cans 
of peeled ground Italian tomatoes. You can 
use whole Italian or regular tomatoes, but 
you should drain about half the liquid off or 
the sauce will be too watery. If you use 
fresh tomatoes add between six ar>d ten 
depending on size. 



RmHERSrs^ 



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BARGAIN DAYS 

Sidewalk Sales 

'^Schedule of Events- 



THURSDAY luly 2U 



SATURDAY l»l> 



•)•) 



to a >* S f m 

AMvisni dotwiowi ia#^C"#'w0 ••••wbw wv 
J»y»f>1i m Itmm P^mH PaHow Amr«e*si common 
■ D9 o^otograi>n#o >r, ^f><>o<i co»iu»»»#» cf>4iu»«*^ 

*'W pruw'Ocd ana tit on 0v«« «1'r«>T CtOlf«»4l 

ipm ■ 7 Mym 

Emtty Oicliiwn 9ttm. ^ijrr.nq ju(.« n%fns (PMt*| An swvd 

«k.nn,f>g Mm %hown pv^f y ^^H ^Ou' Ml \f^P 6«ngs Lor^rWur^-ty 

(_*nt»» 

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IrmMm In Tshttl. Leon«ra B^riftl^tn s only Op9f Bv'ns- 

Xn f***!'-*! f '"r Aft% C^"t*" jMass 



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FRIDAY. lulv 21 

10 am -S pm 

AwiHf >t 0«w»fwH M«rcfi«nls S*tf*«»Hi S*l« 

iowrn«f m Thiw ^Hote Parlour. Amr^#f$i Coi^rT^on 'itw 

phoinqr-^p^ffl '" p*»no<i coMiJ'^^s coitu'Ttes a*p provdvd 

.i"(1 t-' iin nv#' »|rp^l tlotfirsi 

10 a m •• p m 

llei tywch»a fpr ••!• on Common p'ov-dod by ««v«fai 

1 p m -4 p m 

Nohomtoll tirono Howoo Towro ronducleO Dy Amherst 

H,sf,.M, .|t SiK't'lv Aot.ly Si Mt^al 1U \I-V Jo<l«>S lit}fAt>,t 

? pm -S p.m.: 

OM-yMHiiHitf O i m M on Nio Common for c^xidr^n ana 

irTi.iIs Wh^^iBa'-iiw 'a^e^ pa-' waikng "nq lo»i A mo'^ 
.■"d.(f!#»rt hv t^'f Amnpfsf Hp( '*at ht* n#ot i 

3 p m -4 p m 

Ponif CofI flitfoo Uv Brt-^'f Mnon A"-l^rr«l Co'"'"0'> 
1 p m -S p m 

Cmf*V OtCkHtOOn fAm. sLir'ng Jot'f Mdff.t (FMfE*) A' 

rr.,.r F, { pri... 

4 M pm M pm 

Cenlrodonco. tcHur.nq Swadoi* T^.i (FRfff) Opo" to a>i 

(Qps At>•^ ,lt>||•t■•'^ Ar^hptsi Commrn\ 
• p m 

TrowMo In ToWir L^ona^d Br»'"5t*'" » o'^'v op*'a B#rn«(e.., 
FeSHvfll F.ni» Aril* C^nt** UM«n 

Center of distinction 

sponsored h\ 

tlic jmlu-TM iliamhcr ot (.ommcric 



a»i LMWcH w tof taM en Common p'OvmoO t>« trvf»ai 

ArT>^«.'\t •^«r.(,i»,|riis 

Iff a m -S p m 

Aitihmu Oowniown MorchaMa SidoaM* Bala 

JOMTway m Ttmo Pholv ^a»io«» 4m»>e'%» Co'^f^of 'tt* 

I' It 1.1 o«' (lv*» ^t'^^1 iio!'»*»i 
10 M am 

aaaaOC S.<«Mte to tnp i ^o'^aro B»rn«ie.n fasi.vai iParada 

M-'l KM**, •ro*'' l^r Amha'*1 i^om*r\on and proCOVd dc*'' 
NoMI» »''.M^.iMI Strr^l 10 UMat» f'n^ A»n Center i 
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M(>.«-v a l,M-M)f^ Ou.lfthM Cn"^"'., ■ I, Bv'd 

<l n^ttimed riderti 

11 M »m 

Owaaaoi CoHMMMMty Bona concon ociud"<a '"utc d> 

Bp*"^'**'' A"^'»iw^t ( >n..T\o.^ 

11 M am 12 30 pm 

Amtqu* Cart on Oiapiay on Common 

Archttoctwrat WaMia .-.(v-'g 'equ'-i'iv Uom Ar^^fts* l.O'^">0'' 
1 p m -3 itm 

tmMir OwkHioon fiMi. Ma".nq jui<e Ha'r s (Fttf f) Ar. 

(<*.4'rl « ' ■ "U • I'" \'><'^>\ pvpri n.itt no»i' .It tn^ B.|rig« Co*** 
".,,".(. t .-'ti" 

3 pm 
'Tro«at 

B«..»l.. 



In TolirtI' it^^i'A'd Be'x^le.'^ ^ oni> opofa 
f»*M>».tt f •'>!• A*tis CO«>IO» UM.1S* 



... ..• poun UNIQUE auowtitEN old 



HCCISTEM ,1 |. 
" "^ WIN t 

TIME MinnoNS. 

ON OISPIAT ' AMMEHST aNANCH OE 

NORTHAMPTON CO OPEMATIVE aANK 




Peel them by dropping them in boiling 
water, counting to ten and removing with a 
slotted spoon. The skin win sup rignt off. 
Slice them in half lengthwise ar>d renrK>ve 
the seeds with your finger or the back of a 
spoon if you wish. Chop and add to your 
oil. Cook for orte half to one hour or until 



Cook for another fifteen minutes (or until 
the carrots are done) and serve on spaghet- 
ti, rice or by itself. The vegetables should 
not taste raw, but should still have a little 
crunch. If you like, season the cooking 
sauce with one tsp dry or 1 TBS fresh 
chopped basil. 



Food 



the sauce is as thick as you like. Add salt 
and pepper and serve. Deadly simple and 
utterly delicious. 

You can take this basic sauce and cook 
meatballs in it. Brown them first ar>d add 
when the sauce is about half cooked down. 
Or add a pound of Italian sausages and let 
them poach in the sauce as it cooks down. 
The fennel in the sausages will perfume the 
sauce and induce mouth-watering hunger 
in any sausage lover in the vicinity. These 
sausages have a lot of fat in them and this 
can be sucked up in a bulb baster, carefully 
spooned or poured off or the pot can be set 
in the refrigerator for a couple of hours until 
the fat hardens. 



To make a Tomato Vegetable Stew 
flavor your oil with garlic at for Oaadly Sim- 
ple Sauce, and add: 



1 or>ion. chopped 

Vi lb mushrooms, sliced 

1 carrot, grated 

1 stalk celery, cut in small pieces 
Saute for five nninutes or so, add your 
tomatoes and let them cook down. In a 
separate pan, saute: 

1 eggplant, cut In % inch cubes until 
softened thoroughly and add to your 
sauce. When the sauce is nearly ready 
(about fifteen minutes before serving) add: 

1 or 2 zucchini or summer squash, cut in 
small pieces 

2 carrots, cut in small rounds 

1 green (Mppar, cut in ^ inch pieces 
1 onion, sliced thinly 



If you must make a moruiterous sauce, 
here is Vincent Price's recipe for Spaghetti 
Sauce Bolognese I kid you not the man is 
an art collector as well as a recipe collector. 
His cookbook contains many fascirvatir>g 
recipes and reminiscences, not the least of 
which is the french toast served on the 
Seattle to San Francisco Amtrak run. The 
toast, which is cut in triangles, is cooked in 
a regular batter (2 eggs, milk, vanilla and 
cinnamon) but is placed in a warm oven 
when done so that it puffs up, sprinkled 
with powdered sugar and served. It is far 
too sweet, bu; that is another matter. To 
make thesauce, saute lonion.finelyc hopped, 
in 2 TBS butter and 2 TBS olive oil un- 
til soft. Add: 

3 slices bacon, chopped in small pieces 
1 carrot, chopped 

1 stalk celery, chopped 

ar>d saute until lightly browr>ed. Add: 
)^ ground beef 

2 chicken livers, minced 

Stir and cook' until meat is well-brownad. 
Add: 

2 TBS tomato paste 

V^ cup dry white wirw 

1 cup beef stock 

1 strip lemon peel about 2 inches long 
(use only the yellow part - use a vegetable 
peeler to pare it off the lennon) 

1 clove garlic, crushed 

1 bay leaf 
Cover and simmer for 40 minutes, stirring 
occasionally. Remove the bay leaf and 
lemon peel and simmer uncovered until tf>e 
sauce thickens. Just before serving, stir in: 

V* cup cream 
Reheat and serve. Makes one pint. Double 
it for 4 hungry diners. 




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SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938 



6 ( olle j^icjin. 



The Dictators: 
get in on the fun 



The Dictators 

Bloodbrothers 

(Elektra Asylum) 

The history of rock is strewn with many 
talented bands who were the critic's dar 
lings but, for one reason or another, never 
received the mass acceptance or even 
minimal airplay they so lustly deserved 

The Dictators, now comprised of Richie 
Teeter on drums. Top Ten on rythym 
guitar, lyricist Andy Shernoff on bass and 
keyboards, Ross the Boss on lead guitar, 
and last, but never least. Handsome Dick 
Manitoba barking commands on lead 
vocals. 

It's not easy for a band that sings the 
praises of traditional American male past 



It IS this contrast of the engine-revin', 
power-churin' rythym guitars, the piercing 
lead guitar and the hard edge of Dick's 
delivery against the clear harmonizing of 
the rest of the band that makes them so 
aurally enticinq. 

The cover they chose for this LP is a 
masterpiece and would have been suitable 
for Springsteen's latest album had he called 
it Darkness In The Heart Of The Chy. 
The street gang pose The Dictators take on 
the neon semi lit playground pavement is 
an appropriate metaphor for the less 
humorous feel of this record as opposed to 
the previous two. Though they're still 
crooning with their tongues in cheek and 
spitting out funny lines left and right, a few 
of their tunes are tinged with real frustra- 
tion and anger. 



Arts/Music 



times such as crutsin' in their cars, chom- 
ping on pizza and burgers, and pickin' up 
girls these days. 

However, if anyor^e actually took the time 
to take their records for a spin, they would 
reali/e these guys are lampooning those 
topics as well as glorifying them. 

This band might have met with more suc- 
cess up to now had their record label (who 
•re presently paving the road to success for 
the Cars) and their producers, Murray 
Krugman and Sandy Pearlman (who pro- 
duce another leather wearin Hebrw band, 
Blue Oyster Cult) had the sense to promote 
"Sleeping With The T.V On," "Hey 
Boys. or "Steppin" Out" from their 
Manifest Destiny album as potential hit 
singles Anyone of them could have been 
their "Don't Fear The Reaper." 

Due to the departure of Mark (Animal) 
Mendoza, Andy Shernoff takes on the ad 
ded duty of bassist and as a result his 
keytxiards are only minimally used on this 
record. This gives the band a leaner and 
meaner jack-hammering guitar orientation 
not heard since the RanvkPoyyer days of the 
Stooges. Concentrated listening to their 
records awakened me to the realization of 
where Sylvester Stallone gets his side of 
the mouth street-tough accent - it's 
nothing but an imitation of Handsome 
Dick. But, don't get the impression that 
that's the only type of singing heard here. 
There's plenty of vocal harmony in their 
songs backing up Dick's raw lead vocals. 



When growling of the situation in Britain 
the Sex Pistols took a political stance 
( "There's no future in England's drea- 
ming "I, and though the Dictatorsaren't com- 
pletely serious when they laud their 
homeland, pizza, coke and amencan girls in 
"i Stand Tall, " when they look at their 
future it's a completely personal perspec- 
tive, though also not so optimistic: 

"I wonder if its worth being human 
no one listens when I speak 
I'm so young but my future locks hieak 
No tomorrow for me" 



Each of the LP's they've done has a 
remake of a rock classic and their musical 
roots they expose this time is very ap- 
propos. because it's from another band 
that "cant get no respect" either, the 
Flaming Groovies. The Dictators turn in an 
enthusiastic rendition of "'Slow Death." 
Their escape from a frustrating slow death 
is the same as it always has been: "I get my 
kicks in the social world out side the burger 
and brew." 

My only complaints are that "Borneo Jim- 
my" isn't up to their usual level of ex- 
cellence and side two is one song too short. 
Still, the Dictators rank in the very best of 
the American rock hierarchy and always 
will. So be a good rock and roll citizen, buy 
the record, and get in on the fun or the 
joke's on you. 

ERIC MYERS 




253-9051 



549-1311 



65 University Drive 



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Wednesday. July 19, 1978, 



* Publisher 



CONT FROM PAGE 3 
tensions are visibly lessened, they agreed. 
There's far more chance of a brother-sister 
relationship emerging than of an illicit sex- 
ual arrangement they seemed to say. 

The young men and women get together, 
casually, for pizza runs, for music, for 
studies, for all the pleasant, growing ex- 
periences the adults enjoyed (but can only 
dimly remember), the students added. 

That's not to say there's not a "zoo" 
quality to some aspects of campus life, that 
there isn't far too much drinking and far too 
little scholarship on the part of a segment 
of the student body. 

These parents are really quite fortunate, 
no matter how little they may appreciate 
that fact at this worrisome point. If they're 
sending their 'children " off to the zoo at 
Amherst, at least they're sending them to 
one of the better zoos among American 
colleges and universities. 

Where else, for example, can an 
undergraduate at a state university take ad- 



vantage of the opportunity to 
simultaneously study at such prestigious 
private colleges as Amherst, Smith, Mount 
Holyoke and Hampshire? And for no ap- 
preciable extra cost? 
An eager, capable student can obtain a 
superb education at the University of 
Massachusetts. One Greenfield coed, upon 
graduating from UMass, applied to six 
highly regarded medical schools and was 
accepted by all of them. She chose Har 
vard. 

The University of Massachusetts may not 
be in the same league with some of the 
nx>re noted places of learning in America 
places with names like Stanford and Dart- 
mouth and Princeton, but from this van- 
tage point it seems a terribly nnractive 
place for parents who have imparted to 
their sons and daughters some sense of the 
purpose of a university. 

ArKJ if some lad from California can think 
rt is the third best state university in the 
land, who around here will argue with him? 



ATLANTIC PRESEraTATIONS 




LhqaeK5 5aLaon 

Amh«rtt, Massachusetts 



nmHERST's 
#1 HAPPY HOUR 

MON - FRI 4pm - 7pm 
WED 4pm - Closing 

Come for a drink 

Statj for d in Her 




^july 23, 1978 

fbrence 
quivac 




mezzo 
soprano ^ 

with the festival orchestra under 
the direction of robert gutter 

bernstein: symphony no. 1 

jeremioh " 
tillis: spiritual cycle for 

mezzo-soprano and 

orchestra 

(world premiere) 
schuller: seven studies on 

themes of paul klee 
bernstein; suite from "on the 

waterfront" 
all events will begin at 8 pm 
tickets $7. $6. S5 
umass students S5. S4. S3 
other students, senior citizens S6, $5, S4 
tickets available at the fine arts center 
box office and all ticketron locations 

leonord bernstein festival 

of cmericcr music june 29-july 2a 1978 

the arts center 

Lriv2Tsity of massachus(?tts ./ 

otcmherst ((\ 

den 1^ fi?stival cteclor ^\' 

fobert guttei; nnuac dnzctor 





'july 12,13,15,19,20,21,22 

troulDJe in tohiti 



words and music by 
leonard bernstein 

songs by 
bernstein 

music by bernstein 

lyrics by sondheim. 

comden & green. 

lerner, wilber. 

Schwartz and bernstein 

directed by alan light 

musical direction by )udy brown 

musical staging by robin macrostie 

trouble in tohiti, bernstein s onlv opero. 
IS in seven scenes, and the music is \oii 
based and brightly scored with brisk 
movement and impressive rhythmic grace 
its roots are in musical comedy or even 
better, the amencan musicai theatre 
songs by bernstein wiii feature some of 
bernstein s favorite tunes from on the 
town , wonderful town . candide 
1600pennsylvania avenue and mass 

all events will begin at 8 pm except 
matinees at 3 pm )uly 15 and )uly 22 
tickets S6. umass students S4. 
other students, senior citizens S5 
tickets available at the fine arts center 
box office and all ti'cketron locations 

leorxyd bernstein festi\^ 

of crnerican muse iltk? 29-)iJv 23 1978 

the crts center 

ini Mgrat y of mossochusetts 

at amherst {{lit 

dcr 1^, festive* direcia ^ wA 

robert gutter mLSc director ^ 



■CoNe gjan? 



Notices 




VOL UNTEERS NEEDED 

Volunteers needed tor Thursday night 
cotfee house program to develop relation- 
ships on a one to-one basis with residents 
of Belchertown State School. The program 
will be held in Amherst. Interested college 
students should contact the Boltwood Pro- 
ject at 323 6311, ext. 449 immediately. 
TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION 

Scientiticallyvalidatedtechniquepracticed 
daily for 15 20 minutes. Gives deep rest 
resulting in clearer thinking and improved 
academic performance. Free introductory 
lecture Wednesday July 19, , 7:30 pm in 
Campus Center, Room 178. 
STRA TEGIC GAMES CLUB 

The Strategic Games Club is meeting 
Wednesday, July 19, and Sunday July 23, 
in the Campus Center, Check daily 
schedule for room numbers. All are 
welcome. We play boardgames and 
miniatures. 



Those undergraduates who wish to renew 
their recreation stickers for the Second 
Summer Session rray do so now by paying 
$5.00 at the Bursar's Office in Whitmore. 
This would apply also to those 
undergraduates who are just takino courses 
during the Second Summer Session. The 
receipt from the Bursar's Office should be 
taken to the Boyden Ticket Office (Room 
255) from 8 a.m. to 12, and 12:30 to 3 p.m., 
where you would receive the actual sticker. 
Stickers from the First Summer Session are 
only good to July 1 1 . 

intramural Individual and Team Entrv 
Forms may be filled out at the Intramural 



Office, Room 215 Boyden. Competitive 
leagues will be set up for the following 
sports if there are enough entries. Sports to 
be offered in the Second Summer Session 
with Entry Deadlines, and Tentative Star- 
ting Dates (in parentheses) follow: 
SOFTBALL & VOLLEYBALL 7 19 (7 24) 

TENNIS 7 24(7/26) 

a) Men's Singles 

b) Women's Singles 

c) Men's Doubles 

d) Women's Doubles 

e) Mixed Doubles 

SQUASH, PADDLEBALLEr 
RACQUETBALL 7 25 (7 27) 

CROSSCOUNTRY 8/1 (8 1) 

Anyone interested in participating in an In- 
tramural Sport must have a valid Recrea 
tional Sticker m order to compete Informa- 
tion on obtaining a sticker may be obtained 
by either stopping by the Intramural Office 
(Room 215 Boyden) or callina 
545 2693 '545 3334 

Revised Schedule for Boyden Pool 
(Monday Friday; closed on weekends) 
from July 5 through August 22: 

1:00-2:00 p.m. Lap Swim 

3:X-6:30p.m. Open Swim 
BICYCLES 

UMass police have received complaints 
from handicapped persons concerning peo- 
ple locking their bicycles on ramps for the 
handicapped. 

Police wish to remind students not to lock 
bikes on ramps, especially those leading in- 
to the Graduate Research Center, for such 
action prevents the handicapped from us- 
ing the ramps. 



^--i— ^i,— ^— ^-s.— V— I — I— k— t 



a nnini fwfnQafMof 



t 

C RaM a nnini iwfnQafvtof fof 

Poolside, Patio. Summer home, $10 a 
month plus tax Spirit Haus Refrigerator 
Rentals. 338 College St Open 10 am - 11 
pm^Daily 256 8 433 or 253 5384 

Apt. Availabie nov^ Sublet June-Aug. 
Fall option 2 Bedroom semifurnished for 
$150 on bus route, pool, laundry, near 
stores, etc For more info call Belle 
54^5317 

Two Rooms available t)etween campus 
a nd town 256 6215. Women Only. 

ForSHm ~ 



CLASSIFIEDS 



■ft-ft- t r t n t-n « w « n : 



Large quamitiea of tea avaHable. Ice or 
blocks Spirit Haus Liquors 338 College st. 
Open 10 am 11 pm daily 256 8433 or 
28-5384 



-a 



Ht^Wmnmd 



OnmfTwo day hdfi hutaKkiy homemade 
solar HW t>eater, Sunderland, M/F, no 
phone pis write Collegian, 113 C.C UM, 
Amherst 01003. 



Addraaaars wmad immadiatelyl Work 
at home - no experience necessary - ex- 
cellent pay Write American Service, 8350 
Park Lane, Suite 127, Dallas, Tx 75231. 



mediately' Send self addressed stamped 
envelope: Homeworker, B427 5CA, 
Troy.MT 59935. 

Jobs for qualified applicants Low pay, 
long hours Hard work and frustration!! 
Where? Developing nations. Math, 
Sciences. Engineering. Health etc. Apply: 
Peace Corps Off; Sch. of Ed; Rm. 213. Call 

545 0271 or 546-1042 Eve. 

Part time \M>rk. on campus students 
needed to post advertising materials on the 
bulletin tx>ards of this and /or nearby cam- 
puses. Choose your own hours and 
schedule, work up to 15 hours per week, 
pay based upon amount of work done: Our 
average rep earns 4.65/hour, Write or call 
for booklet , American Passage, 708 War- 
ren Avenue N. Seattle, Wa. 98109, (206) 
282 8111. 

Audio ^^ 

P to n aer FM car stiarao caasatte deck 2 

Jensen co-axial 8 2 Realistic speakers Sold 
car no reasonable offer refused Call Brad 
253 7462 



$200 WEEKLY POSSIBLE MAILING 
CIRCULARSI! Materials supplied Earn Im- 

nnnaaaann w_j a ^l-l^-^>-<^^^^^^■r^-a^^n-(^-tr<r <r^n^^^'r^'l^ 



Stidt in in your ear - we'll pierce them 
free if you buy the studs - Silverscape 
Designs, 264 N. Pleasant St. Amherst 
253 3324 



J/5 Live Entertainment 
J^^ Dancing 

g7NITES a WEEK 






W»«» - T»«urv 

Crystal Wood 

Fri - Sat 

CASH 

Sun 

Williams & Uallan 

Mon - Tues 

CASH 



92 Main St 

The Florence Section of Northampton 

4 Miles West of Smith College, Rte 9 

584-7613 




mci/mn i 



t 



n 



s 



& professional 
consultation in 
selecting the haircut 
best suited for your 
facial structure... 

all at an 
affordable price 

-shamp CO 
-personalized 

cut 
-blow dry 
(long hair 
slightly more) 

( I ues & Wed only 

limited to ournewcustomers) 
Willi thiis c oupon 

65 Univ. Drive 
( Hextto Bell's Piita) 

Call far apot. 549-5S10 



8 



00 



*:«R£DKEN* 



12 CC)llc UicUl 



Wednfasday, July 26, 




Percussionist David Moss will perform his 
"Drumsongs' in the Campus Center 
Auditorium on Wednesday, July 26, at 8 
p m. 

Moss uses an ensemble of gongs, Tibetan 
bells, cymbals, drums, unique sounding 
sculptures, water, wood and voice to 
create his music 



TIT 



Moss has been a faculty member and 
visiting percussionist at the University of 
Wisconsin music clinic. He has taught 
workshops and has t>een artist-in-residence 
at many colleges and universities, and will 
be an artist-in-residence here at UMass for 
the Summer Arts Hostel program during 
the week of July 23. 

The performance will be sponsored by the 



Summer Student Activities Office in 
cooperation with the Arts Extension Ser- 
vice as part of the Celebrate Summer Per- 
formance Series. 

Tickets will be available at the door. Ad- 
mission will be free to Summer Arts Hostel 
participants, 50 cents for Summer 
students, $1 for children and senior 
citizens, and $2 for the general public. 



IVI 



The UMass Summer Film Series will pre- 
sent a program of four short films: "The 
Red Balloon," "Don t,' "Never Give Up" 
and "Katatura. ' on Tuesday, August 1, at 
7.30 and 9;45 p m. in Thompson Hall 104. 
Admission is free. 

ThcATRE 

The Mount Holyoke College Summer 
Theatre presents its second children's play 
of the season, "The Invisible Dragon," 
Wednesday through Saturday, July 26 
through July 29 at 10:30 a.m. in the 
Richard Glenn Gettell Amphitheater. 
Tickets are $1 for all at the door. 



Jason Miller's Pulitzer Prize-winning play 
"That Championship Season" will be 
presented by the Mount Holyoke College 



Summer Theatre nightly from August 1 to 
August 5. The Theatre has recommerxled 
this play for mature audiences only. The 
performances will be at 8:30 p.m. in the 
"Festival Tent" on the Mount Holyoke 
campus. For ticket information and reser- 
vations, call 538-2406. 



Dallas Murphy, Jr.'s "The Terrorists" will 
tje the final production of The Com- 
monwealth Stages "Theatre In The 
Works" season. Performances will be on 
July 27 and 28 at 8 p.m. in the Rand 
Theatre at the Fine Arts Center. 

Murphy is a 1973 graduate of UMass, 
where he earned an MFA in directing. "The 
Terrorists" is a drama about a group of 
weary misfits as they straggle into an 
isolated house in the swamps of southern 
Florida to plan an act of terrorism. 

For information and reservations, call the 
Rand Theatre box office at 545-351 1 . 



The Mount Holyoke College Summer 
Theatre this week presents John van 
Druten's "Bell. Book and Candle," a com- 
edy. The play will run evenings at 8:30 
p.m., in the "Festival Tent' on the Mount 
Holyoke campus, on July 26, 27, 28 and 29. 
For ticket information and reservations, call 
538 2406. 

CONCERTS 

"Rosenshontz" will perform a blen<J'43f 
folk, jazz, and humor on Wednesday, 
August 2 at 8 p.m. in the Campus Center 
Auditorium. The program is sponsored by 
the Summer Activities Program and the 
Arts Extension Service. Tickets may be 
purchased at the door. 

canceUation 

The Mink DeVille concert scheduled for 
3:30 p.m. Thursday, July 27 by the campus 
pond has been cancelled. 




Help for the handicapped 



Wednesday, July 26, 1978| 



$12.8 million expenditure 



■Colle gian 



Renovations to aid disabled 



B>/ MARK LECCESE 

Renovations totalling approximatety 
$12.8 million making all UMass programs 
accessible to the handicapped over the 
next six years have been recommended to 
the UMass-Amherst chancellor. 

Many of these renovations will put the 
University in compliance with the Federal 
Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare regulations implenr»enttng the 
Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Section 
504. 

Section 504, which outlaws deiscrimina- 
tion against handicapped persons, must be 
implemented by any institution that 
receives federal funds. Deadline for com- 
pliance is June 2, 1M0, three years from 
the official anrKJuncement of the regula- 
tions. 

The proposal, submitted in draft form to 
the chancellor by a special task force set up 
to draw up transition guidelines, recom 
mended that $5.2 million be spent over tfie 
next three years to bring UMass up to Sec 
tion 504 guidelines Another $7.6 million 
was recommended that would, according 
to the report, go beyond the requirement 
of the law, but which will make the 
Amherst campus completely accessible to 
all handicanpod individuals." 

' states: "No otherwise 
•opped individual in the 
United States shall, soMy by rtason of 
his handicap, be excluded from the par 
ticipation in. be denied the benefits of, or 
be subjected to descrimination under any 
program or activitv receiving Federal finan- 
cial assistance." 

Assistant to the Chancellor and Task 
Force Chairman Michael A. West said. 

We're better off than most campuses in 
, n'ii les and procedures. Accessibility is 
if. ther problem because we have so many 
programs and buildings " 

This campus spans over 1,400 acres of 
land and has over 425 buildings. 

UMass-Amherst has had an office of Han- 
dicapp>ed Student Affairs, working out of 
the dean of students' office, since 1973. 
Director of the Office of Handicapped Stu- 
dent Affairs Paul Appleby said the office 
supplies "support services for students 
witfi varying fiandicaps." 

Appleby estimates that there are about 50 
severely disabled students on campus, and 
many others who are less severely disabled. 
Appleby's office also deals with temporary 
disabilities 



Section 504 was passed by Congress in 
1973, but the Department of Health, 
Education and Welfare "sat on it " until 
1978, according to West. 

West, the task force, and several graduate 
students in the Landscape Architecture 
Department inspected the majority of 
buildings on campus. 

West said that some program's offices 
may have to be moved to make those pro- 
grams accessible to the handicapped. For 
example, the University Mental Health Ser 
vices are located on the fifth floor of the 
Hills Building, which has no elevator. Ac- 
cording to West, it may cost the University 
less money to move Mental Health's offices 
than to install an elevator in the building. 

Several dormitories are scheduled for 
renovation to make them accessible to the 
handicapped The dorms that would need 
to undergo major renovations to be 
handicapped accessible dorms on campus 
would be Brett, Brooks, Crampton, Field, 
Hamlin. James, Knowlton, Patterson, and 
Prince. These renovations would cost an 
average of $200,000 per dorm 

Also to be renovateti would be some 
buildings in Lincoln Apartments and North 
Village, which are married students' hou- 
sing unit*; ow^^d by UMass 

Renovations would include many 
modifidations of existing structures, such 
as ramps at entrances, widening of door 
ways, and mosifications for the han 

d icapped 
of bathrooms, showers, kitchenettes 
and other dormitory facilities. 

According to West, the special task force 
will also recommend the creation of an ar- 
chitectural barriers board to oversee the im- 
plementation of the new renovations and 
future building on campus. 

Also included in the task force's recom- 
mendations are the installation of a visual 
fire alarm system and audible as well as 
visual exit signs. 

"When the law came into existence, we 
were ahead of most people," said West, 
"but the buses are a big problem." 

UMass has the largest free transportation 
system in the country, and the buses are 
funded partially with federal money The 
UMass bus system will get 26 new buses 
next fall. eight to 10 of which 
will be equipped with wheelchair 

lifts, according to West. 




Stairs present one of the mBjor barriers to handi- 
capped people around campus, (photo by Laura Kenney) 



Pigeon poison mystery solved 



By MARK LECCESE 

When things get slow around here 
in the summer, they really get slow. 
And when the dog days of July hit, 
you gratefully foMow up any story 
that comes across your desk. 

That is how I came to discover the 
true story behind the alleged pigeon 
poisonings 

A few people had either called or 
visited the Collegian office to inform 
us of a strange campus 
phenomenon: pigeons had been 
seen around the campus, flying crazi- 
ly and writhing and vomiting on the 
ground. Some had also seen the 
pigeons dead. 

And that's not all: one woman said 
she had tried to nurse a pigeon that 
seemed to be in its death throes back 
to health by giving it water and leav- 
ing It under a tree. When she 

returned 
the next morning, the pigeon was 
gone. 

Nasty rumors began to circulate; 
people from the physical plant were 
feeding the pigeons poison corn, let 
ting them die an obviously painful 
death, and then carting their little 
corpses away in the dead of night. 

Several phone calls turned up 
nothing definite, and the mystery 
became deeper. Who would be do- 
ing this to the pigeons^ 

A phone call was made to Donald 
A, Robinson, director of the Univer 
sity Department of Environmental 
Health and Safety Were the pigeons 
perhaps the carriers of some dread 
disease that his department was 
valiently trying to control? 

But he knew nothing of the 
pigeons. . He promised to check 
around, and call me if anything 
turned up. 



I hung up the phone, feeling de- 
jected. Would I never get to the bot- 
tom of this? 

In less time than it takes for a 



pigeon to fly across campus, the 
phone rang. It was Robinson. 
"I've found out who's killing the 
pigeons. " he said. It seems there 



Birds had been seen on campus 
acting drunl<. It was soon discovered 
that an avacide was being used 
to scare them away... 




have been problems with the pigeons 
on the roof of the Goessman 
Building, an old, dibCii.^uished- 
looking building across from the 
Campus Center. The problems had 
to do with, well, pigeon "excre- 
tions." 

The man in charge of dealing with 
these pigeons was Kenton H. Bil 
lings, head of the Buildings and 
Grounds Department of the Physical 
Plant. I called him. 

"No, we're not poisoning any 
pigeons," he said testily. 

Well, but, what about all those 
sickly-looking pigeons? 

"We're not using poison," he ex- 
plained, "we're using an avacide." 

What this avacide does, he ex 
plained 
to me, is to go to work on the 
pigeon's central nervous system, 
making the bird, as he described it, 
"act a little drunk." 

"It's a flock alarming device," he 
said. The Physical Plant has been us- 
ing this avacide. by feeding the 
pigeons treated com, to keep the 
area round Goesman clean "for a 
couple of years, on and off," Billings 
said. 

I heaved a sigh of relief. So this 
avacide doesn't kill the pigeons? 

"No, I don't believe so." 

They just flap around like crazy, and 
then, after 45 minutes or so, fly 
away? 

"Unless we catch them first." 

And if you catch them, do you guys 
just take them someplace else and let 
them go' 

"Nope." 

Oh Uh, do you, umm. get rid of 
them? 

"Yup. Would vou like to walk 
through that mess around 
Goessman?" 



2 Colle gian, 



I Wednesday, Juty 26. 1978 



The Longest Walk: symbolic of injustice 



Native Americans 
continue to face 

threats to their land and their rights. 



By LEE BURNETT 

More than 300 Native American 
marchers have completed "The 
Longest Walk. " a dramatisation of 
the many forced Indian Long Walks 
of history. This march began on Feb. 
1 1 . in Sacramento, Ca . , and ended in 
Washington, D.C. on July 11, the 
traditional focus of Indian activism. 

Long Walks are symbolic of in- 
justice. In the 19th century they were 
often provoked by imminent 
massacre by the US. Cavalry. Today 
they are provoked by other threats 
According to the Native American 
Soiidantv Committee: 

-The living conditions on reserva- 
tions which have produced an infant 
mortality rate three times the national 
average, a tuberculosis rate eiaht 



times the national average, and a 
suicide rate among teens that is 10 
times the national average. 

•Particular examples of FBI har- 
rassment For instance, m February 
of 1976 the body of a woman was 
discovered in Wanblee, South 
Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian 
Reservation The FBI had an autopsy 
performed, declaring death by ex- 
posure. They cut off her hands for 
identfication purposes, and buried 
her in an unmarked grave without 
notification of next of kin. After it 
was released that it was Anna Mae 
Aquash, long time American Indian 
Movement activist, her family re- 
quested another autopsy which 
showed she was shot at close range 
in the back of the head The FBI was 
ordered but did not investigate fur- 
ther. 




Genocide. A 1976 report from the 
General Accounting Office on Indian 
Health Service practices shows that 
the Indian Health Services performed 
or contracted for 3,406 illegal non- 
theraputic permanent sterilizations 
on Native American women during 
FY 1973-76 Mane Sanchez, a Nor- 
thern Cheyenne, says, "First of all 
they use our own people. They brain- 
wash our own people and call them 
Community Health Workers. They 
come to our houses and tell us how 
we could benefit from sterilization, 
how there would be money left over, 
and they offer us material things and 
promise us a better way of life But i 
don t see it that way. A poor woman 
rernains poor, sterilized or not." 

Cultural genocide. Historically 
ther'j has been no teaching of 
Americn lr>dian history in the Bureau 
of Indian Affairs schools A more 
particular example is the case of 
Madonna Gilbert who was forced to 
wash a set of stairs with a toothbrush 
because she spoke in her native 
Lakota in class. 

Bills in Congress that attack Indian 
Sovereignty. One result of the Indian 
wars with the US. Government was 
treaties which clearly define the 
boundaries of Indian Nations. They 
guarantee Indian nations a land base 
on which to maintain their people S 
-ulture and government. 
Presently there are more than nine 
bills before the 95th Congress that 
threaten Indian sovereignty. The 
most comprehensive bill is House 
Resolution 9054. authored by a 
Republican representative from 
/Washington. This bill seeks to ignore 
all treaty rights relating 'o fishing, 
hunting, and water use, ts well as 
assimilating Indians into citizenship. 
Ernest Peters, a spokesperson for the 




Longest Walk, has asked the Con- 
gressman. "Why don t you try to 
make the pdople of Japan citizens of 
the United States, or the people of 
Germany, or Canada^" 

Why are these attacks happening 
now? One reason perhaps is the re- 
maining reservation land has been 
"rediscovered" because it contains 
uranium, and other natural resources 
such as gas, coal, water, fish and 
timber. In fact according to the 
United Nations Office of Interna- 
tional Indian Treatyt council, 30 per- 
cent of the oil 'serves. X percent of 
the low-sulpher coal and 90 percent 
of the uranium de'posits lie on Indian 
land. US. multinationals together 
with the Federal government are 
pressunng Indtan people to sell or 
leave their land. 

James Jordan of Amherst, who 
participated in the walk said, "It (The 
Longest Walk) is an effort to bring 
national attention to these issues." 



associate provost 

Esther Terry, an associate professor m the 
Afro-American Studies Program at the 
University of Massachusetts Amherst, has 
been appointed assiciate provost. She will 
take office as of August 1 . 

Terry received her B.A. degree from Ben- 
nett College in Greensboro, N.C., her M.A. 
from the University of North Carolina in 
Chapel Hill, and her Ph.D. m English from 
UMass. She has been at UMass for 10 
years, is married, and has a son. 

Among her duties will be to oversee the 
University's affirnDative action program. 

Assistant UIVI dean 
dies of heart attaclc 



Charles W Turner, assistant dean of the 
College of Food and Natural Resources, 
died last week after a heart attack. He was 
60. 



Turner, of 127 Huntington Road in 
Hadley, had been an assistant dean since 
1968 He received degrees from the Univer- 
sity of Rhode Island and the University of 
North Carolina. 

During World War II, Turner was a lieute- 
nant commander in \h» U.S. Navy, and 
was stationed in the Pacific. 

After the war, he becanne director of the 
Worcester County Extension Sen/Ice until 
1960. He was an agricultural consultant for 
the Agency of International Developnnent 
in Malawi, Africa, from 1963 to 1965. 

Turner was ounea in the Pine Grove 
Cerr>etery in Boylston. Mass. 



Officials become 
commission members 

Two UMass- Amherst officials were sworn 
in as members of Governor Michael S. 
Dukakis' Postsecondary Education Com- 



mission. 

The officials are George Beatty, Jr., 
UMass budget director, and Richard J. 
Talbot, director of libraries. 

The commission received federal grants 
for studies of all public and private 
postsecondary educational institutions and 
their resources and advises the governor 
and the secretary of education on the plan- 
ning necessary to improve and expand their 
abilities to serve the state. 

Beatty is the chairman of the Association 
for Institutional Research's International 
Exchange Committee. He has also 

published 
extensively on institutional research and 
is the co-founder of both the Northeast and 
the North Carolina Associations for Institu- 
tional Research. 

Talbot has served as the president of the 
Massachusetts Conference of Chief 
Librarians of Public Higher Educational In- 
stitutions. 

The commission will meet at least four 
times each year. Members serve without 
salary, but are reimbursed for any expenses 
incurred during their time spent as commis- 
sion members. 



Old Chapel remains 
closed for repairs 

The Old Chap>el, one of the campus's 
oldest buildings, remains closed for roof 
repairs after two months, although officials 
first estimated that repairs would only take 
a week. 

"I'm a little surprised," said Donald Robin- 
son, head of the Department of En- 
vironmental Health and Safety, "the extent 
of the repairs was a little more than we an- 
ticipated." 

The building was closed on June 12, after 
officials were told by Physical Plant 
employees that there were problems with 
the roof trusses, according to Robinson. 

"There was deteriorating of wooden roof 
trusses through water seepage over an ex- 
tended period of time," Robinson said 
when he closed the building. 

A Northampton firm, Aquato and Cerruti, 
are doing repairs. 

"The building was first closed on inspec- 
tion done on a visual basis. The damage is 
more extensive than they originally 
thought," Robinson said last week. 

- MARK LECCESE 



MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 




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LAURA M 


KENNEY 


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MARK A 


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LAMKIN 



SUBSCRIPTIONS 
On r^n^HJS and ofl canrpu* 



t2 SO Summar 



VIrt'' (Itriiyiiy 1(1 iJ'iiv>"Mlv (.ampus and Arrhpfsi dtfd sanif 
()iisin».M "Ihv oI pubiicaiiof AH f<ih«.t ateas o» Vassachusetis 
'l»>liv»My 'f/Mowinq day OutsiOe ol Masjachusett* allow 2 or 3 rlavs 
,(,.. ^Pf, S'T'I clitH-k O' mdrpy oriie' lo thf MMMChmatt* Su(n 
m«r Collegian Boom 113 CafTipus C^nn-f Un.vm.iv o' 
Vasvit^Nselts Amhirrst Massac hiiietts 01003 PixasK allow 1 
Ai.i.k 1(11 (lelivety ;o siaM 

Thp otiKc ol the MaMBchuMtts Sunwnar CoHagi a n is located 
I- Rdoni ' 13 o» ">H Wmiihv I 'n.oir Campus C«"t<*' on ihf Univc 
Mty i,\ Mrts'.Hi hiis»-'f. 1 ,i"i\,\is ' (.rone MS 3500 

The MnssachuftCtis Summar CoNagtan •% an 4)"'<1 '"' •"»'' 
iix) uralf th»- auii'Otily i)' an act cjl Coiiyrns* Y*"' "^ '879dndas 
aniHortPd June 1 1 1943 i 

S''i ' ■ I .IS.- [ioM,i()c0 p.iici I'i Arnhet^i Masssac'Hisflts 01003 
Ttii- Maaaachuaam Summer CoHagian puljiitihes every Wednes 

.|,i. M.i,?' "i7R tiiUMiut Aiiqu'.! Ifi 197R.IM icisiv« 




1978 - 79 
ACADEMIC CALENDARS 

at A.J. Hastings 
ne^vsdealer and stationer 

Amherst 



li 



J! 



iCoUfgl^QS 



Construction to resume soon 



Residents vote to keep mall 



/»»/' 'HP A KF\NEy 

'ADLEY - .Driving east or> Rr«j. 9, past 
fa n houses, quaint shops, fr jit «.?3-ids and 
th Mountain harms Mail, ti.ere s.jnds a 
hoiking, partially finished skeleton of con- 
struction material, set cgaiiist a 
bvrkground o* farmland and m- -r.ta'n 
riinge. 

The scert is ine site of th« H. sntre 
Mall, which ^as begun lart sprirg but 
w^lOse construction was halttxj Jun-) 19 as 
a result of protests by the C tizens tor the 
Preservation of Hadley. The C'oup took the 
mall developers to court, charging tnat 
construction was begun before a 20-day 
waiting period required by a new town 
bylaw was up. 

Last Wednesday over 600 voters and 
others interested in the mall controversy 
turned out to a special town meeting here, 
held to repeal the town's site plan approval 
bylaw, which would therefore allow con- 
struction to resume if the court injunction 
were lifted. The residents voted 499 to 119 
to repeal the nylaw, which was put into ef- 
fect just last spring at the annual town 
meeting. 

The bylaw requires that developers of 
large-scale projects submit their proposals 
to the town planning t>oard for approval 
before beginning construction Pyramid 
Company, the Hampshire Mall developers, 
had received the board's approval and had 
gonen a perm«t in April to start building. 
But there was .• question as to whether the 
company had ooserved the 20-day require- 
nr>ent. 

The Pyramid Company, which has built 27 
other malls, late last week sought a lift to 
the court injunction. Officials expect the 
court to order a lift sometin>e this week so 
that construction can resume immediately. 
A Nov 1 opening is planned; if the deadline 
is r>ot met, several "anchor" stores will 
most likely lose money because they have 
ordered merchandise which is expected to 
sell for Christmas. 




Drainage pipes stand unused outsiOe tne site of ttie 
Hampshire Mai. which may resume construction 
soon, (photo by Laura Kenney) 



Much debate over the mall has arisen 
among town residents. Many say they feel 
that the $5 million, 70-store project will hurt 
the community, while others see it as a 
source of tax revenue. 

One resident, the mother of young 
children, said she was opposed to tf>4B mall 
because "it will attract drugs; kids from out 
of town will hang around there." She said 
she did not want her children to be exposed 



NORML off ice opens 



By LEE BURNETT 

The National Organization for the 
Reform of Marijuana Laws has 

opened 
an office in Amherst as part of an 
effort to make Massachusetts the 
twelfth state to decriminalize the 
possession of marijuana. 

Richard Evans, state co-ordinator 
said, "It's not a life and death issue 
but it is directly related to the pream- 
ble of the Constitution. There is 
nothing more precious in my view 
than liberty. To deny someone the 
liberty to smoke a joint is 
outrageous." While there is "no 
organized opposition we have to 
overcome fears, prejudices and 
myths we have all been victinrts of for 
the last 40 years and still characterize 
the laws. " 

Currently for possession of any 
amount of marijuana the 
Massachusetts penalty is zero to six 



months and /or SbUU. NURML aims 
to pass a law to reduce possession of 
an ounce or less to a maximum fine 
of $100. 

The strategy is to file a bill in 
December, hire a lobbyist, marshall a 
letter-writing campaign and gather 
media support. William Muller, ex 
ecutive director of NORML in 
Massachusetts, said, "A non binding 
referendum is a possibility but we 
don't have a strong enough organiza- 
tion to be successful." 

"Decriminalization is not to be con- 
fused with legalization," Muller 
observed. "What it means is that of- 
fenders wouldn't be treated as 
criminals. And with legalization 
you'd be creating another tobacco 
industry." 

Based on a 13 percent sample of the 
state done by the Department of Pro- 
bation and Parole, 5,000 people each 
year are arrested for possession in 
Massachusetts. Ninety percent are 
arrested for one ounce or less. 



to such problems in Hadley Other mall op- 
ponents expressed concern for traffic 
tangles in town. 

Hut proponents of the mall greatly out 
numbered opponents at last week's 
meeting. Town resident Richard Chmura 
said, "They (mall opponents) say we're 
spoiling our community. We're not; this 
(the mall construction) is for the good of 
the town - it will keep taxation iown." The 
town IS expected to receive $200,000 per 
year in taxes from the enterprise. "It's a lot 
better than putting up apartments," said 
Chmura, who received loud applause. 

Attendance at the meeting broke town 
records, despite the sweltering heat. 
Debate over the mall issue that niqht was 



much briefer and less heated than at 
previous meetings; many blanf>ed the 
weather for the lack of argument One 
woman was overheard as saying, "It's just 
too hot let's vote and get out of here!" 

Among the anchor stores for the mall are 
Steiger's, a Springfield based department 
store, J.C. Penney, another departnr>ent 
store, and K-Mart, a discount store. 



Dozens of construction workers have 
been laid off as a result of the 4- week long 
work stoppage, and now only security 
guards work at the site, protecting any 
material in and around the one-third built 
structure. 



Hadley rejects proposal 
to join bus authority 



Last week's Hadley Town Meeting, in ad- 
dition to voting to repeal the site-plan ap- 
proval bylaw, rejected a proposal to join the 
Pioneer Valley Transit Authonty. 

Hadley resident Tim Brennan, of the 
Lower Pioneer Valley Regionaf Planning 
Commission, said the town could join the 
PVTA for between $3,000 and $3,700, 
which would fund Western Mass. Bus 
Lines. The company operates a bus 
through Hadley on its Amherst- 
Nortf>amnton run. 

Brennan said the service would increase 
from eight to 13 trips per day if the town 



were to join the bus authority. "We hope to 
divert as many drivers as possible out of' 
cars and into mass transit," he said. "We 
have to begin now thinking about the 
energy crisis, because it's not far in the 
future." 

Officials from the PVTA met three times 
with town selectmen to promote the bus 
service. After the third meeting, the select- 
men decided that the bus issue should be 
brought up at a Town Meeting. 

The proposal was defeated by a vote of 
364 to 213. 

-LAURA KENNEY 



REqisTER For MiliTARy ScIence 



ANd EARN A COMIVIISSION 



In ThE U.S. Army; 



iDcpARTMENT of MiliTARy ScIeNCC 



>4>-2J21i 



\bur money 
talks LOUDEST in 
a lowcosf Want Ad 

No maltpr iftf' r ■ ■ "' , 3e: "le yory ">.■ $; 

Irotn youf money Dy s^opp "g fie Wa-'t Ads Products 
•"ercMandiSe services y.iu ii tnrt ;i an Ar s ,oj can dn 
a'l you' Sfii.>pU'ng fro"' I'e conn.n.encf :.' y , .,■ A • .M>, 
cfiai' So S-T-R-E-T-C-M your dollart by crieckinf lh« 
Want adt loday* 

COLLEGIAN 
CLASSIFieOS 
G£T RfSUirS' 



113 CAMPUS CfNTER 



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WastheBakke 
decision colorblind? 

For every Allan Bakke, there are 20 

whites excluded simply because 
there is no room. 



vveanesday, July 26. 1978 



^ 



By JOEL DREY FUSS 

Joel Drey fuss, who is completing a book 
on the Bakke case to be published by Her 
court. Brace. Jovanovich, worked as a 
staff reporter for the Washington Post and 
the New York Post. He is a member of 
PNS's task force of scho^rs and journalists 
on America s urban crisis. 

(Pacific News Service) The case that was 
biNed as the greatest confrontation be- 
tween the nghts of whites and minorities in 
2S years flopped as a landmark decision 
bacause ironicallv. it failed to address some 
crucial issues that have nothing at all to do 
with race. 

The desire of a 38-year-old white 
aerospace engineer to make a mid-career 
switch into medicirte was touted as a 
serious test of the nght of whites to be free 
from discrimination, but aH it did was 
obscure the fact that there is no end in 
sight to white supremacy in Anrtenca. 

The unfortunate consequence of the US. 
Supreme Court s decision ordering Allan 
Bakke admined to the medical school of 
the University of California at Davis is the 
reinforcement of the fear among many 
whites that affirmative action is cutting into 
their opportunities for advancement. The 
truth IS that for every Allan Bakke viewed 
as a victim of special admissions, there are 
20 other whites who are excluded from 
medical schools simply because there is not 
enough room for applicants of any color. 

In virtually every desirable job category to- 
day, the overwhelming majority of job- 
holders are white and in areas where these 
positions have decision making powers, the 
job holder is extremely likely to be both 
white and male. In the forseeable future, 
being born white and male m America will 
continue to be the insurance for acquiring 
the rewards of the middle-class existence. 

In fact, if there were no minorities at all in 
the United States, what to do with an ex- 
ploding population of ymmg, educated 
whites would still be a serious national 
crisis that few politicians and social scien 
lists have chosen to address Most 
minonties are so far from competing with 
whites for available opportunities that they 
are hardly a factor in the distribution of 
limited opportunities. 

All the talk about "quotas." "affirmative 
action" and the "mentocracy" has created 
a misleading image of the impact of 
minorities on the professional job market. 
In medical schools, 92 of every 100 
students are white. Ninety-five of every 100 
law students in the country are white 

In 1976, more than 42,000 persons applied 
for 15,700 place m medical schools Less 
than 1,300 of those accepted were from 
minority groups. Even if no minorities were 
accepted there would still be 26,000 whites, 
most of them qualified to become doctors, 
who would have their life-long dreams cut 
short by the sheer weight of competition 
from other whites. 

At the University of California's Boalt Hall 
Law School, for example, 3,549 persons 
applied for 293 places in the first-year class 
of 1976. Again, if there were no minorities 
at all in the applicant pool, more than 3,000 
well-qualified candidates would have been 
turned away. 

The image of unfair advantage for 
minorities has been reinforced by the pro- 
jection of the crucial issue in Bakke as a 
confrontation of blacks and whites over the 
right to acquire graduate degrees But m 
nine cases out of 10, both competitors in 
the tug of war are likely to be white. The 
most profound change that has taken place 
in the battle for places in graduate and pro 
fessional schools involves sex, not race. In 
1959, only 6 percent of first-year medical 
students were women. In 1976, they con- 
stituted nearly a quarter of the entering 
class. 

The cause for all this jostling is the in- 
famous post World War II baby boom. The 
U.S. Census Bureau estimates that there 
are 58 million people in the "prime" 25 to 44 
age category. By 1990 the population of 
this age group will be 60.5 million. 
"Competition will be intense and disap- 
pointment widespread," said Richard B. 
Freeman, d professor of economics at Har 
vard University. "This disappointment will 
be deepened by the fact tfiat. on the 
average, these workers will be better 
educated than many of their superiors." 



Already , there areestimates that as many as 
one million college graduates are 
unemployed or underemployed in the 
United Stat«. Prospects that the economy 
will be able to absorb this flood of highty 
educated and qualified individuals seams 
gloomy at this time. 

For the last five years an intense debate 
has been raging over the degree of pro- 
gress blacks have made since the civil 
rights era of the 1960b. Neo-conservatives 
have argued that substantial progress has 
been made and that there is little need for 
preferential programs. Civil rights leaders 
contend that there has been little forward 
movement and that calls for "benign 
neglect" are a r>ew form of racism As is 
often the case in such debates, there is 

TURN TO PAGE 10 



WEDNESDAY 

MiCHELOB RlfiHT 

Frt« Mttiiehits 

12 01. ^^« 



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• 182 King Street, Northampton 586-4020 Official State Inspection Station 
New Store Hours 7:30-5:30 Monday-Friday, Thursday 'til 8 p.m. Saturday 'til 5. 



Wednesday, Juiy26. 1 978, 



.Colle gian b 



corner aelu..-., , 
Stop & Stiop 



PotaloSalad 

39f 



Regular 
or Oil and Vmeqar 



Stop & Shop Baked Ham r »3.79 
Turkey Breast *-^%^;;;>i;-s^-- »3 79, 
Stop & Shop Ham Salad . - M 99 
Stop & Shop Tuna Salad . -.: '1 .99 
Rice Pudding <ir^.: ^ 

Stop & Shop Meat Balls ->. '2 69 




I 
I 
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|§ stop & Shop 

i Bacon 




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SoaciaK on good 
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^^ Varieties 

tg ^.,^odM.><^ iijly"?4 Sal J.J, ?9 



Stop & Shop i:i- 
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Beef Franks 1 49 

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Variety Pak ^•... >1 79 

Mortadella ..j.ri. 99* 

Polish Style Sausage \ '1.79' 



seafood ^ >.• besi ^^es^ A frozen i 

StopaShopRlletsof 

Pollock gor 






»' 



Fresh Steaming Clams 79- 

Boston Lite Cod Fillets ;,^- '1 .39 

^ Snow Crab Claws '•rom '299. 

frozen foods Money »««ogapec«l» 

Regular or Pink 

Lemonade 

stop&^iPo/CIAf 

Shop .^^c^-s^y^p 

Stop & Shoe Of anae Juice V 89* 
Cottee ^ightenef .l^TS. 39* 
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Broccoli Speari . ii^ 39* 

Elites Cheese Pizza . -:. M 59 
Aunt Jemima Waffles ..."-i' 59' 

Half Gal. Ice Cream .^2iS TS^ i . 1 9 
Frozen Yogurt ""JiMT. 2'ii'1 
Strawberries V'.*::.. 39* 

Whipped Topping : ;..',iL 49* 
CerrnlyCitaisBars .^i^*S. M.09 

Choclit Covers • M •; . '119 



8 delicious ways^to feed 
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Your 
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Sara Lee Dessert Cakes 



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Cheese 



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( n«r>c I vn \ 



Individuarty Wrapped 
White Of Yellow- 12oz pkg 

Alouette Cheese r.T. vr: 
Blue Bonnet Margarine 

■ »■♦ OwxxJ n* O-^ ».*«^ .1)1(1 



99 



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Swiss Cheese Slices r.i'ii 99' 

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Yogurt 

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Beef Chuck Steak 

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Fresh Ducklings 

U.S. Grade "A" 4 to 6lbs. ^^^ 

Hams 

Rump Portion-Water Added 

Pofk Shoulder 

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Calves liver 

Lorenz Brand - Frozen 




Picnic 



Skinned & 
Deveined 




Fruit Flavored Drinks 



;'59* 
69* 

69' 



^tA?^oVN 



Fresh Pizza 

stop & Shop - Cheese 
18oz. size 



Whole Kernel Com j^ &^»1 
Crushed Tomatoes - - 2'5i»1 

LaChoy 

Bean 
'prouts 

Chow Mem Noodles -.3 *^*1 
LaChoy Soy Sauce ^^ 

B&M California Pea 

Baked 
Beans 

Heinz Relish .^•' r.,„ 39' 
Stop & Shop Mustard .■29' 

*=/^ Chef Boy-ar- dee 

'Ravioli 

31 




SwgTwn, and M<M!r.dlR> 
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Deviled Ham 
Chicken Spread - 



'so>.#v«cjr* 



■:. 59* 
59' 




38 
ounce 
bottle 



produce 

Choice prorluce 



DaKery Baked goods from our own ovens 

Stop & Shop Top Slice 

FrankSuit 
Rolls 4»" I 

Daisy Donuts ^^,'rs^^^, 59' 
Sponge Layer Cake '^i^ 69* 
Apple Pie u^tS^ 99" 

Buttercrest Bread "^'.^ 2iii*1 

Stop & Shop 




^&^a Jumbo #%$^ 

Dorado. Wickson. Nubiana^^r 4^P 



El Dorado, Wickson, 
LaRoda Late Santa Rosa and Simka 



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The finest 
and most 
literate 
minds 
speak 



CRISIS AND 

CONSCIOUSNESS 

EDITED BY RALPH M FARIS 



Crisis and Consctousnew 

ed Ralph M Farts 

B. R Grur>er Publishing Co. 

Amsterdam 207 pp. 

Reviewed bv KEN SHAIN 

This comprehensive volume is perhaps the 
smgte most inspiring example of literature 
t" pass across my desk vet this summer 
Prr'aasor Fans has managed to compile 
and edit a broad and exciting array of 
material representing the finest and most 
itarate minds in the world today, writing on 
topics as diverse as crisis and decay, mass 
ur>employment. educational downturn and 
the disorientation of intellectuals Released 
as Volume 20 m Or David H DeGrood s 
Pht/osophtcBl Currents series. CHais and 
Conaciouanaaa is a rr.ust for any serious 
student of society's bookshelf. 

Focusing in on some of today s most 
festering problems, Prof Fans is not con- 
tent to leave the discussion in a purely 
theoretical realm Though the papers 




monopoly capital's (and increasingiy 
through political sabotage, state-monopoly 
capitalism s) inability to control its own 
development Functioning to facilitate 
capital growth and stability, mass 
unemployment as an economic modus 
operandi holds masses of people - entire ur- 
ban communities in economic, social and 
cultural bondage Though we see much be 
ing written on this timely topic by contem- 
porary sociologists and self-styled 
theorists, few get to the root of this rotting 
tree quite the way Munford does 
The keynote paper by Professor Faris is a 
survey of some of the more recent treruls m 
the social sciences entitled "Reflecfons of 
Crisis " It IS Fans' contentionch tell us 
what life in our society is like as much as it 
tells us what life in our society does to 
those who can only think about it. Signifi 
cant only to the extent to which these 
theories portray the confusion and disorien 
tation of their makers in this current stage 
of decay, these "reflections of crisis" 
nonetheless constitute sociological theory 
m the mam Simply, social theory in our 



Books 



presented in the volume deal with the 
philosophical and political dynamics of the 
historical process of social development in 
a critical manr>er, the thrust here goes 
b€fvond mere cntique to actually com- 
plementing concrete activity currently be 
mg undeaaken in the areas discussed 
Talking must lead to doing and Prof Fans 
has quite self consciously reali/ed the im 
plications of this dynamic by organizing a 
volume of essays that meets our needs as 
well as satisfies our curiosity 

Dr David H DeGrood opens the discus 
sion with a probing and incisive 
philosophical inquiry into the history of 
American economic monopolization ap 
propnately titled Cnsis and Lmpire " 
Through careful and painstaking research 
presented discriminasntely and critically 
within a materially based framework, 
DeGrood develops the position that im 
penalism is a demonstration of class society 
manifested internationally as an attempt by 
capital to stabiliie itself by whatever means 
necessary. Drawing from the wealth of 
concrete evidence accumulated by 
historians on the period of American 
economic growth and expansion during the 
turn of the last century, the mild-mannered 
Clark Kent lookalike from the University of 
Bridgeport constructs an argument that 
literally obliterates the Brzezinskian "Three- 
Age argument" of modern day 
technotronic benevolent world capitalism 
through a mere discussion of the quan 
titative development of capitalism in its ear 
ly industrial phase. At once, the qualitative 
similarities with the later, present phase are 
recognizable and disprove the existence of 
a rehabilitated value-free imperialism. Im- 
perialism was and still is the extension of 
capital in the international sphere, not a 
social phenomerva as argued by the na- 
tion's leading ideologians. The difference, 
argues DeGrood lies not in the superficial 
characteristics of the superstructure but in 
the actual resolution of crisis at the founda- 
tion of the empire. 

Clarence J Munford writes on "Mass 
Unempoyment's Real Function," using a ti- 
tle alone that is sure to enrage the critical 
theorists among us for both its use of the 
term "real" and its overall concern for the 
masses Here, mass unemployment is seen 
not as a social condition leading to a leisure 
society nor as a social problem to be 
remedied through the application of hastily 
conceived social programs based upon 
equally ill conceived social theories, but as 
a protracted condition arising out of 



age of crisis and decay tells us mo'e about 
the consciousness of the intellectuals that 
produced them than it tells us about the 
society we live in, and alhough great 
pretenses have been made to glorify and 
pedestalate social theory as a force m itself. 
Fans shows how even the most advanced 
of the new wave of critical social theorists 
actually trail behind the masses. 

Dale Riepe, to whom the world owes a 
great deal for his contributions m the field 
of "historico-dynamics," contributes a 
paper entitled "Contemporary Western 
Subjectivism n the Philosophy of 
Science," in an attempt to demystify both 
the human creative process and the social 
historical process. Noted for his research 
on lr>dian and eastern philosophy. Prof. 
Riepe examines various strains of western 
subjectivism and idealism in their attempt 
to invent a philosophy of science. 
Philosophies are not invented but develop 
within the continuum of history Furthering 
the work of Bernal and Haldane Riepe 
defends both saence and humanity from 
charges of positivism by the falsifiers and 
misrepresenters of the historical process 

Other articles include Paul Feltham on 
"Education and the Age of Decay," 
William A. Pelz on "Crisis and the 
Ideological Defense," as well as hard-to- 
find translations of papers and essays by 
Georg Lukacs. Frederick Engels and An 
tonio Veduta Veduta, a shadowy figure 
cloaked in mystery, addresses his 
manuscript on "Bourgeois Catastrophe and 
International Terrorism," as Zurich, 
Switzerland and although the paper does 
not discuss the fashionable topic of 
ultraleft ultraright collaboration on the 
Western European continent today, it does 
draw some interesting parallels between 
the current period of terrorisic activity and 
the terrorism of the pre -World War II period 
of decay. 

Crisis and Consciousr>e6s stands out as 
a successful attempt by Prof Faris to 

"develop an anthology which will assist the 
reader in constructing a sharper, more in- 
tegrated perspective on the sweeping 

range 
of "calamitous" events currently reshaping 
consciousness and Praxis in the world to 
day." 

Inquiries and orders on this independently 
produced volume can be addressed to 
Humanities Press inc., 171 First Avenue, 
Atlantic Highlands. New Jersey 07716 A 
catalog of other related releases will be sent 
free upon request. 



Wednesday, July 26, ""gyt 



Deerfield Drive- In Iheatrc 

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ADULT ENTERTAINMENl 

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Wndnesdav. July 26 1978, 




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#1 HflPPY HOUR 

MON - FRI 4pm - 7pm 
WED 4pm - Closing 

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Williams & Uallan 

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2 MILES FROM NORTHAMPTON OR AMHERST 



CASH AND CARRY 

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OR 

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NoricES 



EXERCISE SCIENCE 

Have your body fat and fitness level 
assessed for free by the exercise science 
department. For tfiose 18-35 years old, it 
will take only 15 minutes of your time. Call 
545-1337 or come to room OA Boyden 
(across f'om the weight room) from 9 a.m. 
to 1 p.m. 
LEGAL SERVICES 

Legal Services is presently conducting a 
search for an attorney. The search commit- 



tee would like to have another woman par- 
ticipate in the process. 
Any interested wonr>en are asked to con- 
tact Jeanne Lavin at CC992, 545-1997 
PLACEMENT SERVICE 

The Placement in Hampshire House will 
be closed all day Wed., July 26. 
£057- 

Glasses in brown case, on 7/24, near 
Page Laboratory or Post Office. Call 
545-0900 



CLASSIFIEDS 



Auto for Sah 



1966 Ford Falcon totally functional but 
must sell. BO. Call 256 8153 or 545 2129 

PorRBnt 

Rent a mini refrigerator for summer. 

Poolside, Patio, Summer home. $10 a 
month plus tax. Spirit Haus Refrigerator 
Rentals. 338 Colleqe St Open 10 am - 11 
p m Daily 256 8 433 or 25 3-5384 

Apt. Available now! Sublet June-Aug, 
Fall option. 2 Bedroom semifurnished for 
$150 on bus route, pool, laundry, near 
stores, etc. For more info call Belle 
549-5317 

ForSale 

Large qua nth ia a of ice availat>le. ice or 

blocks. Spirit Haus Liquors 338 College st. 
Open 10 am - 11 pm. daily 256-8433 or 
253 5384. 

ToSubht 

House vwttti Idtchan facility 19 Philips St. 
See Mike located near BKO Frat. $75 per 

month 



Addressers wanted immediately! Work 
at home - no experience necessary - ex- 
cellent pay. Write American Service, 8350 
Park Lane, Suite 127, Dallas, Tx 75231 . 
Nead some extra money? Volunteers 
wanted for study of taste and eating p>at- 
terns. Must be female between the ages of i 
18 and 30. Three dollars for 45 minute ses- 
sion Call Randy Frost, Smith College, 584 
2700<ext 757) or 586-3205. 

Audh 

Pi )neer FM car stareo casaetta deck 2 

Jt "sen coaxial & 2 Realistic speakers Sold, 
car no reasonable offer refused Call Brad^ 
2^7462. 

PttsonBis 



Help WantBd 



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free if you buy the studs - Silverscape] 
Designs, 264 N. Pleasant St. Amherst' 
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day July 21. Contact Richard Barclay 227 
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Inspiring affection 
in Belchertown 



Lsopold's 

By DON LESSER 

To most people, Belchertown is a sign on 
the Mass. Pike, an unfortunately nan>ad 
village, no doubt full of rude people and in- 
dustrial sniokestacks. Those who know it 
as the home of the Belchertown State 
School carry away no happier impression. 
It is a quiet (i.e. : dead) town where nothing 
happens and whose inhabitants live on 
home-canned tomatoes and dried wood- 
chucks, right? 

Wrong. Belchertown is a place that can 
inspire affection in the most transient of 
residents For the most part, the town 
seems glad that the October Town Fair and 
Chicken Barbeque is not in tourist 
guidebooks and that the cheese danishs of 
Leopold's remain undiscovered by the rest 
of the world. Maybe that's why they 
changed the name in the first place. You 
see, legend has it that the town was 
originally named Cold Spring, later changed 
to Crystal Spring. When Gov Belcher 
died in the late 1700's, the town was 
renamed m his honor. 

Crystal Spring lives on in the Crystal Spring 
Shopping Plaza on Route 9's intersec 
tion with Route 202 Belchertown renr^ins 



voluminous as those from Proust's 
madalaine The prune fil'ing - n'>t b?j, 
either, thojgh the blueberry is s> indeed 
tasteless crap and should be avoideo. 

The cheese danish is me defiii.'.»-> »«ani«.^» 
anyway so why pass up a syirtphony of 
flavors for lemon or blueberry colored 
chemicals? You are in a place truly out of 
time at Leopold's anyw»y i hMV'> *«««-) 
challah bread tor sale fx the couiter, a 
braided loaf of ugg-bread whose richness is 
a song in itsef . i ht> rolls resemble hard roUs 
and not bulkie or Kaiser or water rolls. 

The lunchroom (Leopold s serving hours 
are roughly 6;30 am to 3:30 p.m.) has its 
share of good and bad: good kielbasa, terri- 
We meat balls (too much sugar in the 
sauce), decent cole slaw, no french fries. 
The breakfast specials range from 65 cents 
for one egg, toast and all the coffee you 
can drink, through two eggs, etc. for 96 
cents and $1 60 for bacon or ham. 

Home fnes are extra and the pancakes are 
never available. The daily lunch specials are 
honr^ennade - meat loaf, stuffed cabbage, 
meat balls, turkey (cut from a whole bird 
that has been roasted out back), baked 
haddock on Friday - and until a recent 
shakeup in personnel were delicious (ex- 
cept for the aforementioned meat balls). 
The turkey (served every Thursday) has 




Food 



a name on a sign orTTheTTas^ike^Vhar 
would a food lover find in the hot spots of 
Belchertown, should they follow that Pike 
sign or turn up Route 202 and head for 
Belchertown Center? 

Well, for one thing they would find the 
finest cheese danish outside of the Greater 
New York Metropolitan Area in a place called 
Leopold's. Leopold's is an everything 
store - notions, stationery, magazines, 
band aids and shampoo - where there is a 
small bakery counter where cheese 
danishes and other delicacies can be 
bought and a small counter and six table 
cafe carved out of a back room where they 
can be devoured with cup after cup of 
(usually) acceptable coffee. The baked 
goods are all brought up fresh daily from 
Gus and Paul's in Springfield and they are 
delicious. 

The cheese danish here is the folded kind, 
a glazed bit of cheese peeking temptingly 
from under a flap of pastry dough. The top 
is sticky with a honey syrup glaze whose 
very aroma brings back memories as 



* Bakke 



gone back to its usual r>igh qualUyTuTtlw* 
new help's attitude is not very professional 
and they do not serve up meals with 
Leopold's customary aplomb. 

But if you claim to love the cheeso danish, 
come to Leopold's early on& morning, 
Sunday perhaps, buy a cheese damsh and 
the New York Times and treat yourself. For 
those of you lucky enough to be born out- 
side of New York City, come anyway. 
Leopold's sells Pciston. Worcester, Spring- 
field, Amherst, Northampton and 
Belchertown papers. You don't have to 
read the New York Times to love cheese 
danish. There is no finer way to set yourself 
up for an afternoon at Quabbin or a drive to 
Boston than by relaxing in the unhurried, 
although smoky, atmosphere of a quiet 
New England cafe. 

Leopold s is in Belchertown Center on 
Route 202. It is between Choquene's 
Market and the Hampshire Bank There is 
ample parking in the town lot and credit 
cards are not accepted Come early; they 
sell out fast. 



CONT. FROM PAGE 4 
some truth in both positions The situation 
is much like that of the blind men who tried 
to describe an elephant according to which 
part they touched. 

Between 1966 and 1976 the proportion of 
black families with income of $15,000 or 
more increased from 19 to 30 percent and 
black families with incomes over $25,(XX) 
grew from 3 to 8 percent. But during this 
decade the numbclr of unemployed blacks 
doubled "vtd the number of unemployed 
adult black men tripled. Also alarming were 
reports that the number of female-headed 
families among blacks (which are most like- 
ly to be poor) becanDe the rule rather than 
the exception. 

These developments not only 
documented the development of a dual 
economy that tracks the poor and the mid- 
dle class into separate and unequal futures. 
It also that gains made in the ly not have 
been permanent. In its June 
1978 issue. Black Enterprise Magazine 
reported that the proportion of poor blacks 
is increasing whileumber of those in 
the lower middle class is shrinking, 'of the 
economy higher today than it 
used to be, but the base for black advance- 
ment into the middle class is now weaker 
than it was in the late 1960's," the 
magazine said. 

What these statistics indicate is that the 
likelihood of real competition for whites 
from minorities is not only remote but 
becoming less likely as we near the end of 
this decade. 

Because education is such an imp>ortant 
gateway to opportunity in America, in- 
creasing attendence of blacks in colleism. 

But the 

growth of black attendence in college from 
4.6 to 10.7 percent of all students fails to 
note that more than 60 percent of blacks 
are attending two year colleges and voce 
tionablacks in four- 

year colleges and professional schools has 
stopped or declined The New England 
Journal of Medicine reported that the 
number of blacks applying to medical 
schools has decreased in recent years and 
that the pool of qualified applicants is so 



snrwll that the resurgence of applicants in 
the near future is not likely. 
None of these statistics have been able to 
dissuade whites from the view that blacks 
have moved "too fast" in their struggle for 
equality Because of the concentration on 
the racial aspects of opportunity, the more 
profound and fundamental problems of ac- 
cess to the middle class for all Americans 
has been virtually ignored. 

The passage of Proposition 13 in Califor- 
nia was clear evidence of a tax revolt 
without political content or rigorous 
analysis, A CBS-New York Times poll 
showed that 72 percent of those who voted 
for property tax cuts expected the cuts to 
be made in welfare paynr>ents to the poor 
and the elderly. Yet, only 11 percent of pro- 
perty taxes could be attributed to the costs 
of social welfare programs. 

The Justices of the United States 
Supreme Court turned the same economic 
blind eye to the Bakke case as did California 
voters in their headless revolution against 
an unbearable burden Most Annericans 
probably would be surprised to learn that 
the United States is second only to France 
among industrialized nations in the unequal 
distribution of wealth. 

A Yale University Medical School pro- 
fessor has suggested that the horrible crush 
of applicants on medical schools could be 
resolved by shifting the millions of dollars 
expended on marginal medical school 
research into a program of "open admis- 
sions." This method would be much more 
fair in selecting physicians than any in ex- 
istence and the unqualified would be 
eliminated by the high rate of attrition. But 
his solution is not likely to be accepted, he 
admitted, because medicine is as much an 
industry as it is a discipline. As long as 
there are no basic economic reforms, the 
masses of profoundly disappointed young 
people will continue to grow. 

The effect of the U.S. Supreme Court 
decision ordering Bakke''s admission is to 
suggest that it is acceptable for whites to 
lose places to other whites in a potentially 
disruptive struggle for limited op- 
portunities, but not to blacks or other 
minorities. 



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SP0RT STORE 

p. AND 

K^ THE AMHERST RECREATION DEFT. 
ANNOUNCE 
rH THE 2nd ANNUAL 

AMHERST OPEN TENNIS TOURNAMENT 

Men's & Women's Singles: *3-7 August 1978 
Men's & Women's Doubles: 10-13 August 1978 
Mixed Doubles: 17-20 August 1978 

2 Divisions: Competition & Recreation 
Singles Elimination 

Matches will be played as follows: 

Thurs. & Fri. evenings starting at 6:30pm. Mill River Recreation Area 

Saturday mornings & afternoons starting at 9:30 am 

Saturday evenings starting at 6:30pm 

Sunday mornings and afternoons starting at 9:30am 

('Depending on the abe of the draw, the men'» »lngle» flnaH may lake place Monday 
evening. 7 Aug. 1978) 

Entry Fee: Amherst resident (zip codes 01002, 01003) $2.00 
Non-resident $3.00 (per person per event) 

Entry Foniis available at The Sport, Store A Amherst Rccreatlon Dcpt. 

Deadlines: Singles 29 July 1978 6 p.m. - Draw posted 1 Aug. 
Doubles 5 Aug. 1978 6PM ■ Draw posted 8 Aug. 
Mxd. Doubles 9 Aug. 1978 6 p.m. - Draw posted 15 Aug. 

PRIZE.S WILL BE AWARDED TO FINAUSTS AND RUNNERS UP 
QUESTIONS? Call The Sport Store at 253-2719 

(NOTE: Junior Events To Be Announced At Later Date) 



But is it good? 
Mum's the word 



ByKENSHAIN 

There is nothing more exasperating than 
having to write a column about current 
record releases and having next to nothing 
to say about them. Don't get me wrong; 
there are a lot of fine releases this summer 
but the lack of anything extraordinary to 
say about them leaves us in the cul de sac 
of poor copy and a disinterested reader 
ship. Be that as it may, it is my *• preme 
responsibility to you the reader an., lo the 
record companies that plie our c awers 
with records to report, in print, the latest 
news concerning new products on the 
horizon and those currently in the stores. 
Therefore, I am suspending my critical sen- 
sibilities for the duration of the column to 
assure you, the reader, of fair and objective 
coverage of the market with little or no 
"subjective " interpretation or evaluation. 
Need I say now, dear reader, that the 
burden will be on you to decide whether or 
not to buy the new Flamin' Groovier 
Now album on Sire, without the vital 
assistance of a certified music critic's opi- 



Whether or not you will like the rest of the 
album, I wouldn't know. Maybe you could 
find out from the Advocate or something. 

Island Records, recently purchased by 
^9m9r Brothefs. has its two last releases 
as an independent out this month. Fams, 
by Grace Jonas, is a danceable melodious 
record that will find its way to many parties 
before the summer is out, I'm sure. Here 
Grace sings in different tongues to a back- 
ing track of undeakable disco music, ar- 
ranged to complement style, not deshevie 

V— ?f '■•^* *'**'" '*■''• ''V Stoma 
Yamsshta is a two-record set that con- 
tinues (and in this case, finalizes) the Island 
tradition of bringing to the public the finest 
of international pop music to the American 
consumer at a reasonable price. Assisting 
Stomu on this you-decide-if-its a classic is 
Stevie Winwood, AI DiMeola, Michael 
Shrieve and Klaus Schuize, who together 
produce a sound not unlike what each of 
them do independently. 
This month also brings a surpise to guitar 
lovers. John Renbourn and Stefan 
Grossman have a release on Kicking 



Arts/MusIc 



nion. All I will tell you is that the Groovies 
synthesize a sixties- like sound that allows 
them to cover effectively period pieces in 
the context of their own sound; they do to 
the rest of the sixties what the Rutles did to 
the Beatles. You will also have to do 
without my opinion on the new Talking 
Heads thriller, More Songs About 
BuikRngs And Food also on Sire. Here 
we have a new band that makes what 
sounds music and is sure to sell its share of 
records. 

Curtis IV^yfield has a new one out c 'lied 
Do It All Night. It is on Curtom Records 
and could possibly be one of Curtis best 
releases ever, i wouldn't know. What I do 
know IS that this record explains why Bob 
Marley and Jr. Murvin consider Mr. 
Mayfield their favorite American musician. 

Maybe by now you've heard the new 
Waiter Egan song. Magnet and Steel, " 
on the radio. This song is from his current 
album on Columbia, Net Shy, and 
features members of Fleetwood Mac 
sinqinq and playinq along with Walter. 



Mule Records that, much to my 
disinterestedness, could knock your teeth 
out. Two guitar greats, one, formerly of the 
Fugs, the other, a product of ♦he British 
blues scene of the early six,.os combine 
their talents here in what sounds like a 
duet Could be great stuff. Let me know. 
Anthony Braxton, a young composer 
and multi-instrumentalist who is perhaps 
most noted for his titling of compositions 
with picto-graphs also has a new release 
• out this month on Arista called For Trte. 
Hei is music that seems as disinterested in 
Itself as this column is in it. Though I doubt 
that Braxton will get much airplay with this 
release, it is sure to command much of the 
music intellegentsia s time and anention 
this summer in the way of conversation. 
Well, that about wraps up this week's col- 
umn. Sorry if I didn't have any clever things 
to say about any of the records or have any 
worthwhile opinions concerning their pur- 
chase but, hey, it's a hard life and some 
decisions you'll have to learn to make on 
your own. 



ECM — is it no longer 
the 'creative ^/abe/? 



John Abercrombie, Jack DeJohnette, 
Dave Holland 

GateM«y2(ECM) 

Bill Connors 
Of IVist and Mehing {ECM) 

Pat Metheny 
Pat Metheny Group (ECM) 

Reviewed by W. ANDREW SUNDSTROM 

Here are three new releases from ECM, 
which once billed itself as the "creative" 
label, although clearly it no longer is and 
seems to have recognized this by pulling 
the motto from its liners. 

ECM specializes in what can best be called 
"ECM music," mostly progressive Euro- 
pean and Annerican jazz and jazz-rock. 
Most ECM albums are produced by Man- 
fred Eicher, who often forms recording ses- 
sions from a pool of like-minded musicians 
including such "notables" as Bobo Sten- 
son, Jan Garbarek and Gary Peacock, 
along with some genuine all-stars like 
vibraphonist Gary Burton and pianist Keith 
Jarrett. 

This was all well and good back when 
ECM music was truly unique and the musi- 
cians were excited about making it. The 
past few years, however, have brought a 
flood of mediocre albums that all sound the 
same (all the covers look the same, too). 
The present three constitute a case in 
point. All are listenable but only second- 
rate examples of the musicians' 
capabilities. 

GatevMiy 2 pairs, once again, John Aber- 
crombie and Jack DeJohnette, surely the 
most formidable guitar-drum combination 
in contemporary music. New music veteran 
Dave Holland joins them on bass. Save the 
spirited "Nexus" on side two, the album is 
a disappointment. The solos are 
uninspired, and DeJohnette, a percus- 
sionist quite simply in a catagory by 
himself, lays down his usual polyrhythmic 



underpinnings without the adventurous 
spirit which typifies his best stuff. 
Of Mist snd Malting, by a boring 
guitarist named Bill Cornors, is the worst 
of the three, although it too features a truly 
distinguished (if not distinguishable) 
quartet, ir>cludir>g DeJohnette in another 
lackluster p>erformarKe. Joining these two 
are bassist Gary Pescock and saxophonist 
Jan GartMrek. 
Both sides of this album sound about the 
same. The free-form compositions, all by 
Connors, are dull, dull, dull. All I can sug- 
gest is that listeners unfamiliar with these 
muswians can look elsewhere for their best. 
Garbarek, who possesses a uniquely cokl 
and steely tone (it gets on my nerves, but 
you might like it), is phenomenal on 
"Belonging" .with Keith Jan«t. And last 
year's "New Rags" by Jack DeJohnette's 
group Directions (featuring Abercrombie 
on guitar) is a powerful musical statement 
by thest two. Anyone interested in Bill Con- 
nors shouldn't come to me for advice. I 
don't know what he's doing in the com- 
pany of giants. 

The last album, called simply Pat 
Methany Group, is of a somewhat dif- 
ferent musical variety, being much more 
rock oriented than the other two. Metheny, 
a brilliant young guitarist, is joinsd by three 
relative unknowns for a satisfactory, if 
somewhat subdued, effort. 

Metheny is best-remembered for his eery 
twelve-string solos when he was playing 
with Gary Burton, and the Burton influence 
is quite evident throughout this album. A 
nice touch is the rather odd-sounding use 
of acoustic piano by Lyie Mays in places 
where electric would seem to fit most 
naturally. 

For the most part this music is a little too 
melodic, too slick, to provide a medium 
sufficiently creative for Metheny's cutting 
edge. Good stuff to play when you're 
entertaining those guests who frown on 
Elvis Costello and old Steely Dan but who 
aren't yet ready for Sun Ra. 



8 Collc ^itin. 



aWednesday, August 2, 1978 




L 



Filivi 



"Citizen Kane,' written and directed by 
and starring Orson Welles, will be 
presented by the UMass Summer Film 
Series on -Tuesday. August 8, at 7 30 and 
9:45 p m in the Campus Center 
Auditorium Admtsston isfree. 



rhEATRE 



Clowns John Townsen and Fred Yorkers 
of "If Every Fool" will perform acrobatics, 
juggling, pantcmine, magic and slap stick 
comedy on Wednesday, August 9, in the 
Campus Center Auditorium 



The program is sponsored by the Summer 
Activities Program and the Arts Extension 
Service. 



Jason Miller's award winning "That 
Championship Season " will be performed 
in Mount Holyoke's "Festival Tent " by the 
Mount Holyoke College Summer Theatre 
from Wedriesday, July 2 through Saturday 
August 5. at 8:30 p m For tickets, call the 
box office at 538 2406 Because of some of 
the language and subject matter this play is 
recommended for mature audiences only. 



"Don Juan In Hell," Act III of "Man and 
Superman, " by George Bernard Shaw, will 
be presented at the Mount Holyoke College 
Summer Theatre from August 8 to August 
12, at 8:30 p m Call 538-2406 for tickets 
and information. 



Rosenhontz, two musicians who pefform 
a blend of folk music, jazz and humor, will 
appear on Wednesday, August 2, in the 
Campus Center at 8 p.m 

The musical duo is made up of two men, 
Gary Rosen and Bill Shontz. During th«r 
five years together, the two men have per- 
formed original and well-known songs on 
guitars, flutes, clarinet, saxophone, and 
voices. 

Rosenshontz is based in Brattleboro, Ver- 
mont, and have traveled together 
throughout New England, New York, and 
New Jersey. They have made many televi- 
sion appearences and are currently working 
on their own show for children. 

The two men will be artists -in -residence at 
UMass during the week of July JO to 
August 5, and will teach a workshop in 
Wnting the Popular Song, examining the 
style and structure of popular music. 

Admission is free for Summer Arts Hostel 
participants, 50 cents for Summer Session 
students, $1 for children arnl senior 
citizens, and $2 for the general public. 
Tickets will be available at the door. 

Rosenshontz is presented by the Summer 
Activities Program in cooperation with the 
Arts Extension Service, and is another of 
the weekly events in the "Celebrate Sum- 
mer" performance senes. 



CONCERT 



The Little River Band and the George T. 
Gregory Band will give a free concert by the 
Campus Pond at 2:30 p.m., Wednesday, 
August 9. 



Concessions will be available, and no cans 
or bottles will be allowed. 



The Little River Band is best known for 
their top-40 hit "Happy Anniversary, 
Baby." 



The concert is sponsored by the Summer 
Activities Program and the Union Program 
Council. 



MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 



VOLUME V. ISSUE 10 WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 2, 1978 




*»HHifni M*%«si<i|' 



H tlMM'tl*. 



I M I 



UM Building A uthiority 
regaining controi 




IWidnesday, August 2. 1978i 



Communication problems in past 



■CQitegiaa 



Building authority to be more active 



ByLAl/RA KENNEY 

The UMass Building Authority is currently going through 
some changes »n an attempt to gain control over the 
management and maintenance of campus buildings. 

Thf building authority, formed in 1960, was "established 
as a separate fiscal and corporate entity for the general pur- 
pose of financing buildings that are auxiliary to the 
academic and administrative activities of the Universitv ' 
according to the introductory notes of a summary of 
reporib and audits published early this year. 

The role of the authority is to receive monies coJIected by 
the UMass Board of Trusteesiorbuildingproiectsauthon^ed 
by the building authority. The authority then puts the 
money into accounts where tt is held until it is used to pay 
off Im, ids fO( various buildings 

iccording to building authority member Evan V 
joM'i..!on, ■ W' tyl are m the process of 

r«detif;ing our -. ,, past, he said, the authority 

not been notitieo of many problems with or proposed 

..('((♦^s for Cf^r. i- - ■ .. "For a long time we were a 

vf;r\ (i)ssiveas I lot of (uoblems have come 

Ul. witfi rnr- 

Through 
buitf lings »-s).(Cia!ly the dormitories on campus, is given 

' ' i "The authof'ty 

!v.:'dings whose 



he said. 
yi,inent of the 



ove' '( It If 
IS ultimatt^lv " 
bunds have r,. • 

The authority . .,,.,,,,^,,.0 y. ;,,,,, 
every five years by the governor 
1 last June tc set up ■ 
' and THport basic pn 



. UM .icfs appointert 
voted at Its annua 
1 sub cornmittee to 
10 the entire group 



Johnston, who is tfiu' chairman of the three-rrtember sub 



.1-,. -.*- bi-iveekly meetings 

.elop some simule 
•s. especially with regard to tl;u 
V he notified of any change in the 



committee, said t^ 
througf>out the • 
fwlicK's and p- 
policy that thr 
facilities." 

The next nujcur vj of the sub committee is Friday in 
Worcester, and after that the members will meet on this 
campus Aug 11 Johnston said at that time he and the two 
other committee members will tour the Southwest 
Residential Area buildings. 

The authority, according to Johnston, had not been 
n-ade aware of the $447,000 "clerical error" which surfaced 
Icst year in the Campus Center audits until news of it ap 
peared in area newspapers, and most recently had not 
been notified of the findings made last summer by an out- 
side firm which had done an audit of the residence hall 
system and recommended that $18.9 million be spent for 
housing system renovations. 

Included in the $18 9 million figure is $8 7 million needed 
to bring dormitories and University owned married 
students housing complexes up to health and safety code 
standards. The most immediate needs to be met, ac- 
cording to thf audit, are the installation of fire detection 
and control devices and repair to leaky roofs. 

In January the University installed 7,000 snrwke detectors 
in dormitory rooms, and more permanent devices are cur- 
rently being installed. 

Johnston said a "communication problem" had 
developed over the years between the University ad 
ministration and the authority, and that there is a com- 
munication problem "even among the various University 
agencies." 

"We (the building authority) have a great deal of respon- 
sibility, but no authority," Johnston said. "We're trying to 
gam back authority in order to keep parts of the University 
from biting each other's throats." 

He said, "We have to work together (with the administra- 
tion) to fix the dorms up and make them habitable. I think 




Barrels catch water leaking through the ceiling of the Campus Center Concourse The leaks 
brtama K^nnUf* ''°"^ "''°''^' '"''"^ '"""* ^* ''P'''**' P*' °^**'*' of the UmSJ; Buildrng Aut 



are a result of 
Authority, (photo 



the student lease is a good idea; it's beneficial to the 
University and to the student." 

A proposal for a student iease has been drawn up which 
would spell out the conditions for fee payment, room 
choosing, duration of occupancy, damage policy and a 
rebate schedule Upon signing the lease the student and 
the University would be bound to legal obligations. The 
lease proposal is scheduled to be presented to the trustees 
next month. 

Johnston said, "in the late 60's, the University abrogated 
a lot of its responsibility in terms of control (in the dorms). 
A lot happened that should have been clamped down on; 
the lease will serve to remedy some of that." 

He said the communication problems between the ad- 
ministration and the authority were "partially our fault. 
We've not had the meetings we should have; I recommend 
that we meet on a regular basis, perhaps monthly." 

However, Johnston said, "We're not trying to pinpoint 
the blarr>e on anyone (for past mistakes and problems). 
We're just trying to reestablish lines of communication." 

A great problem in the repair and maintenance of 
buildings is that "the University grew so fast, the ability of 
maintenance couldn't keep up with the buildings," ac- 
cording to Johnston. He said each dorm should be repaired 
and maintained on a regular basis, but that time goes by 
and buildings "just haven't been gotten to" for repairs. 

He referred 'especially to the Southwest Residential Area 
dorms, most of which have serious problems with roof 
leakage, and to the Campus Center leaks which occur 
because of faulty roof sealing. 

In order to supply the Universitv with initial funds for such 



repair work, tt>e autttonty voted earlier this summer to 
release money held in reserve accounts, including a $334,- 
138.55 Housing and Urban Development grant which sub- 
sidized the Sylvan area residence project. The mor>ey 
should be given back sometime in the fall, according to 
Johnston, and will be used for general dorm maintenance. 

The building authority's membership includes three 
UMass alumni, three UMass trustees, and three members 
at large, all appointed by the governor and subject to reap- 
pointment. Johnston, who is a staff associate for education 
at this campus and is the director of the Northeast Metric 
Resource Center, is the only building authority member 
employed by the University. He has been involved with the 
authority for about 10 years. 

Student Organizing Project member David Barenberg said 
that students and the authority should communicate more, 
because they basically share similar goals. "The buildir>g 
authority is interested in paying off the bonds, but to do so 
the buildings have to be inhabitable," he said. "The 
students want the same thing. The buildings need tc be 
system-renovated so they won't deteriorate to unliveabte 
conditions." Barenberg helped to create the new student 
lease proposal. 

Student Government Association Co-president and stu- 
dent trustee Robert E. Dion said he would like to see stu- 
dent memt>ers of the building authority, in much the same 
capacity as the student trustees. Johnston said, 'I see no 
reason in the world why students shouldn't be on the 
board (the authority). But they'd have to get the legislation 
changed, which would take a long time. However, it wm 
done for the board of trustees." 



r 



Will there be ano ther Bernstein Festival? 



By MARK LECCESE 

American music may be the reason 
the Leonard Bernstein Festival of 
American Music was not as suc- 
cessful as many festival officials had 
hoped it would be. 

"Unless you play Mozart or 
Beethoven, they stay away in 
droves, ' Festival Driector Alan Light 
said last week 

Light put the paid attendence for 
the 18 festival performances at 
11,000, which raised $56,000 out of 
the festival budget of $200,000. 

"The festival was programmed' to 
have a substantial deficit that would 
be made up by other things," Light 
said There were about "10 or 15 
units' that contributed to keep the 
festival financially solvent, according 
to Light, including the University, the 
Fine Arts Center, and the 
Massachusetts Department of Com- 
merce. 

The Bernstein Festival was the most 
heavily publicized event ever at 
UMass, with much of the advertising 
budget coming from the state 
Department of Commerce tourism 
funds. Ads for the festival appeared 
in sucFi large and scatfered papers 
as the Boston Globe, the New York 
Times, and the Los Angeles Times. 

Light admitted that the attendence 
of 11,(X)0 was down from the figure 
festival officials had expected. 

Attendence at the symphonic con- 
certs was the lowest. The concerts 
that featured violinist Eugene Fodor, 



'If we were to do it again, 

Lenny (Bernstein) 

would have to be here. ' 

-Alan Light, Festival Director 



conductor and pianist Lukas Foss, 
and mezzo-soprano Florence Quivar 
with the Festival Orchestra were 
sparsely attended, \a/ith the Quivar 
concert, the last performance in the 
festival, drawing the smallest au- 
dience. 

Light blamed the low turnout at the 
symphonic concerts on the all- 
American music programs. "We 
didn't do as well as we had hoped, 
but that s what came with playing all 
American music. If they played the 
same program at Tanglewood that 
we played, they'd draw half the 
crowd that they now draw," Light 
said. 

"It's daring if a symphony orchestra 
plays even one American composi- 
tion," he said. 

Will there be another Bernstein 
Festival of American Music next 
year? Officials for the festival said, 
before it began, that they were at- 



tempting to make the festival an an- 
nual summer event. 

'This year we can find out whether 
there is indeed a market for an arts 
festival in Western Mass.," Fine Arts 
Center Director John Jenkins said 
before the festival began. "The 
festival will run this year and perhaps 
for more years. We are trying to build 
a festival which honors and displays 
American arts" 

Light said the possibility for a 
festival next year was "up in the air, " 
and said that the only guarantee of a 
festival next year would be if Leonard 
Bernstein agreed to appear 

"If we were to do it again, Lenny 
would have to be here," Light said. 
"He's the only one who could sell out 
any concert. A commitment from 
him, in my opinion, would be 
necessary." 
"If you keep doing it (presenting a 
festival), you'll eventually build up a 



big audience. But the question is, 
who's going to foot the bill?" Light 
said. 

Town officials had also hoped that a 
continuing summer program, like the 
Bernstein Festival, would boost town 
business. The recently established 
Amherst Central Business District 
Promotional Committee worked to 
promote both the town of Amherst 
and the festival, with signs advertis- 
ing the festival appearing in the win- 
dows of many downtown 
businesses. 

"The festival had a more positive ef- 
fect than most people are willing to 
admit," said William McKeon, chair- 
man of the Central Business District 
Promotional Committee. "I've heard 
businesses reporting anywhere from 
no increase to a 55 percent" increase 
in sales, he said 

"Given three, four, or five years, the 
festival could have a very dramatic 
effect, McKeon said 
The festival will continue to get 
good publicity even now that it's 
over, however. According to Light, 
the Public Broadcasting System's af- 
filiate station in Spnngfield, WGBY, 
will air a one-hour special on the 
festival featuring the Lukas Foss 
concert and the Florence Quivar con 
cert Light also said there is a 
possibility that WGBY could sell the 
special to the national PBS network. 
"There was something going on 
here in the summer for a change - but 
at what cost is the question," Light 
said. 



2 Colle gian. 



jWednesday, August 2, 1978 



w<j(^l(»J /-or-.*'- ysbtt» tb 



KnappTime 



HELIO. iT'5 Mr AQAW, D.C KWAFP 

AND I'VE. e££N 1RyiNl6 HARD To"* 
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Ak Dan Guidera 

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WOULD CEPTAIWLY KX>St 5CH0qL 

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A IRS... 



...HOWEVER, I THINK I'LL JU5T 
^EP THE DYNAMIC PEK^ONALiTi 
THAT I HAP AT Cornbx . 




Paeons fed repellant 
not avadde as reported 

Pigeons around campus are t>eing fed an 
avi repliant and not an avicide. as reported 
in last week's Collegian. 

The purpose of the avi repellant, which 
causes a flocJc alarming reaction and makes 
the pigeons behave erratically, is to keep 
the birds away from the area around 
Goessman Lab and away from some of the 
cow barns on campus, according to Al 
Sorenson of the Departn^nt of En- 
vironmental Health and Safety. 

Sorenson said that the avi-repellant has 
"no ill effects and is note poison." The avi- 
repellant goes by the brand narrte of Avi- 
Trol, and is registered with the En- 
vironmental Protection Agency, according 
to Sor«»rison. 

- MARK LECCESE 

Bromery attends . 
conference in SJ\fnca 

Chancellor Randolph W. Bromery is cur- 
rently in South Africa participating in a 
world peace conference there. 

Student Government Association Co- 
president Robert E. Dion, who spoke with 
Bromery prior to his trip, said the 
chancellor was one of 15 people chosen 
from outside Africa to participate in the 



conference. He said there are 15 attending 
the conference from South Africa, in- 
cluding seven white and eight black 
citizens. 

According to a UMass spokesman, 

"Bromery was probably chosen for his 
knowledge of the continent, as he sp>ent a 
lot of tinr>e in Africa doing a geological 
survey." In 1966, Bromery was a 
geophysical consultant to the State Depart- 
ment and performed a detailed geological 
survey for the US -Aid Program for West 
Africa. 

The spokesman said the conference, in 
dealing with the South African problem, is 
attempting to "establish a peaceful en- 
vironment for people to solve problems." 

Bromery announced his resignation as 
chancellor in June, effective in June of 
1979. He has not as yet announced his 
future plans. 

-LAURA KENNEY 



/\few transit service buses 
to arrive fiere in September 



The 26 new buses due for the UMass Stu- 
dent Senate Transit Service may arrive on 
campus by Sept. 1, according to Al Byam, 
Operations Manager of the Transit Service. 

"They're all off the line, but there's a lot of 
bugs to be worked out," Byam said last 
week. The buses are being manufactured 
by the General Motors plant in Pontiac, 
Mich. 

The buses will not arrive with wheelchair 



lifts installed, but "wheelchair lifts will be 
retrofitted by the company - either here or 
at the company as soon as the technology 
for front door lifts becomes available, ' 
Byam said. 
Eight to 10 buses will be equipped with the 
lifts, acording to Byam. 

MARK LECCESE 




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Ro/e of public higher ed chang/na 



irmk^^-3 



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Re org: Next year's top issue 



By MARK LECCESE 



The reorganization of public higher 
education in Massachusetts will be "ihe 
biggest issue in the State Legislature next 
year, " according to State Rep James G. 
Collins, D Amherst 

Collins will serve as vice chairman of the 
legislatures reorganization commission, 
which will begin meeting in January. The 
commission was set up by a resolve in the 
legislature that Collins initiated 

"We should start from scratch, " Collins 
said. "The process is very important. To 
have ideas cast in stone before the process 
begins would make a mockery of the com 
mission." 

Collins said the process and meetings of 
the commission would be "public and 
open' and "faculty, students and staff are 
going to have a very real part." 

The commission will not "just come up 
with a plan that people will react to We're 
going to build in working committees," 
Collins said. 

"What we have is a SO^campus public sec 
tor that lacks any guid oWh — or any coor 
dinated approach to the legislature At 
budget time, there are 30 public campuses 
going in to the legislature, and it's every 
campus for Itself That's bad Public higher 
education has to stand together to be 
strong," Collins said 

The organization that now exists to repre- 
sent higher education "s interest in the 
legislature, the Board of Higher Education, 
"just doesn't work, " according to Collins. 
According to Collins, the bc^rd is not ef 
fective t>ecause of its 'segmented r^ature. 
It doesn't work well because it has been 
stonewalled by the people in Boston; most- 
ly by the secretary of education Last year, 
the board didn't even make a budget 
recommendation ' 
The commission that will begin meeting at 
the beginning of next year will be made up 
of members of both the State House of 
Representatives and the State Ser>ate. ar>d 
will l>e chaired jointly by Sen Walter 
Boverini of Lynn and Rep. Frank Matrango 
of North Adams. Collins said the research 
committees that will work with the com- 
mission will be set up when school resumes 
in the fall. 

"There is a need for a central board," Col 
lins said, that would work on future plan- 
ning, budget co-ordination, and "in-depth, 
quality recommendations to legislators. ' 
Public higher education in Massachusetts 
should have a board that would work in 
Boston, and have the "ability to guide the 
system, but not run the system," Collins 
said. 

Other people m the State Legislature arnl 
in the executive branch of Massachusetts 



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government have proposed reorganizations 
of public higher education, the latest of 
these being the so called "Parks Plan," 
proposed by Secretary of Education Paul 
Parks. 
"I think it's terrible " Collins said of the 
Parks Plan. "He agrees with most people 
on what the problems are, but the method 
he used would destroy public higher educa 
tion "' 

The Parks Plan included the grouping of 
the 30 stHte and community colleges and 
universities into five regional systems, each 
having its own board of trustees as well as 
Its own specialized area of study 

Academic specialties is an absurdity," 
Collins said A university is a university 
because it offers a universe of research and 
knowledge To divide the university up 
would destroy the university. To have to 
take a bus to Worcester to take a science 
course is crazy." 

Collins criticized the Parks Plan for pro- 
posing "satellite campuses with no breadth 
or depth "" 
He also disagreed with the reorganization 
of public higher education proposal put for 
ward by former State Senate President 
Kevin Harrington. 

According to Collins, Harrington s plan 
called for an ""enornx}us centralization of 
power" and "stifled local thought and in- 
itiative." 
Harnngtonis plan would "isolate the deci- 
sion makers from ♦acuity, students arxJ 
staff," Collins said You have got to hav«» 
an exchange of ideas Faculty arnJ stu<J»v>t 
input is very important. ' 

Collins said he feels that public and private 
higher education should be viewed as "co- 
equal partners. It will be the work of the 
commission to build a stronger public sec- 
tor and one in which the private sector can 
also flourish The primary guide in our work 
will be the quality of education the students 
receive, " " he said 

"Right now, public higher education is 
leaderless There are 30 public campuses 
just sitting there, and the private sector is 
aware of this. Some members of the 
private sector, especially those with n>oney 
problems, are ready to argue that the public 
sector should be closed down piece by 
piece," Collins said 

"The University really has to pull itself 
together, " Collins said, 'with the new 
president providing a sense of vision to 
meet the new educational needs, which are 
going to be very different. " • 

Collins said the commission would be 
"taking the idea of public higher education 
up another notch, trying once and for all to 
solve the public versus private comoetition 
that goes on, especially in Boston-." 
He also said the commission wants to 
avoid "any rush into creating any large, 
central bureaucracies" 

We know what the problems are. We 
want to go about creating a system of 
public and private higher education which 
will be a vibrant system, of the best quality 
to serve the people in the state," Collins 
said. 



O^NSKlS 



X 



L 




1t-l Mm. lal. 

Downtown Amherst 



J 




Rep. James G.Collins 



•i' r^ ? » 



i":.:t. program changes 
head of residence system 



By LEE BURNETT 

Student and residential area ad- 
ministrators are instituting a reconfigura- 
tion of the Orchard Hill Central Area staff 
to be implemented this fall The proposal 
will reduce the number of heads of 
'esidence and will increase the respon- 
sibilities of the residential assistants on 
each floor. 
• More specifically, there will be one head 
of residence, to be called a cluster coor- 
dinator, for a group of two or three dorms 
These people will serve as "programatic 
resources, " according to Sally Freeman, 
director of the Community Development 
Center. "They would be freed up more to 
do what they are good at " She said 
students might go to them for "individual 
counselling, to design an academic pro- 
gram, or to set up a racism /sexism 
workshop." 

Seven or ten dorms in the Orchard Hill- 
Central area will be under the cluster 
system next semester These clusters are 
the "pilots "' for the possibility of clustering 
other dorms in the future, according to 
Freeman. 

Each cluster coordinator will have an 
assistant who will oversee the ad- 
ministrative operations of the dorms, in- 
cluding the security system, room selec- 
tion, and the damage reporting process. 

There are a number of issues that have led 
to this particular proposal. Freeman said 
"the loss of the tuition waiver for residential 
assistants has been really costly to the 
residential system. By reducing the number 
of professionals we can increase the com- 
pensation to the R.A.'s." Yearly stipends 
ifor R.A.'s will be increa"="* Vom $580 to 
$760 under the planned : ■■ •r:on. 



The starting salary for a head of residence 
»s about $7,400. The cluster coordinators 
will each receive a salary of about $10,000. 
Another basis for the proposal is the in 
loco parentis approach to house manage- 
ment that reflects itself in the current struc- 
ture. The proposal reads, "The continua- 
tion of the parental role of house staffs 
clearly indicates that students are not in 
fact responsible accountable adults, cannot 
take care of their own basic personal 
needs, and should not be expected to act 
as if they had that capacity." The proposal 
terms such an approach ""increasinoly 
bankrupt." 
Freeman said the new approach. "Is in 
keeping with the (residential) lease, a more 
contractual arrangement."' 
The R.A "s, now called Community 
Resource Persons, will assume some of the 
responsibilities of the former heads of 
residence such as taking room inventory, 
assisting in emergency situations, 
disseminating information pertaining to 
University regulations, as well as perfor- 
ming their traditional function of referral 
counseling. 
They will also be instrumental in organi- 
zing house councils. Freeman said, "The 
house council will decide what kinds of 
norms it wants, the personality and 
character of the house the whole gamut; 
what kinds of programming they want, 
whether they want to be a special interest 
area, the use of lounges. We are going to 
try to get the judiciary back in. People 
ought to know what norms they want and 
how to deal with people that don't abide." 
As of now, the specific duties assigned to 
cluster coordinators, assistants, and com- 
rnunity resource people have yet to be 
finalized and will vary from cluster to 
cluster. 



SUBSCRIPTIONS 
On canipus and off carnpus 



S2S0SunvnOT 



Mail delivery to Universify can>pus nnd Amherst area »anie 
Imsinpsi flay o* publication All othef .reas of Massac hijs«*tts 
(Ichverv toHowmy day Outside of Massachusetts allow 2 o' 3 days 
ilplivfry Send thetlt ill money ocdef to the MMsacbusMts Sunv 
mer Collegian Room 113 Campus Center Umve'sifv of 
Mass.« hiiselts Amheist Massaihusetts 01003 Please allow 1 
we«*k foi delivery tri start 

The office of the Massadiusetts Summer CoHegran is located 
■ Rfxjm 113 irl the Murray D t pmcoIii Cc'mpus Center on the Univer 
'. lit Massai huM'tIs campus Telephone Mb 3500 

The Massachusetts Suinmer Collegian is acrepted for mail 
m) uiirli • ihf ,ii,ituiiitv i\< .in ,ilI oI Conqrpss Marc h 8 1879 and as 
amended June 1 1 1943 

Sernnd i l.tss piisiaqe is (M.it in AmherM Masssachusetis 01003 
The Mastacihinetts Summer CoHegian publishes every Wednes 

■1.1V May 31 1978 thto.iqh A.,;i,,si '6 197H mrhisive 



^ — » 

MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER ^ 



(Mfe^ko 




X 



Co erlitot 

LAURA M KENNEY 
Co editor 

MARK A LECCESE 

B(r>iiif>ss Mandqer 

laur;c a wood 

(jr.i|)hif,s Mrtiifiijur 

BARBARAS LAMKIN 



Thesis paper & thesis binders 

at A.J. Hastings 
ne^rsdealer and stationer 



4S S. Pleasant St. 



Amherst 



Colle gian. 



Placement Service to help 
liberal arts grads this fall 

Bv THOMAS MAJOR ^ *^## 



iWednesday. August 2. 1978 



By THOMAS MAJOR 

An agressive attempt to sell job .nter- 
vtevvers on the virtues of liberal arts 
graduates wHI be one of the goals of the 
Placement Service ^hen ,t begins the 
school year this September 

The office will seek to attract interviewers 
from business and industry to UMass and 
•eek to match their needs with the eligible 
Uberal art^^tudent. according to Placement 
berv.ce Acting Director Arthur Hilson It 
w|il also begin to acquaint freshmen with 
trie proprarr so that students will devrtoD 
•onger and deeper relationships with the 
^Jcement Office, which m turn will assist 
rrm office m preparing the students for 
competition in the job market. 

Hilson said the office is inhibited by level 
funding and is restricted by limited and 
scattered office space available for job in- 
terviews, as well as providing other such 
services as classes in career self- 
oevelopnr>ent. establishment of credential 
"*•• '"terview preparation, and resume 



INoTJCfS 



writing. The restricted space .s also a pro- 
blern because interviewers from businesses 
tend to concentrate on universities which 
can provide attractive and spacious 
facilities for interviews, he said 
The placement service is adapting to 
changes in the objectives of the student 
body as the emphasis grows on job skills 
and employment possibilities as the job 
market tightens and students become more 
concerned with gaming marketable job 
skills from college. These changes make 
the placement service more valuable to all 
students despite its limited space and 
budget. Hilson said. 

In the future the Placement Office hopes 
to employ a computer to match job-seekina 
graduates with graduate seeking 
employers. This computer will also ac- 
quaint industries and businesses with 
liberal arts students who are qualified to fill 
their employment needs. 

Hilson said. Placement is on the fDove" 
for the future. 'Our objective is total ser- 
vice " 



r 



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AMHERS T TEL EVISION 

The Center for Community Access 
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i^.-**"*! ^^* ^^^"^ ^'" »»«' Amherst 
children between seven and aght years 
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rrt^^^'l^ ^J^o"^**' V°"^ «'»'« 'deas to: 
CCATV, Box 138. Amherst, Ma. 



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69 



our '\ltChen count on '-esnnpss S quahry 

2 ' ound pkg. - Stop & Shop 

^ce Pudding 

Greek Style AA^ 

jr2lb. pkg Macaroni Salad^p^F 
Cooked Chickens ■*■"""",;.' ' 1 09 
Fresh Cheese Pizza " 179 

SeaTOOQideas for change-of-peace meals' 

Fresh Cod 
FlUets !«? 

Cooked Fish Cakes '",:^:.ri t' 89 
Stuffed Clams ..,TZ\.... 1.79 




Shoulder Ix>iii11onBroa 1> 
Top Round lA^tidonBroU V^ 
Round Up gbfiilonBroa f 

26%"^ Fresh Beef Burgeis 'fl29 

•Contains not nnore thian 26"o fat ^ ^^ •*> 

20%*Lean Beef Burgers ^;?Si;ffa, 1.49 
14%* Extra Lean Beef Burgers 



lb 



Ih 



H Save20' Ig Save25'^ 

J::r. BouncepKg. ^R RaixJom Weight ?r' 

B Taste O'Sea £i2 Stop & Shop £1 
t- Batter ^g Cheeses |ri 
t| Dipt Eg All Ij 

I. Shnmp ft- Vaneties if 

i WJ^^^^T Jal^* ^ Dairy* J V i9|i 

Slop t Shop Coupon »j^-|^^ Slop « Shop Coupon ,[TJ| 

' fl Save35' M 

^ 24 ounce jar £g 32 ounce jar ^} 

pi Heinz §N Stop & Shop gj 
g Kosher Dill f [3 All Natural rj 



iSave20 



c =»- 



Spears Sm Mayonnaise 



:-i4 



1*]* y| GfOcery* p 






IT^ Grocery* _ ^^_ 

^» Stop 4 S^op CouDO" lU^^^'stoci Shop Cci^oo"^^,iiS 



ift rr <•».» couo:'- 



* contains not more s-i CQ 
Than 14, tat I.D^^ 



produce 

Sti good for v-^.' 



Large Fresh^^^^^^weet ^P ^^ 

caches ■? 3\ 



gSave20' 

t* Half Gallon Ctn. 

B stop & Shop 1^ "^r^Kh^^ 
i3 Drink<^ El3 Drink Mix 

g Fruit Flavored gjl^. p,nk Lemonade or ^ 
f:^ Iced Tea or Coffee ^\zS Strawberry >^ 



^g Save30 

^^hs 24 ounce can 

^^ WylersSoft 




Fresh Green 

Petmers 

3» 



Pf?r1ecf 'or 
salads 



Sweet 

and 

Juicy 

Jumbo California I Green or Yellow 

Cantaloupes Squash 



1:3 



2LDa^ry*J^ 
i i<too* ShoD Coupo 

Save 10' 



23 size 

Luscious !lav( f 



ocery* 
•'t^^ji'' ^'°P * ^*^^^ Coupon 

^ ^>iSave40 

ID ounce box 

Keebler 
Zesta 
H Saltines ^^^ 

1-^ Regular or Unsalted §lj^ 



==^!:g 100 count box 







Lipton ^ 
Flo-Thru 
Tea Bags 




HADLEY-AMHERST Route 9 at the Hadley-Amherst Line.8a.m.-10p.m.,Mon.-Sat. We redeem your Federal Food Stamps. 



. ill 



b^^i: 



1978 



The 

most 

important 

vitamin 




^^"^■^^.-M 




v^--- 



By JANICE EGGLESTON 

Millions of Amencans are deficient in the 
most essential vitamin contributing to good 
physical and mental health the vitamin B 
complex 

The B complex vitamins are active in pro 
viding the body with energy by converting 
carbohydrates into glucose which the body 

burns " They are also vital in the 
metabolism of fats and proteins 

The B vitamins are necessary for normal 
functioning of the nervous system and may 
be the single most important factor for 
health of the nerves In addition, they are 



CLASSIFIEOS 



ToSublaf 



essential tor the maintenance of muscle 
tone in the gast'omtestmal tract and for the 
health of skin, hair, eyes, mouth and liver. 

The 13 or more B vitamins are so meagerly 
supplied in the American diet that almost 
every American lacks some of them One 
reason there is so much B vitamin deficien- 
cy IS that Americans eat so many refined 
and processed foods from which the B 
vitamins have been removed 

Another reason for this widespread defi 
ciency is the high amount of sugar consumed 
Sugar, coffee and alcohol destroy the 



B complex vitamins Sulfa drugs, sleeping 
pills, insecticides and oral contraceptives 
also deplete the system of B vitamins. 

The known B complex vitamins are B1 
(thiamine), B2 Inboflavin), B3 (niacin), B6, 
B12, B13, B15, B17 (laetrile), biotine. 
choline, folic acid, inositol, and PABA. 
These water soluble vitamins cannot be 
stored as any excess is excreted. 

The need for the B complex vitamins in- 
creases during infection or stress. Nervous 
individuals and persons working under ten 
sion can greatly benefit from taking la/ger 
than normal doses of B vitamins. 
Alcoholics and individuals who consume 
excessive amounts of carbohydrates re- 
quire a higher intake for proper 
metabolism 

Children and pregnant women need extra 
B vitamins for normal growth. The amount 
of B vitamins needed seems to be related to 
the amount of female sex hormones 
availabe. Menstrual difficulties can be 
alleviated by incorporating more B \/itamins 
into the diet 

All B vitamins can be derived from 
brewer's yeast, liver or whole gram cereals. 
Oth^ good sources of vitamin B are ap 
pies, apricots, bran, barley, cheese, corn 
meal, dates, egg yolks, figs, leafy greens, 
mushrooms, nuts, raisins, rice, soybean, 
wheat germ, and whole wheat. While the 
Vitamin B complex can be obtained in syn- 
thetic form, natural sources are more readi- 
ly absorbed. 

Janice Eggleston is a private consultant 
for the North Shore Association for Retard- 
ed Citizens. 



House vUth Idtchen facility 19 Philips St 

Set- Mike located near BKO Frat $75 pei' 
r rxjnth 



Apt wanted 9 1 $175 Fem older CO Col 



Deertield Prive-ln Thr.itrv 

.j^f ♦ rt ■': tNr «••• •-- 






Wednesday. August 2, 1978, 



■Colle gian 7 



SP®RT STORE 

DONT MISS 

tlM 2iid ANNUAL 

AMHERST OPEN 

TENNIS TOURNAMENT 



MEN'S & WOMEN'S DOUBLES 10-13 August 
(Deadline for entries: 3 August) 

MIXED DOUBLES 17-20 August 
(Deadline for entries: 10 AUGUST) 

ENTRY FORMS AVAILABLE AT 

THE SPORT STORE & AMHERST RECREATION DEPT. 

QUESTIONS! CALL 253-2719 

178A North Pleasant St. Amherst 



^Iamj2ey-f). 

KAPMN 

Educational Center 

Call Days Eveninss & Weekends 

264 N. Pleasant St. 
Amherst, Mass. 

413253510S 




says 

WEDNESDAY 

MICNELOB NIfiNT 

Frti MunehiM 

12 oz. "^"^^ 



Bottlos 



JDON'T FORGET - HAPPY HOUR DAILY 

5 - 8 p.m. 

Monday all Nite long . 

M iller droughts 35' 
Most bor drinks 75' 

1 Pny Sl. AiriMfst S4S-S483 Niit tt tin hk 



ADULT ENTERTAINMENT 

MaJMtIc Cinama 

84 Cottage Street (Rte 141) 

Easthampton, Massachusetts 01027 

Tel 527 2346 

Aug a 8 

Do yon want to ba loved 7:30 
Confaasiona 8:80 



Air conditioned 



and' '81 net admittad 



it's NEW.Jt's FREE.... 
it's Available NOW! 

The FALL '78 CATALOG 
from Continuing Education 

UMas'./Amhcrst ^ -^rZJ^-^ 

3 easy ways to get your FREE copy, listing Evening College 
Courses, Credit-Free Workshops, and a whole k ♦. more: 

1. COME to 113 Hasbrouck 

I. CALL (41 3) 545-3653 

3. MAIL this coupon 

MjiI t.i T.mtinii.rKj f cJuC.Hijm, 1 1 \ Mj^Ri lutk, UnveiJily ■ t MjJUC^Liict H. 

AiiiliL'iSt, MA 01003 • ' 

Please sot)(l mc a Fall '78 Cntjlog 

Name . 

Addiess — 

City St.Tte Zip. 



tt? 



LbequeK5 5aLoon 

Amherst, Massachusetts 



flfffHERST's 
#1 HflPPY HOUR 

MON - FRI 4pm - 7pm 
WED 4pm - Closing 

Come for a drink 

Stay for dinner 

"IT'S WHERE 

THE ACTION IS" 

Corner 
University Dr. & Amity St 



BRANDYWiNE 

at Amherst 

Moving off campus? 



The University of Massachusetts is available 'o you through the ^y 
Division of Continuing Education. ^// 



• 1 bedroom 
starting at S240 
2 bedrooms 
starting at $300 
Gas utilities 
induded 

• Rental Office 
open: 
Weekdays 9 5 

•On UAAass 
bus route 
every 10 min. 




50 Meadow Street 
North Amherst 549-0600 



The Taco Villa: 
Well worth the trip 



By DON LESSER 

Morris LaFlamme becanr>e interested in 
Mexican food when he was stationed in 
California while in the service. When he got 
out, he hooked up with childhood friend 
Dan Achin, a professional chef and dieti- 
cian who had developed a love for dishes 
Mexican while in Texas, and they decided 
to open a Mexican restaurant somewhere 
in New England. They had just rejected 
Springfield when a place in Northampton 
became available, and Taco Villa was born. 

But not before the Center St. location had 
to have all its old restaurant furnishings, as 
well as a rear apartment, ripped out. 
LaFlamme and Achin did as much of the 
carpentry and remodeling as they could, 
buying a load of old church furniture from 
an organ builder who was moving to 
Detroit and trading some of it for cher- 
rywood paneling that their landlord hap- 
pened to have in his garage. 'Two target 



depending on whether the tortillas that 
wrap them are made of corn or wheat, ar« 
hard or soft or are folded or flat. The t)ean« 
are cooked from dry beans with no animal 
products used. The sausage has "tons of 
grease taken out" of it before it is spiced 
and served and the beef, too, is remarkably 
greaseless. Seventy pounds of chicken are 
cooked weekly, the bones going into stock 
which is added back to the chicken for ad- 
ditional flavor The Canadian is a mixture of 
p>ork, beef and chopped potatos and rK>t 
the Canadian bacon I'd surmised at first. 
The cheese is Cheddar. The enchilada 
sauce boasts a chili powder that is mixed in 
Mexico by a friend's grandnrK>ther and is 
delicious. 

Combination dinners are available after 3 
p.m. ar>d range from two enchilitos and 
fresh cut and fried potatos for $2.75 to 
$4.75 for more food than you can possibly 
eat. The salad deserves mention because of 
th e variety of ingred ients (cucumbers, 



Food 



dates had to be scrapped before everything 
was ready. They sold out of food in four 
hours their first day, cooked all evening and 
ran out their second day as well They final- 
ly managed to stay open a full shift on day 
three, but just barely. And they have been 
growing ever since. 

The best reason for that is their food Dan 
Achin spent a year researching recipes and 
sources and worrying whether New 
England palattes, notorious for their 
mistrust of anything spicy', would take to 
Mexican flavors. When Taco Villa first 
opened, their food was much blander than 
it IS today, and they sold sandwiches as 
well, just in case. Achin gradually upped 
the spices as customers suggestions showed 
that their food was appreciated. They 
have abandoned the sandwiches and each 
filling t>oasts a blend of flavors that beats 
every Pioneer Valley Mexican eatery, as 
well as most of the Boston and East Coast 
ones that I've tried. And no, it isn't too hot 
to eat - salt is a spice too, you remember - 
and hot sauce in two degrees of heat is 
available for those who need it. Setting 
aside the question of whether Taco Villa 
would be considered traditional in Mexico 
City, in Northampton it's quite a place. 

There are six basic fillings which become 
tacos, burritos, enchiladas or tostadas 



crunchy green peppers, black olives, red 
cabbage, eggs, cheese and onions besides 
lettuce and tomatosi and the large size, at 
$1.50 is a meal in itself. The chili has 
chunks of k>eef in it, is flavorsome, not 
dominated by beans or tomastos and is 
worth every penny of the $1.10 you pay for 
it. 

If all of this sounds too good to be true, 
don't t>elieve mo, try it. I've been here a 
numt)er of times since Taco Villa opened 
and I've never been disappointed. Taco 
Villa boasts that its staff has (with one ex- 
ception, who moved) been with it since its 
opening, which in the restaurant biz is truly 
rare. Taco Villa calls itself an alternative and 
I believe it is. Their food is tasty, nutritious 
and cheap, their staff is treated like human 
beings and encouraged to feel part of the 
family and their jukebox is excellent. If that 
isn't an alternative to mosx restaurants, 
what is? 

They are currently awaiting the ok. from 
the Amherst Zoning Board of Appeals to 
move into the space that the Yellow Sun 
Co-op is vacating, but until then, you'll 
have to go to Northampton. Do it. Taco 
Villa is well worth the trip. 

TACO VILLA. 21 Center St. Northampton. 
1 1-9 Mon. - Thurs. 1 12 Pri. and Sat. 12-8 
Sun. 584-0673. BYOB. 





\ 



8 Colle g ian, 



Wednesday. August 9, 1978 




MASSACHUSETTS SUMMER 



VOLUME V. ISSUE 11 WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 9, 1978 




SiimJ. r>i N. « s,^i|« f .,( ih. Jinx..,.is .| \«.,.s... I ,. imus Xmrwrsi \M .m.mm 141 «, -.4-, i-.m, 



If Every Fool... 



Clowns John Towwnsen and Fred Yockers 
of If Evpry Foot" will perform acrobatics, 
Hi(}(}li"n, pdntomime. equilibristics, magic 
.lori slapstick comedy m tfie Campus 
Centi'f Auditorium on Wednesday. August 
9. at 8pm 

Both artists have had extensive training in 
circus acts. Fred Yockers first performed as 
a clown With his father "Freddy the Tramp" 
at Coney Island's Steeplechase Park. He 
has studied mimn in New York and at the 



Wisconsin Mime School. 

John Townsen holds a PhD in theatre 
from New York University and is the author 
of Clowns: A Panoramic History, published 
by Hawthorne in 1976. Both men have 
studied at Ringlinq Brothers Clown Col 
lege 

The performance will come in the middle 
of their week as artists in residence at the 
University for the Summer Arts Hostel Pro 
qranv During the week of August 7, 



two 



Yockers and Townsen will teach 
workshops at UMass on clowning. 

The performance is presented by the 
Summer Student Activities Office in 
cooperation with the Arts Extension Ser 
vice, and is part of the weekly Celebrate 
Summer Performance Series. 

Admission is free to Summer Arts Hostel 
participants, 50c for Summer Session 
students, $1 for children and senior 
citizens, and $2 for the general public. 



CONCERT 



The Little River Band and the George T. 
Gregory Band will give a free concert by the 
Campus Pond at 2 30 p.m., Wednesday, 
August 9 

Concessions will be available, and no cans 
or bottles will be allowed 

The concert is sponsored by the Summer 
Activities Program and tht; Union Program 
Council 

In cas»i of rain, the concert will be held in 
doors in the Student Union Ballroom. 



tNeatre 



The Western Wind Vocal Ensemble will 
present "A Musical Garland of Love" on 
Saturday, August 12 at 8 p.m. at City 
Studio Theatre, 49 Pearl Street, Northamp 
ton. Tickets are $3 for the general public, 
and $1.50 for children and senior citizens. 
For reservations call 584 3978. 

"Don Juan In Hell, ' Act III of George Ber 
nard Shaw's play "Man and Superman," 
will be performed thrrjugh Saturday, 
August 12, by the Mount Holyoke College 
Summ"-- "Ti,,, jf.. Performances will be in 



the "Festival Tent," on the ground of the 
Mount Holyoke campus. For tickets, call 
the box office at 538 2406. 



FilM 




"King of Hearts," Philippe DeBroca's 
satirical study of war, starring Alan Bates 
and Genevieve Bujold, will be shown on 
Tuesday, August 15 at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. 
in the Campus Center Auditorium. Admis- 
sion is free. The film will be the last presen- 
tation in the Summer Film Series. 



Area treats sewage 



Wednesday, August 9. 1978 




Knap p: Bromery to 



gian' 




Randolph Bromery 



ByMARKLECCESE 

Chancellor Randolph W. Bromery will be 
returnmg to the Amherst campus this fall as 
chancellor and will serve there until June 
13/9, despite rumors that he would be leav 
mg h.s post this September, said incoming 
w^r^ President David C. Knapp last 

Speaking to a press conference of media 
representatives from the three UMass cam- 
puses last Friday. Knapp said, "My expec- 
tation after talking with Bromery is that he 
will serve as chancellor for the full 
academic year, and this fall the board of 
trustees will establish a search committee" 
B°romer ^ "^"^ chancellor to replace 

Bromery is in South Africa this month par- 
ticipating a world peace conference and 
could not be reached for comment 

The Amherst chancellor announced his 
resignation last March to put himself in the 
runri.ng for the UMass presidency, which 
dt the time was still vacant. Knapp was 
named president over Bromery by the 
hoard of trustees in May. 

Rumors that Bromery would not return to 
his post this fall had been circulating and 
Bromery s status with the University had 
tJeen m guestion when the board of 
trustees did not immediately accept the 
resignation he offered in March 
After a vacation with his family, Knapp 
has moved into the president's office in 



Boston to begin the transition from the ad 
ministration of acting president Frankin 
Patterson to his own administration Knapp 
will take over the position vacated by 
Robert C. Wood, who resigned last 
January and is now superintendent of the 
Boston Public School system on 
September 1. 

All three of the UMass campuses have lost 
their chancellor in the past year, and sear 
ches are being conducted on the Amherst 
campus for two of the three vice 
chancellorships as well. A new vice 
chancellor for student affairs on the 
Amherst campus, Dennis L. Madson will 
begin in that post on September 1 . 

This IS the ideal time for the University to 
put together a team of officers that can 
work as a team." Knapp said. 
Knapp says that he hopes to have an ad 
ministration "in which central offices and 
campuses could work in concert to mutual 
ends " 

Knapp said that he plans, if his schedule 
permits, to spend a couple of days each 
month on each of the UMass campuses 
He visited the Amherst campus/)n Monday 
and Tuesday of last week, but said that he 
had not yet visited the campus of U Mass- 
Boston, located on Columbia Point 

The offices of the UMass president were 
moved from the One Washington Mall of 
fices that were occupied by Robert Wood 
to the old UMass Boston building on 250 
Stuart Street in Boston. 




David C. Knapp 



Sewage plant to open in January 




By LEE BURNETT 

"By the year end we ought to be a 
triple-star community in terms of 
water pollution standards, ' said 
James Smith, town engineer, about 
the soon to be completed sewage 
treatment plant. 

Located in Hadtey, west of the 
Boyden playing fields, the plant was 
scheduled for completion in 
September of 1977 at a projected cost 
of $10.5 million. Delays are attributed 
to strikes, failures of subcontractors 
to pay men, and delays in receiving 
marerials Smith said the delay is nor- 
mal for a job of this magnitude." 
Engineers believe the project will 
now cost $11,165,000. 

The plant will receive regional 
sludge in addition to sewage from 
UMass and the town of Amherst, 
Hadley. Pelham. Shutesbury. and 
Leverett will also tie into the system 
and will pay a user fee. 

The Federal share of the project is 
$7,615,060, and the state share is 
$1,523,012, and the local share paid 
through user fees is $1,015,341. This 
leaves $400,000 still to be raised. Ac- 
cording to James Lindstrom, 
Amherst finance director, if the 
government doesn't take on the add 
ed cost the town can afford the extra 
cost without an increase in sewage- 



users fees because another town 
sewage treatment pro)ect will cost 
the town $400,000 less than an 
ticipated. 

The project has been in the making 
since 1970. Smith explained th» 
history leading to the new plant 
"Between 1964 and 1972 we had 
growth nobody expected. As a result 
we were dumping raw sewage all 
over the place- the Fort River, and 
the Mill River. When I got here in 1971 
it was gross." 

The old plant, built in 1939 has a 
peak flow capacity of 4.2 million 
gallons per day. Presently peak flows 
can reach K) million gallons a day if 
the University is in full session and 
there is a spring thaw or heavy rain, 
which invariably seeps into the 
system, according to Smith. The 
new plant can handle 8 million 
gallons a day "no sweat" and "it can 
be expanded if need be to handle 
peak flows. We can adjust the treat- 
ment accordingly and still come out 
with the effluent standards, " said 
Smith. 

Overflow occurred several times a 
month but now with a new pump 
"we can handle them all, but the 
treatment is inadeguate," said 
Smith. The .old plant is a primary- 
treatment plant. It removes 50 per 



cent of the solid waste through gravi- 
ty before dumping sewage into the 
Connecticut River. 
The new plant is a secondary treat 
ment plant David Sloan, chief of the 
new plant, described process It 
removes 85 to 90 percent of the 
solids through gravity, then bacteria 
(activated by lyme and aireation) 
consume the finely dissolved solids." 
The work still to be completed 
before the plant changeover at the 
end of the year includes hooking up 
the instrumentation, familiarizing 
people how to work it. and putting 
every process through a dry run. As 
Sloan said, "Once it's opened we 
can't stop it" 
Smith said there is flexibility with 
what is done with the sludge, the 
solid waste removed from the water. 
Right now it is trucked to the dump 
to be used for landfill. "It could be 
used for energy or farmers might find 
it economical for fertilizer." 




Colle gian. 



FA C announces 
1978- 79 season 



Wpdnfesday, August 9, 1978 



By^MARKLECCESE 

Concerts tn the Fine Arts Center wont be 
as inexpensive tor UMass students as ttiey 
have tjeen in the past years 

The Fine Arts Center anru^unced its con 
cert series for 1978 79 last week, artd along 
with the announcement came the news 
that UMass students will no toncjer pay on v 
halt price for tickets to performances m in. 
■ t series 

i I, is' t>i»t . ti.'itf nr 

I •• Kit -I'th Clhsmlu i ' 

|»?V bv ctiarying a S3 ^ •' > 
<ch UMass student payft m s 
i'lf-ii if-e t>iM 
The Council usually rars. t S90 000 

that way. according to Fine Arts Cent. 
Publicity Director David Letters But Utet 
year it cost t»ie Fine Arts Center $120,000 
to furnish students w«th the half price dis 
rnuiiT 

•lation would prevent 
"n; '■me Af!h („t.'n!t?r from i' 'Mass 

students the half price discou . ^>r\ ihis 

year In addition the Fine Arts Council has 
., , ,.,.rf f|,jt ,, vvould like to do some other 
/vitti the rnoney it raises through the 
» ifif Arts fee 

Ti ,^ vir the Fine Arts CourScil chose to 
inly a certain amount, and put 
money mto subSidi/mg other 
IS.' Letters said Letters said 
d noi know what events the 
: • or 

• ■ive discounts 
• . ^irw Arts Center ;>er 
''(■wever rar>gioo fM-"i a lifin.!' 
\f of the ''cfv-.tij series and 
.. v jeries to two dollars Off OO many 
o* thi:- other performances 
This year the Fine Arts Center will offer 
five different series, plus special attrac- 
tions The five series are Orchestra. 
Cetebnty. Dance. Broadway, and Concert 
Hall 

The Orchestra Series features the f^tt 
st>urgh "symphony, conducted by Andre 
P" vi» •• • Snrinof'eirJ Symphony perform 
ti»M ►^•'.♦ndel s Messiah two weeks before 
C>" the Boston Symphony Of- 

ch»' ,(j Sei|r 0/awa. returning for the 

fourth year to the FAC; and the Moscow 
Philharmonic 

The Ceiebrity Series includes guitarst 
Carlos Montoya. pianist Vladimir 
Ashken«fcry, P D Bach, and the Boston 
Pops conducted by Arthur Ftekjier 

■ .ssion cf Dracuia has been 



'VI 
JM.=»SS 




UMass Students no longer 
will get half-price discounts on all tickets 
to the Fine Arts Center concert series 



uifftrl frc.ni the Broadw.'y Series, arut 
"•otdcetl It with Side by Stde by Son 
oheim Also m the Broadway series ate 

California Suite." The Wi/," "Chicago. ' 
and Your Arms Too Short to Box With 
G<)U 

Ttie Dance Series features the Martha 
Graham Dance Company. The Paul Taylor 
Dance Company, the Royal Winnipeg 
R.iitet. Les Ballets Jaz/, and Stars of 
American Ballet 

Bobby Short. Chuck Mangione. Peter 
Alir-n and Jose Feliciano will perform in the 
Concert Hall Series. 

Special attractions include .i . p^r 

tormance by the Boston Sy<n|,i , v Tlu 
Niitr-arker by thr- Hartlorrf Ballet and 
pianist Andre Walts 




SUNDAYS 



The Excaliburg Special 

• Buy One GeiOneFtee • 

\hf K\(-;ililHiru l«iiliin-» 7t tHiiH^-o of hM>'' pun- Ifcif im a mil. 
»»itli l^'ttiio'. *»lMitl loiiiiiiiH-o. <«»!«■ s|;m ;in4l KniH-h ^^^»•v. 



Noi.M-9:(M>rM 





FENTON'S 

ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 

377 Main St. Amherst 253-3970 
9-5<30 MF 9-1 Sot. til Leber Day 



Let army ROTC 



taUe you whERE 

■ I I II ?-aia^— fe I M I i=^=a8gga=^=^=aB= 



you WANT TO go; 



[CALL 848-2321 



Wednesday. August 9. 1978 



Trustees vote to seek 
hospital rate increase 



By LAURA KENNEY 

BOSTON The UMass Board of Trustees 
at its monthly meeting last week voted to 
seek state approval it,< an II percent in 
crease in hospital rates for the teactiing 
hospital at the UMass Worcester Medical 
School. 

The request will now be submitted to the 
state Rate Setting Commission for ap 
proval. Last year, the 2 Vi year old, 61 bed 
hospital received a K) percent overall rate in 
crease . 

The trustees voted that a search commit 
tee consisting of II members begin to find a 
replacement for UMass Worcester 
Chancellor Roger C. Bulger, who resigned 
effective Dec. I to take a position at the 
University of Texas in Houston Two 
trustees. Kathleen M Popko and Gavin D. 
Robertson, will take part in the search, 
along with faculty, student, administrative, 
alumnus and community representatives 
from the Worcester campus 

Last week's meeting was the last for In 
terim President Franklin K Patterson, wfx) 
will return to the UMass Boston campus in 
the fall as the Frank L Boyden Professor, 
earning a yearly salary of $41,172.85. He will 
also represent the University in programs 
relating to the new John F. Kennedy 
Library Ijeing constructed at the Harl>or 
campus 

Patterson took over as interim president in 
January after former President Robert C 



Deerfield Drive- In Theatre 

Route 5 I 10 

Soulti Oterixid lltnKriwwt& 

T(> s&s-sm 



Aug. 9 15 




rOU NAVl SCEN 

CMCAT AOWEimiNiS. I 

VOUARi ABOUT 

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ca^Dus ce^iie' u' v o' '^ass af^f^e'St 



Wood stepped down from his sevwn year 
reiqn David C Knapp, chosen m May by 
the University's Presidential Search Com 
mittee, will take office Sept. I 

The board approved the appointment of 
Harry T. Allan as dean of the Scho- ' of 
Business Administration on the An ,t 
campus Allan was a member of ihe 
scfiool's faculty from 1965 to 1970, and has 
been provost and professor of business ad 
ministration at Northeastern University 
Since 1976. He succeeds George S 
Odiorne, who resigned as dean last year. 

The trustees authorued Patterson to offer 
the Gulf Oil Corporation about $200,000 to 
purchase about 80.000 square feet of pro 
perty on Morrissey Blvd., near the UMass 
Boston campus Gulf owns the land upon 
which IS a Mass. Bay Transit Authority tram 
station. 

Patterson said Gulf wanted to sell the pro 
perty. which may have meant the removal 
of the station 'That station is our lifeline to 
mass transit, " he said The board got 
capital outlay funds to buy the land and ac- 
cess to the terminal " The parcel of land 
was leased to the University m January of 
i')/4. 

By moving the station, buying other 
land, there would be a serious impact upon 
the campus and especially on the new JFK 
Liljrary. ' Patterson said 

In otfier board action, it was decided to 
change the name of the Institute for Man 
and Environment on the Amherst campus 
to the Environmental Institute. Frederick S. 
Troy, chairman of the Committee on Facul 
ly and Educational Policy, said, "It used to 
t)e the Institute for Man and His Environ 
ment, and a while ago we took the his' out 
of tfie title I guess we were pretty sexist. 
t>ecause we forgot about the man''" 



massachu<;etts summer 




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1 "n f'flifof 

LAURA M KENNEY 
Cr. »?di:ur 

fy/UVRKA LECCESE 
Hiisii'irss Managi-r 

LAUR C WOOD 

> l|>t" , " . .Ml'-' 

o«-.RBARAS LAMKIN 




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ENTER 
MEDICAL 
SCHOOL NOW 

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Transfer & Beginning Students 

Accepted 

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PROVEN MEDfCAL STUDENT 
PLACEMOrr SERVICE: 

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New York N Y 10027 

(212)865-4949 




Daily Salad 
Specials 

Sandwiches 

Fresh Yogurt 

Smoothies 

Bagels and Spreads 

Baked Goods 

Homemade 
and Always Fresh 



at Faces ncxl to the Amherst Post 

Office 

Vhours: 8 00 5 00 256-^955 V 



iColle ^ian 




Cows watch a baseball* game at the playing field next to 
the North Amherst Youth Center (Photo by Laura Kenney) 



Transit authority files suit 
to gain garage approval 



By LEE BURNETT 

The Pioneer Valley Transit Authority last 
week took the only course of action left 
open to them in their protracted t>attle to 
i^mn local approval for a new bus garage to 
be locatofl on Commonwealth Ave 

The PVTA last week filed suit in an at 
tempi to overrule the town of Hadley's 
refusal of the project 

Hadley Building Inspector Frank Ba| turn 
ed down a request for a building permit and 
tl»: /oning tx>ard of appeals refused a 
variance on the grounds that the site does 
not have the required frontage on a travel 
ed road Ba| explained that frontage is re 
quired on a "traveled way" to ensure public 
access. Commonwealth Ave. is privately 
owned by the University 

PVTA director Terry Tornek said, "The 
lease arrangement between the University 
and the PVTA requires they (the University) 
prr.vi'lr^ access, and the University intends 
r.nminr.nwealth Ave.) f>e a "traveled 
■' ■, 

i -Ik (light reasonable people could come 
V) a reasonable agreement. It (litigation) is 
a failure Its a failure in cost of money, in 
cost of time, and it creates ill will When 
push comes to shove, in court, I think we'll 
win. but the legal process has to move," 
said Tornek. 

The $1.4 million bus garage would house 
26 new buses being provided to the UMass 
transit system by the federal government. 



i Mi-v -11^; scheduled to arrive sometime this 
month, according to Al Byam, operations 
fM.inaqer for ihe UMass Transit system. 
Ti«- deiriy ir' <>t)taining local approval for the 
|)r«»|ect may cause problems "We |ust want 
t(. o«'t them out of the snow." said Byam. 
h"|ht ruiw lieneficial occupancy (when 
ii»; buses could lie parked under a roof I is 
slated for December 15 It will most pro 
bably be extender! " said Byam. 

The new garage will have storage for 30 
l/iises.four maintenance bays, one 
automatic wash bay that can recycle 75 
percent of the watr'r used, a central 
di«;r) !•• • .1" a anrl a dnvrjr s lounge The 
' .. r\,(( e will priibab'v t.iM; ovr'r th»' 

ii'.iH'' tf" hfMiM! th< .i.t>r>(,l buses 

.1,1 new facility and added buses will 
enable UMass to expand bus service. Off 
campus bus service will t>e improved in the 
East Hadley Road area of Amherst where 
buses will run every ten minutes during the 
morning and afternoon and every twenty 
minutes during the middle of the day. The 
Fcfio HiM area and Orchard Valley area of 
Amhofst will receive service fol^ the first 
jiMie There will t>e nine trips a day to each 
of these sections Campus service will be 
modified Orchard Hill. Campus Shuttle, 
and the Stadium wrfl \ie combined into one 
route that six buses at a time will travel dur 
ing the day The new buses will be used 
when they arrive but there will be no ex 
panded service until they a'l arrive, ac 
cording to Byam. 



at A.J. Hastings 
neivsdealer and stationer 
4S S. Pleasant St. 
Amherst 




^Highlighting 

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Regency Hair Stylists 



189 Mo. Pleasant St. 
Amherst 
253-9526 



241 Main St. 

Northampton 
586-6262 



Conegian, 



Ex-champs: 

the "truth 'comes out 



'"' "*s(l.tv Aiigubi 9, 1978 



That Championship Season 

Mt Holyoke College Summer Theatre 

August 15 

By PHILIP MILSTEIN 

in which It IS revealed that 15 years can 
have quite an effect on people's lives 
Yeah. so>: we all knew that already But I 
didn t see this play (or any other) to learn 
any mafor philosophical psychological 
sociological insights tl get those every day). 
I went to be entertained And by that 



t point at the bu/^er), and thus never 
.1^'SHfved the trophy And that's the 

truth 

Yet somehow all the ranting and bit- 
terness IS forgiven, and everyone is happy 
Realistic? Who cares; it was, all in all, a lot 
of fun a few eternal time worn insights all 
driven home for the umpteenth times, a lit 
tie controversy and drama, a few laughs at 
the dated humor (the play was written 
nearly ten years ago by Tony winning 
Jason Miller, who in true Renaissance 
«.ish.on doubled as Best Supporting Oscar 




ARTs/TllEATRe 



criitfM Ihdt Champ/unship Season was 
rather successful 
The plot reads like a bad soap opera The 
1963 Pennsylvania high school basketball 
champions gather minus their star for a 
15 year reunion at the home of their belov 
ed Jew hating coach One by one they ar 
rive the wandering alcoholic, the rich 
soulless strip mining baron, the alkie's 
younger, (far) nx)re discipline brother, the 
blank eyed and laughing politician, and 
Coach Everything goes along lust hunky 
dory for awhile, until they have all downed 
a few. and little truths begin to spill For m 
stance, the politician's wife, in what may or 
may not have been a fund raising effort, is 
having an affair with the tycoon Or the 
younger Daly brother came to the aid of his 
death bed father while the older sibling 
drank his way across the country, falling 
on (his) ass in 10 cities,' as he himself so 
aptly put It The coach, it seems is 
sinless so far 

As will be the way every time grown men 
get together, get loaded, and get on each 
others' cases, the play (almost) ends m 
disaster The politician and the rich rrian 
apologi/e and ^cept (I forget who did 
which to whom), but the drunk who until 
then had been quite happy making smug 
wisecracks at each of the other 
four decides that after such a messy 
evening a happy ending is ill deserved So 
on he rails about the almighty "truth ' 
revealing that the reason the team's star 
has not beer, m touch with thp rnach over 
these lb years is because he was sore that 
the team accepted that first place trophy. 
He felt that because he was conveniently 
told by the coach to break the nbs of the 
opponent s star center that the team didn t 
rea/fy win the game (officially, they took by 



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Winner for his role as Father Karras m The 
Exorcist), lots of swearing and dirty jokes, 
and some cute chuckles at the hands of the 
drunk, who coincidentally was given (by 
Jack Neary) the only performance that rose 
above the semi professional Mt Holyoke 
College Summer Theatre Company tent. 
And I never asked for anything more 



2 Bedroom Garden Apartments 

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Get two Regular Roost Beef 
Sandwiches for one special 
pnce. Each sandwich is 
mode with slowcooked 
beef, sliced thin, and piled 
high. Arxi you get your 
choice of three tongy 
sauces. So every bite is 
|uicy, beefy, and ctelicious. 
Add some of our crisp. 



tasty fries and a soft drink, 
and your meal is deliciousiy 
complete. 

The next time you go 
to Hardees, take along 
someone you like. 
And take along this coupon. 
Ordei two Regular Roost 
Beef Sandwiches for $1.39. 
That s a |uicy deal. 



iM^'a^^i 



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GET TWO REGULAR 
. ROAH BEEF SANDWICHES 

FOR ^1.39. 

Good at all participating Hardees. Please present this coupon before ordering. 

One coupon per customer, please. Customer must pay any sales tax due 

on the purchase price. This coupon not good in combination with any other offers. 



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•Hit' s ot Haa;ey 
iOMiissf'll Stiopt 
M.t'l'i-v. Mr'iss 



Hardecj 



Coupon expires 



IM7H 



J^HilnHMiay, August 9, '978 



■Colle gi^Q h 



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Another 
^ va lue choice 
fro ipStop^ Shop 

[ECOHOIWVl '^^ 

mm^m Facial ^m^M 

Tissues .9/ 

Er^y sigmdcant savings on itutritious 
wholesome foods and servicaUe house- 
hokj products It price is important to you 
try Economy LaPet trom Stop & Shop 



self service deli ah the 

makings for great sandwiches 

MFratiks 

Extra Mild *, 

3potindpkgi 




^P^^ l Stop&ShopCoupon] i^l'^ [stop & Shop Coupon 

Aim tM COCO" ««) > S' M) n^coase c^^c^ ^^-~. tt«< *» coison «« tMiO pwC^w 

Stop & Shop ^^g Mrs. Filberts 
100% Pure ^^fe Golden ^ 

^^^ From codcentrute ^^>^i>^^ ^ ^ -=0 

^niiigettMarga- 
iiiceMB>rine 



Stop A Shop Coupon ^TJl'^^l'stop & Shop Coupon 



V Gallon 
cartcxi 



69 

«^X1 Mor^ A<X) T S^ Aog * J 

rrm ong pe* OOOWt 2S45 



I / lib package c 
/ / Otr b. sticks % 

1/ ^^ 



(juOO Mun A4JO ' S«l Kjii > .' 



2 



89 



\^£^. 



Dairy 




J IM«i tM cooor «<d • t7 90 puirKMi 

Nabisco 



Crackers 

12 ourx:e 
package 




«Mh »!• ccicon aid • (' SO mi rati 

^ Stop & Shop 
W 100% Natural 

P0tato 



liffeM^ 






Minute Maid 

Frozen-€oz. can 

Lemon 
•ade 

FREE 



Sweet & Scxjr Pickles rrr 99' 
Cold Cuts -^'.TSr^ '1.19 

Ratti Beet Franks ;5 '1.19 
ColonialBacon ^^:.''X »1.29 

comer deli Enjoy our spread 
of delicious dell looda. 
Avariable n stores featuring a service det 

Deutschmacher Cello 

Franks'p? 

Kahn's Braunschwieger T 99* 
American Cheese -'Sfl '1.^ 

Stop & Shop-Cooked 

Corned Beei 

3^* 



Save 20% on aU these 
^Great Beef ''Steaklmys! 

'Save 20% Versus Our Regular Retails as of Week ErKling July 29. 1978 •^ 

Chrcken of ttie Sea 

Onnil t lirtit 
Tuna 

59 




USDA Choice Beef. 1st. Cuts, Bone In 



ave 30V ^m^M^ 



Extra Lean 
Rat Cut 



Baked Ham 



•3.79 



Potato Salad «.*::?i.TS^ 49i 
Ham or Tuna Salad ^iS? M .99 
Stirimp Salad '2?:£r "2.59 
Vanilla Tapioca ^ISf 69* 
Comer Deli Rolls .r^r^To 75' 




ur kitchen 

All kinds of tasty 
foods from oiif chefs 



Fresh Cheese 

Pizza »°e' 99 



ChuckSte 

Regularly 99V Save 
USDA Choice Beef Round 

Tip Steak 

Regularly *2.59r Save80« 
USDA Choice Beef Steak 

Top Round f^s 

Regularly *2.59.> Save ea ^^ ■* 
USDA Choice Boneless Beef ^^ 

Chuck Steak149 

Regularly M.89r Save40v4^ '* 



mm 



'; 0-"s" 



Kraft-3202. jar 

^Oracle 
Whin 

iad An 

»ing a^aV 



Saiad 
Dressing 



Fresh Pizza 
Potato Salad 
Gelatins 






M.39 
49' 



SeatOOQ Good savings on fresh 
& frozen seafare 

Fresh Schrod 
Haddock'199 

Firm white fillets ^^L ■*> 

Fresh Cherrystone Clams 59. 
Fresh Blue Fish Fillets ' 1 .89 
Shnmp Salad Size . .. 2.59 

D3Kery Qii,iiitv from our ovens 

Butteiton 



USDA Choice Beef Chuck for London Broil 

Shoulder Steak '^67 

Regularly 2 09,, Save A2\ 
USDA Choice Beef Chuck 

169 



enoi.c«<-inoi «^<^ Decorated Plates JSiS 99' 
LjuncheonNa|M«»M2S'1 CoMCups fTSSi 99' 
SaranWrap 98- g Sfop&Shop 

Kraft Dinrw 1 XOttiatO 

Ketchup 





^Sm» ^L 



Viva Italian Dressing 69* 

Stewed Tomatoes 't-*^ 39* rr^^^'^'" o ..».». 
rJestteOuik rnsr- gg- K[attBarbeque Sauce*- 59' 



Cold Power 

iLaimiliy 
^tergent 

^29 



49oz 
box 




Sunshine 

ydrox 
•kies 

89 



Plain Rye Bread 
English Muffins 



'Itrx) A SV>P €m "rta*** 



»i*i«*£''.jiv fc o»Ci V6 



Stop & Shop-Top Slice 

Frankfurt 
RoUs4 °°°'l 



Cube Steak W 

Regularly 2.19 SaveSO; ^^ 
USDA Choice Beef Shell Loin 

Sirloin SteakV 

Regularjy ^2.59ir Save 60f ^^ 

1 



lb 



USDA Choice Boneless Beef 




Daisy Donuts " ' "rr.rz « "r^ 5Qt 
Louisana Ring ^r'^TT" 89* 

health & beauty aids 

Shampoo ^is^e^nU 89' 

Reg, Dry or Oily -702 bit. 

Noxzema 1.29 

Skin Cream- 10oz jar 
Ji\i.t(lU|Stopa Shop Coupon n^ 

Witti this couDOn 

SAVE 30' U 

2lb. package-Stop & Shop §:| 

Gravy and Sliced Beef ^| 

Cooked-Frozen 255^1 

5*y "^ *'*• ' ^« »»^ ' .' limit o««> IX. i,u»lo<n«i ' 



USDA Choice Beef Chuck 

Short Ribs 



Regularly M. 69. Save 40^ 



Windex Glass Cleaner irs 59* Marshmallows *,.>« 3'S;'1 
Trash Can Bags ^35. '199 Jelty Candies WST 32;89' 

frozen Oo/ens of freezer fiHers »cy awcK to f>n summer mea»s 

Birds Eye 

Tasti 



Fries 



Minute Maid 




Stokely Vegetables '-^ 79* Haddock Dinner .'"rx.?: 79' 

Taste 6seaSr].llr;i^r M IQ Macaroni & Cheese ^Sf 3? '109 
lasteubeabcaiiops 139 stuffed Cabbage '^.'.':::r '1 79 

Banquet Cookin Bags 3 .:. 89^ Wt Watchers Dinners .-.'1.19 

Mrs. Smith's 



-. SfMH, r'*f«ir«4L#*.'^ » .*' »^r-^v*" 



lt» 



Hendrie's 

ViX^aL Ice 
LCream 



'Assrd 
Flavors 



ctn 26 ounce pkg 
Florida Juice Bars 300'rS^i. 69' Eggo Waffles 







our produce stands 



Vv>if^ Jumbo M ^ ^^ 

^^^ / ^^_ ^California West Side ^^ mWk 

Ouitalouiie 69L 

"^ ^'^^ ^ Jumbo California ^ ^m ^^C 

Nectarines 49L 



'hrnHiirP jce Cream Cups »<7r*c^ 99' Morton's Pies .r*^^ 
TK. .^.K Cheese Pizza 'TST 99' Sara Lee Desserts " 

''^o.^:^^i?.rrnr Sicilian Ptzza ^. '1.69 ^4'.^^c£.y£^^!_-o^^; 



59' 

3U;89' 

•1.99 



J Cwcnw* ai»iwp ?i .o< (A« 



Oairy Get vour Stop& Stxjoworth of savings on all our fresh dairy foods 

Light N'Lively-Low Fat All Natural 

leese tfiUiosiiit 



OQUaSn Green or YeltowO »-s I ^QQ I '3nt Native Conn \JI\3k^ 

Cabbage "^'H^r 1 5: Fryer Peppers 39f 
Peppers "^'^^ 39i Savoy Cabbage 29: 




mimf ^S!!^^^^°^^^9m0 



Biscuits ««ur,8>«-«» 2*0*1125' Dragone Ricotta 
Cream Cheese 2.f«89' Swiss Cheese %"" 



'•1.59 




HADLEY-AMHERSTRoute9at the Hadley-Amherst Une.8a.m.-10p.m.,MorT.-Sat.We redeem your Federal Food Stamps. 



K^ 



■^^f 



Wprtnesdas. Augusts 197?? 



Wednesday, August 9, 1978 







The Sunrisers drum and bugle corps 
finished in first place in the 1978 Superfoowt 
of Music held last Saturday, in Alumni 
Stadium 

The drum and Dugie Lompetition. spon 
sored by the Fine Arts Center and the 
UMass Departments of Dance and Music, 
raised funds for the UMass Bands Equip- 
ment Fund and the Belchertowvn State 
School Friends Association The associa 
tion IS dedicated to the aid of the mentally 
retarded at the Belchertown State School. 

According to superbowi coordinator 
Jean McKay, the Superbowl of Music is an 
event that "we (the university) would like 
to bring here yearly" adding that ' people 
9X9^ waiting to see how it does this year." 
Saturday's competition was the fifth 
Superbowl in a series begun in 1972. The 
last Superbowl was held in 1975 

The Sunrisers, a national champion tiand 
from Long Island, New York, finished 
ahead of the Matadors of Providence, 
Rhode Island. In third place were the Hur- 
ricanes of Shelton, Connecticut. The Buc- 
caneers of Reading, Pennsylvania and the 
Les Ambassadors of Quebec, Canada 
finished fourth and fifth. 

THOMAS MAJOR 



p^iCii/« 



Mmk$nt Ckkni$ h§^ 



92 Main St. 

•fresh Chines* 

V«g«tabl«s from our 

OMm Farm 
•Fully Air CondHlonod 
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$1 15 8 Up 

H^^U quality food at a reasonable price 
■RHConimended by The New York Times' 




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selecting the hoircut 
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( Tues & Wed only 

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witr> this c oupon 

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( Next to Bell's Piiia) 

C«li fsr appt. 549-S«10 



iOt4<£DKEN* 



Coming Soon! 

REGISTRATION FOR FALL '78 
at Continuing Education, UMass/.Amherst 



EVENING COLLEGE COURSES: 

August 14 - Early registration begins 
August 23 - In-person registration begins 

UNIVERSITY DAY COURSES: 
August 23-26 

CREDIT-FREE WORKSHOPS: 

Registrations accepted now through September 25 

The University of Massachusetts is available to yor through the 
Division of Continuing Education. 

For information and a catalog, call (413) 54^-3653. We accept 
VISA, Master Charge, and American Express. 






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nmHERST's 
#1 HfiPPY HOUR 

MON - FRI 4pm - 7pm 
WED 4pm - Closing 

Come for a drink 

Stay for dinner 

"IT'S WHERE 

THE ACTION IS" 

Corner 
University Dr. h Amity St. 



■coiiggian 



By DON LESSER 



A review of Rot}ert Nadeau's Guide to 
Boston Restaurants may seem a little out of 
place here in Western Mass., but there are 
several good reasons to own the book. One 
of the best, of course, is that Boston is the 
nearest city of any size and you may well 
find yourself in Beantown with a yen for 
linguica or scrod and little or no knowledge 
of where to find such things. Nadeau will 
tell you where to find every ethnic and 
specialty cuisine that the city offers and he 
will do It in a witty, concise, informative 
and accurate way. For this reason alone, 
the book will prove invaluable 

Another very qood leason to own 
Nadeau's guide is the introduction that 
precedes each chapter. The book is divided 
into ethnic and sp€K:ialty chapters and 
Nadeau offers a little guide to each style. 
The chapters include such diverse con- 
siderations as' Chinese political history (to 
explain Mandarin cuisine), seasons for local 
tish or current food politics In an attempt 
to explain hippy food, Nadeau is compelled 
to discuss |unk foods, late 1960's political 
history and nuclear power. You will pro- 
bably agree yvith his opinions, on food as 
well as restaurants, but he states his opi 
nions with enough clarity for you to make 
an informed decision based on your tastes. 

Nadeau. for those of you who do not read 
The Real Paper, (Boston's equivalent to 
The Village Voice or the LA. Free Press), is 



mea/ 



one of the seminal food critics for the cur- 
rent Boston scene He is immensely 
readable, though he can be witty at the ex- 
pense of accuracy, and he does know the 
Boston restaurant scene as well as 
anybody. Besides, the book makes you 
hungry and that's one of the goals of food 
writing, isn't it? The book is $3.95 from 
World Food Press and is available at the 
University Bookstore as well as elsewhere. 



To know how to eat out successfully, 
one should be able to read a menu so as to 
eliminate probably canned or frozen items 
and to catch local and season delicacies. 
One should know how to talk to a waiter or 
waitress remember they are human be- 
ings, be polite and ask them what's good. 
And one should know how to send food 
back. 

Restaurants are not in the business to 
send out bad food and the majority of them 
will not knowingly send out truly bad food. 



but they do make mistakes and they 
sometimes will take a chance on something 
questionable on the probability that no one 
will know or care. If you do notice 
something bad about your fodd, send it 
back. It will only spoil your evening to eat 
something miscooked, spoiled or that is not 
what you ordered and it will only encourage 
cooks in the belief that the public doesn't 
know good food from bad. But there is a 
right way and a wrong way to return a dish 
and doing it right will avoid unpleasant- 
ness Most people are afraid to send 
something back because they do not want 
to make a scene or they are afraid that 
unspeakable atrocities will be practiced 
upon their meal in the kitchen Nonsense. 
Follow a few simple guidelines and you can 
forget every restaurant horror story you 
have ever heard. 

1) Be sure If you have spent 15 minutes 
changing your order, your serving person 
may be understandably confused. 
Likewise, be reasonably sure that th.if odd 



taste is not an unfamiliar spice before you 
complain. If something is burnt, raw, spoil- 
ed, rancid or not what you ordered, you 
have good grounds for refusing to eat it. 

2) If there's something wrong with it, 
don't eat it. Unless you have discovered a 
'oreign object in the course of eating, a 
'tistaurant has every right to wonder why 
you ate ¥* of it if your meal was so bad. 
One or two bites should be enough to 
determine rancidity. 

3) Be polite. You may very well be angry 
that your beef stroganoff arrived with 
curdled sour cream, but a polite, I'm 
afraid there's something wrong with this 
stroganoff, " gets much better response 
than, "I won't eat this crap, " followed by a 
plate crashing to the floor. Be polite, be 
firm (often an- attempt will be made to con- 
vince you that this is how the dish is always 
made. Decide for yourself). If your serving 
person becomes at all abusive, ask for the 
manager. He or she will be concerned 
**nough with public relations to avoid any 



Food 



77i7 afraid there's something wrong with 
this stroganoff/ gets much better response 
than, 7 won't eat this crap, ' followed by a 
plate crashing to the floor. 



«r 



ROGER E ABRAMSON PRESENTS 



JfiHfitCAN 

mimt 




SUNOAT 
JUICIIST20 



BURNING SPCRR 

TOOTS RND TH€ 

MAVTRLS 

MAX AOMCO 

46 SO «0V M 0«V O SMOOU 

COUNTRY COMFORT. N. HAMPTON; 

RECORD TOWN HADLEV 
CHANGES AT THE X, SPRINGFIELD, 
FACES OF EARTH, AMHERST. 
MUSIC INN BOX OFFICE 



mcifVf Ui* 4OOIII1M0 

»foi<«viio^ _^ 

• oo* i»^ * •»€•»•€« o« •••• 'O*** %ijt««« iro 



Music 




CLASSIFIEDS 



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Apt viMrnad !»/1 $175 Fern olde 



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Clip and Save 




>>°**"'^ 







Aug 6 5 00 $7 00 *Adv $8 00 day of show 

DAVID BAOMSCAG BAND 

mXOOH UIATCAS / N€UI 

COMMAND€A CODV BAND 

BONNK AAin 

<<&!?? SOO i ? bO " tny Vfl SO r)«v o shcxju 

INC OUTLAUJS 

'.«PT i? 8 M t7 SO rtOV M SO^^v O SMOU) 

UIAVION iCNNINGS 
J€SSI€ COITCA 

• ■ ' . $J » / so 'V)v M so "^'^v O SmOu/ 



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B< ".'All "if ".O I f H '■' If Ml « 
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ATLANTIC PRESENTATIONS 




Oanskin 



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unpleasantness. If they become abusive, 
leave at once and file a complaint with the 
Better Business Bureau Telling them off 
may provide momentary satisfaction but a 
complaint will help correct the mistake in 
the first place 
So if a dish arrives miscooked, raw or 
burnt or with rancid or stale odors, send it 
back politely. You wilt not have your even- 
ing ruined, you will let the cooks Know that 
p>eople can detect bad food and will not eat 
It and you will improve the situation for 
everybody. 



NoricEs 




1M Mm.Ui. 
Downtown Amherst 



FREE MOVIE 

The India Association will present the 
movie "Hare Rama, Hara Krishna, " on 
Saturday, August 12, at 7 p.m. in Cam- 
pus Center, Room 163. For more in- 
formation, call Surenbre at 545-2707 
from 9 to 6, or at 546-1075. 



- ADULT ENTERTAINMENT 

Majestic Clnwna 

84 Cottage Street (Rte. 141) 

Easthampton, Massachusetts 01027 

Tel 527 2346 

French class matea 7:30 

Judgement day 6:80 

Air conditioned 
under ai not admitted 



BRANDYWINE 

at Amherst 

Moving off campus? 



'! .'-^'i/lr.^ 



• 1 bedroom 
starting at $240 
2 bedrooms 
starting at $300 
Gas utilities 
included 

• Rental Office 
open: 
Weekdays 9 5 

•On UMass 
bus route 
every 10 min. 




vi%m 



v:x\ 



.1 



I I!. .J 



iFH^ iT 



mxvf 





50 Meadow Street 
North Amherst 549-0600 




V 



s C-olk- ^icU) 




Wednesday, August 16, 1976 



1 iitj Mount Hui 


yiinf v.iJiicyB 


Siinimpr Theatrn 


w(H prosent 


ire's 1 


'Two 


-^.i- !i of V, . .... today 

through Saturday. August 19. in th« 


H- '.i t.,' i' 




1 riM M<JU(i t <-! 




Sumrrwf Thedtrt i 




♦ rMays wvilh 


a Shakcspoar* 


1 m For Ui 


id fo. 




r ROGER E 



Daiiy Suiiiu 
Sfyf(i(i/s 

Sand'uuches 
f rc.sh y'o^M/r/ 
Smnaihios 
Bagek and Spreads 
Baked Goods 

Homemade 
and Always Fresh 



at Faces next to the Amherst Post 

Office 

Vhours: 8 00 5 00 256-6955 V 




SUNDAT 
JUICUST 10 
):>OPM 



OURNING SPCDR 

TOOTS RND TH€ 

MRVTflLS 

MAX ROM€0 

l<s so HDV M ORV O SHOUJ 

COUNTRY COMFORT N HAMPTON 

RECORD TOWN HADLEY 
CHANGES AT THE X, .'SPRINGFIELD 
FACES OF EARTH, AMHERST 
MUSIC INN BOX (IFFirp 



TiWETRCJN 



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PC ■■ 

iHi . . .! ... I ^. . 

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DRV1D BAOMBCRO BRNO 

MUDDV UIRTCRS / N€UJ 

COMMRN0€A COOV BRNO 

BONNK RRITT 
AtU*^ •! ihe Wheel 

TN€ bUTlRUiS 

UJflVLON iCNNINGS 
J€SSI€ COlTCft 



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iff: 

ATLANTIC PRESENTATIONS 




Wedne sday. Augus t 16. 1978 , 



Charged wjth^ q^if tin Q^ 



ill^Miiiii 



SGA president to be arraigned 

Hk ^||M||||||^ f^ Bv MARK I FrrP'ifi i- u:. _ ^^ 




Robert Dion 



ByMARKLECCESe 

Student Government Association Co 
President and Student Trustee Robert Dion 
will be arraigned in Hampshire District 
Court next Wednesday and charged with 
shoplifting from the University Store 

Dion will be charged with stealing a pen, 
valued at $3.98, from the store on Monday! 
August 7, according to the Student At 
lorney General Jon Hensleigh. 

Dion said that he has hired a lawyer, but 
had no further comment on the arraign 
ment. 
Impeachment proceedings are being con 
sidered against Dion by some members of 
the SGA. according to fHensleigh. 

"They feel that astudent leader, such as 
the CO president and trustee, who has 
been caught shoplifting will be incapable of 
properly executing his power on the board 
of trustees and as a student leader. It's a 
matter of ruined credibility," said 
Hensleigh. 

"On the other hand." he said, "this may 
not be true. A shoplifting offence, because 
of the size and calibre of the cnme. may not 
inhibit his performance as president at all. " 
"It may be difficult to argue that shoplif- 
ting is an impeachable offence, because of 
the pettiness of the crime." said Hensleigh, 
"I don't think it's an impeacable offence " 
Dion said Monday. 
Dion serves as SGA co-president with 
Don Bishop. The pair was elected in a SGA 
electoral convention last spnng, after a 
popular election in which no candidate 
received enough votes to be declared the 
winner. 



In his dutiuu i;. CO president. Dion also 
serves as the student member on the 
UMass Boaro of Trustees from the 
Amherst campus 

According to SGA rules, if one member of 
an elected team resigns or is removed from 
office, both members of the team 'nust 
resign. This means that if Dion resigns or is 
removed, then Bishop must vacate the 
presidency also 

A new presidential election could be held 
in the beginning of October, when elec 
tions for Student Senate are held, ac 
cording to Marcy Levington, cahirperson of 
the SGA s governmental Affairs Commit- 
tee 

Dion did not comment on whether or not 
he would resign. 

The SGA constitution does not state what 
IS considered an impeachable offence 

The SGA impeachment process goes 
through two steps first, the Student 
Senate must pass an impeachment motion 
by a simple majority. 

After the president has been impeached, 
he must be tried by an Impeachment 
Board, which consists of nine justices of 
the Student Court system and three per 
sons appointed by the Speaker of the 
Senate. 

A three fourths vote of this board is reced- 
ed for conviction and if the president is 
convicted, he is removed from office. 

The Constitution also states that if there is 
a vacancy in the office of the presidency, 
the Speaker of the Senate acts as acting 
president until an election can be heW The 
Speaker of the Student Senate is presently 
Brian DeLima. 




Jon Hensleigh 



Fall enrollment predicted to exceed last year's 

i\j I A I IDA I^ChlAIC\/ . . _ • 



By LAURA KENNEY 

A total enrollment figure of 24,450 is ex 
pected at UMass this fall, which is 497 
students above last year's enrollment, ac- 
cording to an Institutional Studies report 

Alison A Cox, a research assistant in In 
stitutional St.idies. said. "We are predic 
ting 19,200 undergraduates and 5,250 
graduates this year. Last fall, there were 
18,840 undergraduates and 5.113 
graduates enrolled." 

However, admissions orficials disagree 
with the projected figures .saying that they 
1 < exagerated Assistant Dean of Admis 
sions J'inri Cfiinn sfnd that 4,256 freshman 
have bHHfi HdfMitter* . 'which is about 200 
more than last year. The Institutional 
Studies report stated that 4.560 freshman 
are expected, and that 4,469 freshman 
matriculated last fal'. 

But William E. Cicia, a staff assistant m 
the registrar s office, said. as of now, 
there are no definite figures for enrollment! 
not until alt the no shows are accounted 
for, after the add drop period about the 



third week in September, will we have any 
definite figures. 

After last fall's housing crisis, in which 
about 400 new students entered the univer 
sify and found that they had no housing 
assignments, a housing task force was set 
up to research tfie housing system and 
recommend solutions for future situations. 
Last fair, many students were temporarily 
placed in the Campus Center Hotel, frater 
nities and sororities. By the end of the 
semester several students remained m the 
hotel while the rest moved into dorm rooms 
or lounge space in dorms that was con« 
verted into livmy space 

Junior Exemption 

According to Acting Director of Residen 
tial Resource Management Robert Camp 
bell, "We do not at this point anticipate 
problems. He said that the exemption of 
juniors from the on camjius housing re 
quirement. which was adopted this year, 
will alleviate the problems of last year, and 
that the dorm capacity has been evaluated 
so that a maximum amount of space will be 
used Several single sex floors have been 




transformed into coed floors for example. to 
compensate for the larger numtjers of male 
studentsmatriculating 

Campbell said that 2,800 juniors were sent 
letters over ttie summer asking them to 
return cards saying .• ifiey would be 

living on or ofl car , n the fall Of 

These. 400 cards were returned stating that 

that the • ' "' 

and 800 .. 

would laready nave been exempted from 

the housing requirement as a result ^* ^-^ 

ing commuters 

CcT said that .r . students 

who .... ned cards ut^:. .-, ttiaw thev 
would live on campus and the WQ that 
did not • 1 be "^< 

the dorn ih, long 

paid their pills on timf> " He said that 
there is space for all freshman and 
sophmoies. and that they will also get 
room assignments if they have po") 
their bills by the due date of August 1 1 
According to the Institutional Studies 
report, 7,880 out of the 1 1 080 beds on 
campus are xpected to be filled by 
freshmen sophmores, and 

Stockbridge students, leaving ,200 
beds to be filled by uppercl,'»«;s 
students 

A staggered opening of schoj 
(•■en institutMl this year whereby 

lents can move ir S • "^^ t 
jre continuing studc 
.int to make sure the new students. 
<jet settled before the others, ' Camp 
bell said 

Off Campus Housing 
Meanwtiiie, th*,- off campus Hoiistrin 
Office has been bnmm.ng ever\ 



with students looking foi places to 
live Off Campus Housing Coordinator 
Joanne R. Lsvw^on said that about 
10.000 students will be living off 
campus this year , which is about 
average, but the proWem this year is 
thai juniors were not notified until the 
middle of th€ suinmer that they we^e 



!f.;<t. 



i'i 



Its. sw:h as 
. *ieen exwtipt -urn 
t 
the 

.;.-.„, -..•11 t)ad. .;.i.., J i-vn' 
enou«" housing, in terms of 



1.-. 'vs get What they want 

The op<^"";i<js in Amhf st jrt; 'ew 
and and vi v expensu*' students end 
up paying r. rough the teeth. Levenson 
said. ' People are going to tje living 
three to M loom to cut down on ex- 
i end up duplicating 

More peofile are renting out rooms in # 

houses than ever before, she said A 

lot of OfTiple are also renting out places 

'•s hke Florence or Greenfield, 

■f xt i.ipnts don't want to live 

Kf fber< 



This IS The last issue of the Sum- 
mer Colltigian The Collegian will 
publish Its Back to School issue 
on September 5. and resume dai- 
ly publication on September 6. 



D.A. investigates 
missing CC account funds 



By MARK LECCESE 

University officials have confirmed 
that the Hampshire County District 
Attorney's Office is lo'^king into the 
disappearance of $15,246.82 from 
the accounts of Campus Center 
Cnnff?rpnce Services last summer. 

The University was refunded the 
money by Fidelity and Deposit of 
Maryland, under an insurance policy 
c.iHed hy Fidelity and Deposit 
"Blanket Crimp Policy." 

The proof of loss statement from 
ttii; company stated that "during the 
period of May 1. 1976 throuqh Jan. 
31, 1977, various Campus Center 
cash leceipts at the Amherst campus 
for Summer Conference Housing 
and Confinence Fees and eApenses 
were received and recorded as 
receijUs hutr were not accounted for 
in 'If Campus Center's bank 



donr 



<" any other fund balan 



I lis Vice President for 
Management George Kalidis last 
week said. he m, rials on • le 

loss have b i turnea over to the 
district attorney's office. It is out of 
the University's hands." 

The district attorney last week had 
no comment 

The person who was manager of 
Crjnffjrence Services at the time, 
Donald Witkowski. has announced 
his resignation, but. according to 
C.imj-uis Center Assistant Director 
Bernard Wilkes, Witkowski's 
resignation has nothing toi do with 
the investigation. 

"As far as I know. I don t think it 
has anything to do with it," Wilkes 
said last week Witkowski has been 
an employee of UMass for nine 
years, and he had been offered 
another job teaching, according to 
Wilkes. 



? Cojjr^ian, 



I Wednesday, August 16, 1978 



proj 



Summer in Whit mo re: 



is anybody happy i 



? 



BvKNUTEFORUe 

While strolling across the Whit 
more parking lot the other day, I was 
stopped by a man getting out of a 
dark green Mercedes convertible. 
"Hey, son" he shouted, "come 
her« " Looking at his Massachusetts 
license plate MONEY I' and his 
three piece Brooks Brothers suit. I 
quickly determined that he wasn't 
my father but for twenty percent of 
his wallet content I would gladly be 
his Reni a Kid. 

Yes Pop, what sup^" I responded. 
"Who do I talk to about giving 
fnoney to the University ■'" he asked 
I'm in a rush and need to talk to the 
man in charge." 

You want to fliv« moiiev tc U 

M.iss'"; • • ■'.•.'• , 

..) tor i 
No, It s niy sister 

'"*'■ '.■■■:• ' •.- iM'iivj for 

No, Mty -.liU-i die*J a* Hi instructed 

to I. ,jv»- or ,• .n.tiuxi .Jollars to the 
" 'jti»»i,i • U Mass who is 

<ny of that species 
'esponded 'No one hete is 

■in-uv .«nd the highest ranking of 
f trial s that guy tn the green uniform 
over t'.ere tn that 'ittle iKKJth " I said, 
point ^f| to th«* cop guarding the 
n.irkini lot from invasion by Cuban 
"i>ops 'I don t thir'k he's happy 
tftther. so I guess you're going to 
have to keep the money yourself " 

'Hell no, " he shouie<1, "she left me 
four million and even with income 
averaging the next rmllion has got to 
go Hey don t w ilk away, I've got 
this list of people where is the 
President Dr Knapp?" 

He s not here, and never has been. 
But he ought to be happy. The 
University is paying him $50,000 a 
year to run things from Cornell," I 

«iid 

Well, what about this guy 
Bfomery? I'll give the money to him." 
He's in Africa, but even if he was 
here he wouldn t be happy, " I said 

You see, the trustees didn t think he 
! ould handle being president so he 
A(»»nt to South Africa to help form a 
I'ansition government over there I 
'•'irik you're out of tiirl- 



"Now wait a minute," my new 
found friend said What about the 
vice chancellors, Madson, McBee or 
Allen? One of them must be here and 
happy" 

'Sorry ", I answered. "Madson is in 
Colorado and wont be here until 
school starts. If he gets here late 
enough and misses the housing crisis 
he ought to be happy, though, 
McBee is here and I think he's happy, 
but he's happy because he won't be 
here when school starts. He's leaving 
for West Virginia. Allen may be your 
man, I said, "he s as happy as 
hoola hoops to be here, but they are 
searching for his position. I guess 
you might say he s only acting- 
h.ippy 

"^"^ '■' io to the Alumni Of 
■'•d, "but their director 
left iim V. liiv.'isity last montn and his 
replacement was so happy to get the 
|ol> that he went to Germany for a 
whi'i- 

"f ne said m obvious 

dts.ippoinimeiif 'Tt i .ho 

see ' 

Well, III. It wouiu be the bursar. " I 
s*ik1 "But when I paid my bill last 
semester, he lost it. I tf\ink he's hap 
py, iHJt he doesn't know why and if 
he s here it's only from the neck 
flown But, hell, if he lost my tuition 
think of what might happen to your 
million." 

That's incredible." the man said. 
No ones here and no ones happy. 
Who makes decisions around here?' 

' That s easy," I said. "Dunno the 
summer when no one is here 
everyone makes decisions, and that's 
why no one is happy." 

My God, I couldn't have picked a 
worse time to corrie to U Mass. I'll 
have to come hack later" he said as 
he climt>ed b^ck into his car. 

Well, sir, to be perfectly honest 
with you. you could have chosen a 
worse time, " I said. 
"When IS that'' 

■ During the school yea'." I said. 
Everyone is here, no one is happy 
and no one makes decisions. It's a 
lottafun." 



,Knute Forue /ust can't seem to 
graduate 




A member of the Little River Band performs , during a free 
concert last Wednesday, sponsored by the Union Program Council. 
Several hundred people attended the event, which also featured 
the George T. Gregory Band. (Photo by Laura Kennfty) 



On the cover 

A sampling of the crowd in attendance at last week's concert 
soak up the .un by the campus pond, knowing that in just 
a few weeks they will be waiting in lines and sitting 
in classrooms as classes begin Sept. 6. . 



NoricES 



Pam Bricker and Reed Butler will 
shcv.vcase their new act tonight .it 8 m Nor 
tha- i! Look Park s Pino-i Theater. 

V- .ms will also perfo'm light ja// as 

part jt this outdoor mini-concert 

The show is being produced by NEMT 
(New England Musicians Technicians) a 
newiy formed group of local musicians and 
concert technicians, in conjunction with 
the Hampshire Neighborhood Center 

I* enough support ts shown, NEMT hopes 

o fi'oduce ti weekly Wednesday night 
show at Look Park featuring the Valley's 
fMJSt talent 

To defray expenses, NEMT reguests a $2. 
donation, part of which will benefit the 
Hampshire Neighborhood Center's 
emergency food fund. 

Come at view Valley music at its best. Bi 
ing ^ I'Unket and re live the summer of 
lovt' 



MASHED POTATOES 

Ongir.jl comedy tunny stuff wiM Ue per- 
<orn»ed Friday, Aug. 18 at the C.iy Studio in 
Northampton and Saturrlay, Aug 19at Main 
Street Center in Northampton, Boith shows 
willbe«at8 30p.m., andthereisa$2donation 



M ASSACHUSITIS 3UMr/,tR 



\ 



n 



T 



A 



■ftltOf 



LAURA M KENNEY 



MARK A LECCESE 
LAUR C WOOD 





It's Here Now! 

REGISTRATION FOR FALL '78 
at Continuing Education, UMass/Amherst 



EVENING COLLEGE COURSES: 

August 14 - Early registration begins 
August 23 - In-person registration begins 

UNIVERSITY DAY COURSES: 
August 23-26 

CREDIT-FfREE WORKSHOPS: 

Registrations accepted now through September 25 

The University of Massachusetts is available to you through the 
Division of Continuing Education. 

For information and a catalog, call (413) 545-3653. We accept 
VISA, Master Charge, and American Express. 




Wednesday, Au>j st 16. 1978 ^ 



iCoile gran 3 



UMass 



By LEE BURNETT 

Contrary to figures made public last 
week by Rep. Francis W. Hatch Jr., 
candidate for the Republican 
nomination for governor, UMass is 
not a tax delinguent according to 
state and university officials. 

The state Department ot Revenue 
lists showed that at the end of May, 
5,824 businesses owed the com- 
monwealth $36.5 million in unpaid 
sales and meals taxes. The UMass 
dining commons reportedly owed a 
total of $644,093.09, with Franklin, 
Berkshire, Worcester, and Hamp- 
shire dining commons owing 
$187,569.56, $176,311.10, $157,967.48, 
and $122,244.95 respectively. 

The figures in guestion were the 
subject of a court case that found 
UMass exempt from meals tax 
through January I, 1978. Alan Breen 
principal tax examiner, explained the 
probable discrepancy: "After a deci- 
sion comes down it has tobeabated, a 
process that takes seven months." 

The suit, brought last year by the 
University against the now defunct 
Department of Corporations and 
Taxation, tested whether the meals 
tax applied to state colleges and 



Over $644,000 in taxes was reportedly 
owed by four campus dining commons, 
but officials say UMass is exempt 
as a result of a court case. 



universities. The University's posi- 
tion, according to a University 
spokesperson, was that the Universi- 
ty, not having billed students for a 
meals tax, was a taxpayer to the 
Commonwealth and "that didn't 
make sense." Suffolk Superior Court 
upheld this position and exempted 
UMass from all alledged in- 
debtedness up to January I, 1978 

Since the I940's the Department of 
Corporations and Taxation has tried 
to collect taxes on meals from col- 
lege dining commons and was 



stymied up through the I970's 
Several years ago Harvard University 
was told to pay and did. This led to a 
discrepancy whereby the private col 
leges in the state were collecting and 
UMass and some other state schools 
were not. 

In the meantime, I.ep. James G. 
Collins, D Amherst co sponsored 
legislation that would explicitly ex 
empt all students from a meals tax. 
The intent of a meals tax is that peo 
pie pay taxes on food eaten m a 
restaurant but not bought m a super 
market and eaten at home Collins 



said, "When students come to the 
University they have to buy meal 
tickets often without any choice. For 
nine months of the year the dining 
commons, in effect, becomes their 
home. They shouldn't pay a tax on 
food eaten there." This legislation 
was unsuccessful at the time. 

In last year's budget battle the 

Mw^islature attached a rider to the 

I 'I'f'Mi that reduced the meals tax 

' 1 percent to six percent, as 

• January I, 1978 This placed the 

iieals tax in the category of a sales 

ax for which the University became 
liable. Students were billed six per 
cent tax on their board fees and paid 
this last semester. According to a 
University spokesperson, this money 
has been paid to the state. Collins 
said the change from a meats tax to a 
sales tax, even though it was deemed 

"unfair (to students) the reason why 
it was kept the Commonwealth need 
♦;d the revenue, amounting to $16 19 
million " 

This year Collins and company 
prevailed and students are again ex 
empt as of July I, 1978 Asa result in 
serts were included with semester 
bills instructing students to deduct 
the tax from their total bills 



rCLASSIFIEDS' 

ForRmnt 

Rent a mini refrigerator for summer, 
poolside, patio, summer home $10 a montfi 
plus tax Spint Haus Refrigerator Rentals" 
338 College St Open 10 a m. 11 p.m. Dai 
ly 256 8433 or 253 5384. 



ForSmtm 

Women's 5 speed bicycfe used 
semester $45 00 Call 256 8989 Glenn 



1 



Large Quantities of Ice Available Ice or 

Blocks Spirit Haus Liguors 338 College St 
Open 10 a m 11 p.m. daily 256 8433 or 
263 5384 

RCA Color TV 21" screen $85 Oval 
shaped braided rug 13' X 9' $20 Both m 
good conditior.. 253 7782 

~ H0tp Wanted 



Addressers wanted immediately! Work 
at home no experience neccesary 
excellent pay Write American Service 
8350 Park Lane. Suite 127, Dallas. TX 

75231 

Wanted 

Apt wanted 9/1 $175 Fem"orderc o Col 

l egian 

Personal 

Stick it in your ear we'll pierce them free 
it you buy the studs Silverscape Designs 
264 N Pleasant st. Amherst 253 3324 



-' — '— — ' — '_ — ■— — _v — ■_■ — i — l__(_, ,_ 



Che-Lumumba offers education 
from a Third World perspective 



By CHERYL CZERNIAK 

Mommy teaches Spanish! Daddy teaches 
music! Your history lesson gives George 
Washington a t)ack seat to Malcolm X and 
Fidel Castro. 

This is elementary school for Adriana 
Bohm, Nataka Craton, and about 8 other 
children who attend the Che- Lumumba 
school. 

The alternative school, which makes its 
home in the New Africa House at UMass, is 
accredited by the Amherst Public School 
system and serves students between the 
ages of six and 10. 

The school teaches the same sudjects 
taught in conventional grade schools said 
Robert Bohm, whose daughter, Adriana, 
attends the school. 

The difference , he said, lies in the em- 
phasis. The Che-Lumumba school looks at 
life from a Third World perspective, seeing 
the world as divided into classes of people. 
Strong emphasis is placed on the history 
and development of the Third World coun- 
tries and the local Third WorHd community. 
Spanish, for example, which is not offered 
until the eighth or ninth grade in most 
public schools, is a regular part of the Che- 
Lumumba curriculum. 






CbequeK5 5aloon 

Amherst, Massachusetts 



flmHERST's 
#1 HfiPPY HOUR 

MON - FRI 4pm - 7pm 
WED 4pm - Closing 

Come for a drink 

Stay for dinner 

"IT'S WHERE 

THE ACTION IS" 



Corn er 
Dr. & Am ity St 



In the past, the students at Che-Lumumba 
have taken field trips to Sturbridge Villiage, 
a factory and a jail, Bohm said. Although 
these trips are similar to the escapades of 
other grade schoolers, he said the Che- 
Lumumba students are taught to examine 
factors like racial repercussions of life p>or 
trayed at Sturbridge or the effects of the 
factory conditions on the workers. 

Parents play an active role in the educa- 
tion of their children at the six year old 
school. Along with one full-time teacher, 
parents are called on to play roles such as 
administrator, teacher, or fundraiser. 
Parents have taught subjects like Spanish, 
music, dance and carpentry. 

The Che-Lumumba school, Bohm said, 
stresses the mastering of basic academic 
skills such as reading and writing. In this 
way, he said, students graduating from 
Che-Lumumba can easily adjust to 
academic life at conventional schools. 

Bohm explained that the school even uses 
the standardized exams given in tradi 
tionalpublic schools, to test the academic 
acheivements of the Che-Lumumba 
students. Bohm said however that the 
school's teachers and administrators realize 
the cultural limitations of the tests. 

Student at Che- Lumumba do not receive 
grades. Instead their grade reports consist 
of letters to the parents evaluating their 
performances. 

Accurate and useful evaluations are made 
possible through the highly individualized 
attention Che-Lumumba offers its 
students, said Anthony Craton, father of 



Nataka, another pupil at the school 

Craton explained that there are no 
separate classrooms for different grades 
but the children are still taught on different 
levels according to their performance. 

The student population at the Che- 
Lumumba school averages about 10 each 
year, said Craton. The school will accept 
children from all racial and ethnic 
backgrounds. Bohm said, however "we try 
to maintain a healthy racial balance." 
Bohm defined this as more Third Wortd 
children than white. 

The annual operating expenses of the 
alternative school, Craton said, total bet- 
ween $12,000 and $15,000. To raise this 
money, fundraisers such as concerts, (jar- 
ties and tag sales are held Donations are 
also collected from various organizations. 

In addition, tuition to the school is charg- 
ed. The amount is bases on the parents 
ability to pay. Craton estimated that the 
parents pay t)etween $25 and $100 each 
year although there are no set maximum or 
minimum fees. Craton said the school does 
not receive any financial assistance from 
UMass. 

The institutions name, Che-Lumumba, is 
a combination of the first and last names of 
two Third World leaders. Che Guevera, an 
ally of Fidel Castro, led a revolt in Bolivia. 
Patrice Lumumba was the first prime 
minister of the Congo. He declared the 
country independant from Belgium in 1961 . 

Craton said this name was chosen "to 
foster student identification with world 
leaders that are associated with the Third 
World " 





2 Bedroom Garden Apartments 



From 



INCLUDES 

HEAT & HOT 

WATER 




FAMILY BUILDING NOW AVAILABLE 

Brittany nanor 

Take first entrance to oor rental office, located «1 tf.6 A-i Bnttarry Manor Dnw* Remai 
Mourt Mmi fr-. 9.5 Sat 10-2 



East Hadl«y Rd., Amherst 



256-8534 



CoUegian 




LoJllLIOTliiEdiTOR 



Wednesday. August 16 WTB 



WO .d< uf . ^6b'»«»''*'" 



■% 



To The Editor: 

^/»f V,tamm by Jamce Eggleston 

of The Collegian was tilled w,th m- 
nacuraces and m.s.nformavon The 
Undersigned mt-mbers of the Deoan 
rpent of Food Science anT Nutntl 
'eel compelled to respond as fo/lovZ 



I Slating that one vitamin is more impor 
tant than any other vitamin is misleading 
All vitamins are essentia/ to good health 
with deficiencies resulting m disease states. 

2 The Vitamin b complen ,s not a single 
vitamin, but a group of several vitamns 
rhese vitamins are grouped togt-f , 
because lai they are water soluble Jm 
they ser . vmes which mearys that 

'''*''*" ' ^peofic emyme or en 

zvme systems to cataiyie the mynad of 
chemiCii' ••■ ' • ,/ 

Th^ B ''^f^ 

... • with 

ajfferen, ^,stf, buttons m different foods ana 
do not necessarOy act together as a umt m 
the metabolic processes. 



Vitamin B article corrected 



i^l4>f9a ^4> ^ffj^: 




MCAT 

LSAT 

GMAT 

PCAT 

OCAT 



NMB 
I, II, III 

ECFMG 
FLEX 



VAT / NLE 




5temfiey-H. 

KflPMN 

Educational Center 

Call Days EveninKS & Weekends 

264 N. Pleasant St. 
Amherst, Mass. 

4132535108 



MCAT class begins 



a/17 



ENROLL NOW! 



For IntcrmationAboutOtherCenters 
In Major US Cities & Abroad 
0.» .(jp NY State 
CALL TOLL FREE 800-223-1782 



3 The B complex does not include 
substances that have been erroneously 
labeled as B 13, B15. and B 17 [laetnlel 
These compounds do not meet the criteria 
to be classified as vitamins and are not 
recognized as such by any of the accepted 
textbooks of nutrition, the Nutrition Foun- 
dation, or the National Academy of 
Sciences. 

4 Statements like 'millions of Americans 
are deficient. ■ and that '■ B vitamins 
are so meagerly supplied in the American 
diet that almost every American lacks some 
of them- grossly exaggerate the verv 
limited prevalence of vitamin deficiencies 
identified in several ma/or nutrition surveys 
in the last few years Although some actual 
deficiencies do exist, if the condition were 
as bad as l^s Eggleston suggests one 
<Aould ex pet- r high incidences of deficiency 
sfases such as pellagra, pernicious 
anemia, benben, etc. m this countn^. These 
diseases are rare ,n the U. S but prevalent 
'» many other areas of the globe 

^i oarbohydr.itL's contain glucose. 

■ ''re. It IS inaccurate to say that B 

t.inuns convert "carbohydrate to 

jji.i ,)>.*' •■ Thp B vitamins are essential in 



carhohydrate, protein, and lipid 
metabolism. Since sugar \sucrose\ is a 
I rbohydrate consisting of glucose and 
fructose [the sweetner in honey\. B 
^ita'nins are used in its metabolism. To say 
:lh,, .jgtr destroys these vitamins is no 
■" accurate than to say that proteins and 
destroy them. Certain vitamin an- 
•isis do exist in nature: an emyme is 
o'ne types of raw fish and clams destroys 
thiamin, a compound in mai/e decreases 
the niacin available component, and a 
protein in raw egg interferes with biotin 
ihsorption. 



6 Alcoholics have a higher incidence of B 
vitamin deficiencies than the rest of the 
nopulation Although it is a possibility that 
ilcohol may antagonize these vitamins, it is 
currently believed that the deficiencies of B 
vitamins are related to reduced food 
consumption associated with excess 
imcMints of alcohol in the diet 



' Vitamin B 12 Icyanocobalaminl is not 
found in brewer's yeast, whole gram 
ifreals. or any other phnt material in 




appreciable quantities. To obtain enough of 
this vitamin one must consume either 
'^^^f' J'^^ tryi/k or eggs. Strict vegetarians 

n.Z^ '^^f ^ ^^'^^ ^^PP'ement or 
period. Shots to prevent pernicious 



8. Little or no scientific evidence exists to 
indicate that "natural sources are more 
readily absorbed . ." than synthetic ones. 
Thus, the synthetic sources used to fortify 
or enrich refined or processed foods will 
ftave the same nutritive value as those 
occurring naturally. 

For a further understanding of the B 
vitamins and other nutrients we refer you to 
Introduction to Nutrition by Helen Guthrie, 
A Diet for Living by Jean Mayer, and 
Recommended Dietary Allowances 
published by the National Academy of 
Sciences. 

F.J. Francis 

MokhtarT Atallah 

K. M Hayes 

Kenneth W Samonds 

Robert L Shewfelt 



ft? 



HJ9GEnilOUZ 



Get two Regular Roast Beef 
Sandwiches for one sf fecial 
price. Each sandwich is 
made with slowcooked 
beef, sliced thin, and piled 
high. And you get youi 
choice of three tangy 
sauces So every bite is 
juicy, tDeefy, and delicious. 

Add some of our rr.cp 



tasty fries and a soft dnnk, 
and your meal is deliciously 
comf)lete. 

The next time you go 
to Hardees, take along 
someone you like. 
And take along this coupon. 
Order two Regular Roast 
Beef Sandwiches for $1.39. 
That s a juicy deal. 



/ 



-^ 



GET TWO REGULAR 
ROAST BEEF SANDWICHES 

FOR ^U9. 

Good at all participating HardeeF. Please present this coupon before ordering. 

One coupon per customer, please. Customer must pay any sales tax due 

on the purchase price. This coupon not good in combination with any other offers. 



^1 



HarOfM' ^ of H.i'Ucy 
^^<. Hiiss«'ll Str. ct 

■ V MrlSS 



Hardeer 



CoufX)n expires '^ 'I'P'st 30. 19/8 



ednwday. August 16. 1978, 




* * . ' 






/^Our 'Red Arrow' ^ 
values help you 
cope with inflation. 

Besides cxjr advertised 
specials, we have hurxjreds 
ot Red Arrow' Values 
Special Manufacturers' allow- 
ances that oiif buyers stock 
up on, and pass atoog to you 
You can tell them by the 
special, bnght red shelf tags 
we use to point them out 
Look for the 'Red Arrows and 
take advantage of the sav- 
ings Each tag is dated, so 
you know how k)ng you II be 
able to get every Red An'ow 
lA/alue 



Ctorox f Scott m Cheez- 



^JMeach ilW It • 

^ Crackers 




Gallon t:f ^ ' \ Big Roll 
Jug ^: J1 19 count 



i><^ ."_r^...«.-,-v«., 260'^^^«^ *^'' ■ 




I 

I 

"; Sunshine ;i_^ _ 

lOoz. pkg. :{§ Stop & Shop 1 
""" -— ^ - ,^ ~ 

I 

j" _ Yellow Of ~ 

t:^ Sp*cy Brown ^ 

|^_ . -,,^ I~^. T^. ^v^ 9 ounce jar 




i [stop 4 Sho pCou|^j|rij| 




lUoz. pkg. 

39 



^ stop & Shop ^ 

Mustard^ Fnes ^i 




Regular or 

Crinkle Cut 

9 ounce package 



self service deli s«.c« ^■^'^•'''■---•^^^^^---^===^^1^&^2W1^^^- ■ ■ ;vL2:sa-4«iSS|i '•■. '""O^J^ir-ii;,^ 

s,iv ings jfi quality Coioiii.il Of ixlucfs ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ "'"■•"•■-"•iito — ^.. mm tL ,m m i7« — « — ^^mS^mw2^ 



Make us your store 
Sor summer savings. 



Colonial Extra Mild 

Franks Q< 



Colonial Bologna 

Ham Steaks 

Beef or Smoky Strips 



corner deli 




A •, ...( 



Stop & Shop Corner Dell 

9ologna 




P'eshfy sliCf! 
?0 your order 



^ ^ II. 



Weaver Turkey Ham 2 69 
Muenster Cheese "1 79 

'White Gem'Roasted 

Tiulcey Breast 

Ail '.Vtiit, V.., • •^ s^^^9A 

or Roast Beef '«7? 

Fresh Baked Meat Loat ' 1 69. 
Stop & Stx)p Cole Slaw 59 
Chicken Salad . , ... '1 .99, 
Rice Pudding 1,* r 69. 
Rye Bread ..". • .• 59 



_CenterCiit 

PoricChop 




Enjoy special savings on ycu( 
lavorife cuts o» Our BiaEve 







our kitchen aii k.n<te of 

deliCKXs foods from our chefs 

Stops Shop Roasted or 

B-B-Q Chicken 

Seaaooed ana cooked to *" '^' 
grifden i>^ection 

21b Pkg, Potato Salad 
Cole Slaw . . . 
Macaroni Salad 



Loin 

^^4i^ThinCutM.59. 
Country Style Pork Ribs ^ 1 39 
Boneless Sirloin Cutlets 1 69 

Assorted Pork 

' ' Center Chops $^fl^^^% 

' Blade Chops ^tMt9 

Sirloin Chops ^^L ib 

Blade Cut Pork Chops lco 1 .29 
Sirloin Pork Chops 8one.nLo*. 1.39 




I60Z pkg. 

Ronzoni «^ 
Pasta 

31 



Hunts 8 ounce can 

[Tomato 
Sauce 




Italian Dressinc^; 69 Jell-0 Gelatin .- 2. 79- 

Macaroni and Cheese 69 B.g H Burger Sauce ^■ 



Chofis 



Progr esso 28oz can 

[Italian 
,,^.^inatog 



ReaOy 
"'CrushtKJ ( 




Stewed Tomatoes 
Wax Beans 



Welch's 2O0Z. jar 

Grsme 

Jam ^p^V 



39 C W Post Cereal ■ . . 89' 
" 1 Ralston Bran Chex : 79- 



Hi-C Assorted Nabisco 1 3oz. bag 



1 



09 



Ik 

98 

1 19 

59 



Fresh Poifc 



seafood vu-r cro..e ui r-t-sri 

and frc/en tre.its from the sea 

CodFOlets 
Fresh 169 

Cooked Snrimp 1 j>j 

Stuffed Clams . 1 79 

Sctirod Haddock Fillets 1 49 




tj.' iV f\f t>.«ftjev,ll»' Srti«,>- .irxj r Trm Qp ff^. 



Boneless Center Cut Port< Chops 1 .99 
Boneless Pork Roast 1.89 



■ 70'<p^ 79' 



Dixie Fun Cups 
Decorated Rates 



79 Rpynolcf s Wrap 
99 Saran Wrap 



99 
99 



frozen foods l 
gallon Stop &^hop 



r vr»i' *'»■! .1 



Beef 



^^ 



DdKeryAll m:vlp with fine ir»qredi.,nts 

Stop & Shop 

Daisy Donuts 
^ 1 



Plain Su'ia 
Cinramon and 
AGuorted 



n .oz 
Of T? 
.2... 



2 

English Muftms 
Cranberry Nut Bread 



Stop & Shop 22oz. pkg 



tnll Steak 

1 P T * ^ * ■ wiKif trie aualif V . jii .Vrint ,<rui thi ^^H^ 



Beef Top Round Roast ;.sDAaK>.c. 1.59 
Beef Round Cube Steak 




4 size 



-0-Rama 



Apple, Lemon 
Pineapple cr 
Cfiocolate Eclair 




89 



Buttercrest Bread ". ' ■ 2 
Jewisti Rye Bread .2 



Free 1/2 Gallon Coke 
with each roll of 
Blm developed 

Bring your exposed roll of color print film 
to Stop & Sliop this ¥v^eK only and receive 
a half gallon txjtfle of Coke free of charqr^ 
f^o coupon required Offer expires Aug 1 9 
1978 




1.99 



stop S .Shop 

Lemon 
-ade 

t .dgeandPop 109 Pizza Snack Tray . 99 

Layer Cake ] 29 Meat Entrees 2' . 1 

CerrnlyCtrus 1.09 Salisbury Steak • .• ^179 

M ~%'^^'^ rc:_-;-j-^ Stop & Shop 




' California ."zz. 

/ Largest Size grown $^sa ^j— 

neydewsl^' 



^ produce RshCakes 39 Grapefruit Juice 

At the peaK or freshness Cape Cod Crahmeat . 169 Aunt Jemima Waffles 

Fillet of Sole Dinner 59 Light Coffee Rings 



69 



^ California Honeydews 1.19 

^^ California Red Cardinal ^^ ^^ 

Grapes 69 




Oil trcsr viimmiv s[>ori.ilS 

Hood 100% Pure 



SealteSt Ac^nrfMr^riavors 



Qranaa light n'Uvely 



Juice 

99 



G.lMnr 
Fion- 
Concenff.itt 







Jumbo 

Mani 



. . _. . . . > . .. — — Margarine 

Assorted Folnae Hood Instant Whip , 79 Crescent Rolls 

Assorted Fohage CottageCheese ; ■'. ■ 69 Breakstone Dips ^; 

Plants Cheese Spread Slices 99 Lemonade 



>*!%> A *'.hi-t' 



59 
39^ 







HADLEY-AMHERSTRoute9at the Hadley-Amherst Line. Sa.m.-lOp.m., Mon.-Sat. We redeem your Federal Food Stamps. 



"olle gian 



BvDOMESSER 



The four seasons and seasonings 



edho^dav, AugU'il 16, 197; 



New York City born and a confirmed city 
boy at heart, I looked forward to commg to 
UMass as a chance to finally live in the 
country. Friends assured me that I'd love it, 
friends who had spent a couple of years iri 
Vermont and who now live on a farm in 
Maine Would I too fall so in love with 
country living that New York City would be 
forever out of the question ' 

Frankly, I hoped not All I wanted was a 
chance to smell some clean air and to eat 
some locally grown food for a while 

The house I live in now was built in 1790. 
It has a pear tree, an apple tree and a cherry 
tree so large that only the birds can reach 
the fruit Behind them is a garden, an herb 



milk and '? cup ot apple cider, cooked until 
the wine had lost its alcohol (about 15 
minutes) and the sauce had thickened 
slightly. Using the vegetables to thicken the 
gravy saved every last bit of flavor from the 
roast and eliminated the need for a flour 
and butter roux The pork was so |uicy and 
meaty that I realized I'd never had pork that 
tasted like it had come from an animal. 
Visions of gentleman farming flooded my 
mind A few cows, chickens, hogs, fruit 
trees and a garrden and I'd be set. The 
foliag was turning, school was everything 
I'd wanted and I was growing used to a 
slower, richer lifestyle 

Winter was a time for long walks in 
the woods behind the house, thermal 
underwear and my down sleeping bag 



Food 



garden and more fields and trees than Ive 
seen outside of a camping trip. To be able 
to wake up to the freshly scrubbed smell of 
the morning dew and a breakfast of freshly 
brewed coffee and English muffins without 
having to sleep in a tent is a truly heady 
experience 

One of our housemates knew some 
people who'd raised a few hogs on grain 
and the leftovers from monthly keg parties, 
and got us a roast for an October dinnef 
party I cooked it on a bed of apples, 
carrots, celery and onions, chopped fine 
and sprinkled with sage and a crushed 
garlic clove 

The gravy was the cooking vegetables 
NernJed with a cup of white wine, a cup of 



opened into a blanket Mornings were now 
so cold and crisp that, once I was out of 
bed. my thoughts were clear and I was 
eager for hard work We discovered a 
common love for kielbasa and used it to 
flavor everything 

I felt a little guilty over all those nitates and 
the processed meat, so I searched for some 
substitutes I discovered that frying two 
onions brown and tossing them into a pot 
of cooking kidney beans with four or five 
whole cloves of garlic gave a stock strong 
enough to flavor a soup without benefitof 
kielbasa The soup, we decided, was the 
best variation had nee, cabbage, carrots for 
a base with a chopped onion and some 
celery thrown in fifteen minutes before the 



soup was served, so that they;d be cooked 
yet retain some crunch We tossed in half 
cup of parmisian while we were getting the 
French bread out of the oven and a couple 
of quarts of soups vanished in minutes. 

Late February I could do without and 
Spring is always late in New England, if it 
shows up at all. I learned to bless the skunk 
cabbage because it was the first green that 
showed in the woods behind our house. 
There wasn't much chance to experiment 
culinanly, because I had a full course load 
and the grade inflation of my undergrad 
days seemed to haveended I was loo busy 
to do moie than take an occasional walk 
toclear my head and notice the slow signs 
of NewEngland's Spring. 

I was rewarded for my diligence by a 
California born fiiiend who took me to her 
cabinin Monson one Saturday night and 
fed me bean burritos, Spanish Rice, spinich 
salad, homegrown herbs and enough 
sombreros to make me truly believe in the 
possibility of summer Her rice was flavored 
with her homemade tomato relish but I 
duplicated most of its flavors once school 
was out and I had time to experiment. 
To make Jennifer's Spanish Rice, saute 
one onion and two cloves of garlic in oil 
until transparent Add '« tsp cumin. V* tsp 
chill powder, 1 tsp paprika, a pinch each of 
ground coriander and tumeric, slat, pepper 
and cayenne to taste and cook foir a few 
more minutes Add half a can of plum 
tomatos and 1 tbsp vinegar and cook for 
about 15 minutes. There should be about 
'« cup ot liquid 

Add .wo cups of long gram rice an 
denough water to make 4 cups liquid 15 
cups if using brdwn nee), bring to a boil 
and simmer till done. 
Summer brought asource forfresh un 



pasturized creamand I ve spent it making all 
those cream sauces I ve formerly made 
withmilk. We shake it in a small jar until it 
thickens and add it to our after dinner 
coffee and there are few things more 
decadentthan sitting on your porch wat 
ching the sun go down and sipping coffee, 
fresh whipped cream sprinkled with cin- 
namon. One thing that is more decadent is 
slicing 4 peaches (peeling them if you like 
by dropping them in hot water until the skin 
loosens) into V4 cup of cream, sweetening 
and simmering for about 15 minutes. Add a 
dash or 2 of almond extract and wonder 
why. in the midst of the calm cleanliness of 
the Western Massachusetts countryside, 
you still miss the hot and crowded streets 
and the manic frantic energy of the city. 




f 



c 



Sgt Pepper: a kids "conversation 



St Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band 
Movie Soundtrack 
RSO Records 

Revtewed by KEN SHAIN. SHONDA 
HUN TER. a LA WRENCE WELLS 

Lawrence Did you see Sgt Peppers yet' 

You know, the movie with tfie Bee Gees 

and Paul McCarthv. Did vou see it vet? 

Sbonda: No. no. you mean Sgt Pepper. 

without the s,' and its with Peter l-ram- 

pton. not Paul McCartney 

Lawrence: Well, did you see it' 

Shonda: No, but I want to, even if my 

daddy does say its )unk. 

Lawrence: He must know an awful lot 

about It He showed me his Sgt. Peppers 



Shonda: Me too. 

Lawrence: It s supposed to be about the 

Beatles or something. 

Shonda No, no, no It's supposed to be 

about Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club 

Band 

Lawrence What's that? 

Shonda I don't know 

Lawrnece: Well, where do the Beatles 

come into it' 

Shonda They're the ones who wrote the 

songs in the movie. 

Lawrence: Then who are the BeeGees' 

Shonda They are the band that plays the 

band in the movie. 

Lawrence: Oh 

Shonda: You know, my daddy says that 

the Beatles played those songs before I was 

born 



Arts/MusIc 

autograph book and let me look at the 

pictures 

Shonda: You mean he let you look at the 

photographs in the press kit that the record 

companies sent him. 

Lawrence: Yeah, that was it Boy those 

pictures sure were neat. I'd sure like to see 

the movie' 



Lawrence Even before I was bom' 
Shonda Even before you were born. 
Lawrence Wow' That s over ten years 
ago' Boy, it took a long time for them to 
make it into a movie Why didn't they make 
It .nto a movie then' 

Shonda: I don't know. Maybe they 
couldn't. 



Lawrence: I don't care. I want to see it 

anyway, even if it is old. I heard your 

father s record and I thought that it was 

better than Kiss. 

Shonda Better than Shaun Cassidy? 

La^^rence: Yup' 

Shonda No no 

La\^rence Uh huh 

Shonda Not better than Cheap Trick. . . 

Lawrence I don't know who Cheap Trick 

IS 

Shonda They're a band that sounds like 
the Beatles They play rock and roll. 
Lawrence: Oh Are they in the Movie? 
Shonda: I don't know I hopes'). 
Lawrence Who else is in the movie' 
Shonda Earth, Wind and Fire, I think. I'm 
not sure. 

Lawrence: Do you think your father will 
take us to see it before the vacation is over' 
Shonda: I think he will, even if he doesn't 
like It. He says its for us kids "who missed 
all the action." 
Lawrence: What action? 



Live Entertainment 

h 
^^m Dancing 

^^I^ITESa WEE 

m0 Wed - Sat 

M Night Riders 

9*4 Sun 

J2 Moe Oixon 
Williams & Uallan 

Tues 

Off the Wall 

Wed - Thurs 

Uea Williams 

92 Main St. 
Ihe Florence Section of Northampton 
4 Miles West of Smith College. Rte. 9 

584 7613 




I 



Jlcfloewgainnsie 



ENNIS 
SALE 

All Racquets and Frames 

20% OFF 

FREE tennis cover 

with purchase 

of racquet 



«^x 



FENTON'S 

ATHLETIC SUPPUES 

377 Main St Amherst 253-3973 
9-5:30 M-F 9-1 Sot. til tobor Doy 



Northampton, Mass, 



WED toTUE Auq 16 22 DOUBLE FEATURE! 



Wednesday. August 16, 1978, 



.ColTfe gian 



- -ADULT ENTERTAINMENT 

MajMtic CloMna 

84 Cottage Street (Rte. 141) 

Easthampton, Massachusetts 01027 

Tel 527 2346 



Feelthie fjeat of August sounds 



Cherry Hustlers 
Jallbalt 



7:50 
8:80 



Air conditioned 
nnder ai not admitted 



FIRST AT 7 00 



Compared to them, 

the Macbcths were 

just pl^dn folks 

aj\d the Boi^^ia^s 

were a nice 
Italian faonily. 



**Somcthing 
for Everyone 



Angela Lansburv' 
Michael York 



COLOR 



PLUS ATS 00 



^^Original, alive and 
ribaldly funny." 

— Charles Champlin. 
L A Times 



»>Hiirsig«aiis! 



Mmk$rH Ckh$u fM 

82 Main St. 2S3-7835 

•Fresh Chinese 

Vegetables from our 

own Farm 
•Fully Air Conditioned 
•Closed Wednesday 
•Luncheon Specials 

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OREDKEN* 



By MARIO A. BARROS 

Traditionally, August is always the sum- 
mer season's hottest month. As tar as the 
weather goes though, this month's open- 
ing tiasn't exactly coaxed on any air condi- 
tioners. Musically tiowever, August has 
given us some real heat. Some of the latest 
single and LP releases are almost too hot to 
handle! 

One of the real toppers is the latest 
GaryBartz LP on Capitol Records. Entitled 
"Love Affair", this one will swoon alot of 
ladies and move alot of feet. Bartz does 
two things with this album. First, he shows 
that he is one of the premier saxophone 
players on the scene today. His playing is 
sharp, precise, and expressive Bartz cuts 
no slack in his arrangements even on the 
slowest grinders. Each twist and riff has a 
sense of neccessity about it that can't be 
denied. 

The second thing he does with this LP is 
broaden his audience. While the line 
l)etween broadening one's audience and 
"copping out" is thin, I feel t can say that 
G.jrv Bart? is still the Gary Bartz that we 
heard in "Music Is My Sanctuary" He 
hasn't gone "disco ", as they say, but there 
will 1)6 plenty of folks dancing to his music. 
While he goes with the meticulous 
arrangement to stir the soul slowly on the 
tjallads, he shows all the elasticity of P 
Funk in the super-infectious "Shake Your 
Body (It's The Joint). Full of handclaps, 
stretchy l^ass and timely percussion, this 
cut's a mover from the word go". 



This just may t>e Bartz' best LP to date as 
cuts are sound and feature just what the 
cover implies will be found; Gary Bartz 
playing sax as only he can. 
A left field pick for the serious Euro-Disco 
stepper is Amanda Lear's second LP on 
Chrysalis entitled "Sweet Revenge ". The 
sound IS Munich with a taste of vamp. Side 
one is a story of a young girl who sells out 



second effort tor that laoei and both have 
been giant leaps beyond his past work with 
the Hot Band and the immortal Cockettes. 
Until his rebirth in San Francisco, Syvester 
was quite a visual act (in drag and a blond 
wig) but his records were lacking 
something A couple of LPs that I can't 
even remember were recorded on ABC and 
t>ouQht probably by his relatives and his 



Arts/MusIc 



to the Devil but winds up with revenge The 
songs of the tale are segued together to 
make it a 20 minute dance marathon. 
Instrumentally. this is a fine piece of 
Munich Disco Vocally, Ms Lear leaves a 
little to t>e desired Her vocals, overiy 
breathy and low on range, are saved by two 
things; great m • Mon and some of 

ih»' wildest vuc :.' of Grace Jon« 

and the Village People Full of camp, cuts 
like Enigma (Give a Little Mmph To Me)' 
arid The Stud ' give Amanda a flair that's 
Hed as far as being nsque goes. 
id Lear is a very exciting lady ar»d her 
daring and originality makes up for any 
lacks in tier vocal delivery In fact, her 
delivery is prut)ably the best for her lyrics. 
Besides, they satd Grace Jones couldn't 
sinqi 

The hottest LP release vet thn<Hih •« 
Sytvester s Step H on Fantasy. This is his 



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cultlike foHuwiiig (including myself) He 
went to Europe and believe it or not, some 
folks missed him (again, including myself). 
He came back with a revamped show and 
Liegan playing the Frisco scene and signed 
with that little progressive label in Berkely, 
Fantasy (The turning point of his career ' 
Last summer, he released a disco disc thai 
had an excellent cover of Ashford and 
Simpson's "Over and Over'. When I 
realized that this was my long lost Sylvester 
and his rousing, handclappmg and gospel- 
tinged music were here' 

"St^ H " shows that 1st LP was no fluke. 
With tfie cuts You Make Me Feel Mighty 
Real " and "Dance (Disco Heat)' Sylvester 
proves that he can move folks with not only 
his amazing presence but with his recorded 
self too. His live show is even more of a 
visual experience with his r>ew backup con- 
tingent that goes by ttie nanne of Two lon% 
a Fun Sylvester merely 4lascribes tf>ese 
two targe and loveables as "big. black, arnl 
t>eautifiil 

His music is puteatmg arnJ compellir>g ft 

has a charge that fiis the air with crackling 
excitement and a sense of urgency that's 
only stilled when Sylvester slides into the 
arrangement with his sexually matured 
falsetto. His is a voice that can soothe and 
disarm or whip the soul into a frenzy tf«t 
overtakes the body in a way that envies the 
gospel tradition he clearly borrows from on 
many occasions. 

Sylvester is r>othir>g short of an en- 
tertainment pherK>mena. His total act 
(which I haven't caught for some time! is 
an experience one can't soon forget. His 
use of costume is striking as f>e goes from 
classic dress to baroque to drag, but the 

"record" shows that this man is more than 
a pile of paste ons and gimmicks. He has 
talent ttiat's urKJeniable But nx>re im- 
portant tf>an ttuit is his commitnr>ent to his 
work. Sylv^ter is a professional entertair>er 
and this LP and his future works will make 
us appreciate him as such. 

As far as singles go, Kelly Mane has a nice 
followup on Vanguard in "Make Love to 
Me". She's more raucous in this outing 
and one doesn t get that 'empty ' feeling 
after heanng it. It's a gutsy number that 
could sneak up tf>e charts. It's a 12" disc. 
Private Stock records has two big 12" discs 
in "Think It Over ' and "Music Ferver" by 
Cissy Houston and the Michael Zager 
Band Houston wears the uptempo 
rnatenal well and churns right along nicely 
with the music This is a bit of another side 
for her and I for one. am glad to see it. This 
IS one of the tiest female vocal per- 
formances of the year, but then, what 
would you expect from Cissy Houston? 



Starring CRAIG RUSSELL 



• • AT THE GATES OF SMITH COLLEGE • • • ♦ 



BRANDYWINE 

at Amherst 

Moving off campus? 



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North Amherst 549-0600 





says 

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M iller draughts 35' 
Most bar drinks 75' 



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Naxt to ttw fik 



-4-2, Co/fegian, Sept. 5. 1978 





B^ EILEEN M. FOLEY 



Our poster has a picture of a toilet on it. " says Moss 
May, "very ceramic " May and fellow M.F.A candidate 
Ed Lewin are the creators of Pay Art, a free exhibition 
of ceramic sculpture, which is the opening exhibit for 
the Fall 78 semester at the Student Union Gallerv 

Located m SU 115, adjacent to the People's Market, the 
Student Union Gallery is unique to this area in that it is 
entirely student run It was started as an experimental 
gallery and has gained a reputation for bringing Avante 
Garde art into the Amherst area, but . fccus of this 



year s scnedule will be on artisits like Lewin and Mav 
whp are drawn from the University community 

Although these two sculptors work in th« same 
n>edium, they express very different perspectives on 
art Ed Lewin's work makes subtle yet sucinct 
statements about society and the place of art in that 
society, while Moss May concerns himsdf with such 
concepts as balanced opposition between opposing 
elements and forces, "communicated" through a 
universal symbology. This divergence will most likely be 
expressed by a great deal of diversity within the con 
fines of Pay Art. 



..y, l . ' : ! J^.:!U.I.. ..J... l ,-:;:.:.;.v.l.,l! l .:n. l .l.l] 



Moss May's sculpture, a 

study in opposing forces, 

\fs/\\\ be in the first exhibit 

of the year for the 

Student Union Gallery 



•■?«««aS2£i&;.;S^A;ii 



BOLTWOOD BELCHERTOWN PROfECT 



$ Rtcrmitmemt will take piam Sept. 5-20 at area coUtgt*. Look for oar poster* and adt for 
« dates and timet of informational meetings. For more intormatwm, call 323^11, ext. 449. 

Pasr rrrrrLr/Tfr -.r r rm rtjmtrryrt^i a^ t Ti-n-tiffnr n ifiriri'^i-rpr-ririrr^-^frrr 




yM^mMfrMmiiiimmm]mim]m\mmmm\fBm 



Have YOU 
considered Asian Studi 



If you know little or nothir>g about South or East 
Aaia, you ow« it to youraatf to l«arn aomathing 
about ttw ottMT half of th« world 

Sffveral of our b«ginnir>g language couraet and 
introductory couraea taught In English ar» (tin 
open. There are rto prvrequiaitee for any of 



We an tf>e o«>fy program at a public inetitution 
in alt of New England to offer ttw 8 A in 
Chineae and Japaneee (lar>guag«, literature, 
lMigu<atics)!l We aleo offer the Asian Studies 
Certificate (a supplement to any other mator in 
the Univeraity).** 

PLEASE COME AND SEE US 



OPEN COURSES- i^u PKEREQUISITES 

Beginning Language Courses: 

Chinese 126 Intensive Elementary Chir>eaaa, 6cr. 

Japanese 126 intensive Elementary Japanaae, 6 or. 

Asians 197A B Elementary Sanskrit, 4 cr. 

Introductory Courses Taught in English: 

Asians 150 Development of Moftmrn Aaia, O core 

Asians 297A Chinese Calligraphy, 1 cr. 

Asians 397A Images of tf>e Femir>ine in Indian Literatur* 

Chinese 106 Asia through Literature: Chirw, Japan, India 

Chineae 238 Chinese Folk Religion 

Chineae 2S3 Chineae Literary Tradition, C core 

ChirMM297A Buddhism in Chineae Literature 

C h lnwa 312 Mystical Literature East and West, C core 

Japarteae 243 Japanese Literary Tradition, C core 
Japartase 297A Introduction to Japan 

**StwdMrts in ftotural ScianoM, 
to loolt Into tMa. 



schedno. 

122466 or 133489 

460166 

083414 or08368e 

083961 
084313 

133188 
134178 
134364 
134710 
134881 

460680 
461086 



, Education and Human Sorvlcoa ara aapaciaHy ancouragad 




^^Pf 5, 1978, Collegian, A3 



THE SHAGGS 



HE WH ATS? 




THE SHAGGS' 

PHILOSOPHY OF THE WORLD 

»»>• Shaigt tn rwl. puri. unafl«ct«t b* auls.da influmcct. 
\Xt>i m«ic (s diN««ni. .1 ,■ o*,,, nai». Thay (wlwv* in ,|, 

■'^ ■!. II 19 • m'l Ol IKMljnd «l„ ,1, , pw, o« ,1. Of <ll coo- 
lampoiwy KH n «» Mtid uday. pMups gri, Oi* StMgg. do 
«0*l <nli*s MMild hk* ID do. «d nui ,i p«to«n only ^m »., 
Mwv* ui •«« Hw, Iwl pt» ,tM «h«s u>,ni. Um Sh>9||s 
^fluuld iMl. 

Th« Stuggt liN« irou. «id low 10 pwlanii lot you. »ou m»» 
lovo (i^i muiic a< you in«y nol. bui «liuo««t you ImI. 11 in, 
you kiKM you cjn Iiumi io «i<si» aiw n, tMl. Ilwy mV nol 
clund. «w,f i«ut<c Of H,|, ,0 „„^ g^ ^.^ ^ , tBiHr«Mj 
•rorld. Vou thould JMncwt* ttut feocauM you kmrn HMy «. 
PH>« lAM not* en you atk> 



thty m 



fcny Holon m) Oonittiy SiggHi »• tta 
•«•» (nd •»«««» ol J >««(. tanhiy akw, nttkuaS io^ki Md 
luv. kv OKK atm ,i «l «n unlMl.ntM* k.^ n,^ ,^,^ ,^ 
(Mcticr iii««ll<« aiKawaDM and hotpod by «wu mwid Sw«. 
S«<y. Holofi wd Oanxliy liv* m t injil Iswi m tttm HaieriMo. 
•n an MmmtuMt M»cli has aneouragad 'tMa M d>«««^ gw, 
"iMWt MMlfrciod by ouiud* >Mlu»iKei. flMy m» luepy paa#a 
•« lOM arkai ttw, «* UD,n«, Tn., * „ b»c*«»a Swy lova .1. 




Where is Foot Foot? 



By PHILIP MILSTEIN 

Keep hunting through those cut out racks and those 
used bin?, and every once in a while, when 
something looks particularly promising yet you have 
never heard of it, you really owe it to yourself to take a 
darr> and pick up on it And god, if you don't keep 
ch«kinq out those bins, how do you ever expect to 
p»c* up on such hidden gems as The Psychedelic 
Guitar Of Friar Tuck (Mercury) or The Shaggs' 
Philosophy Of The World (Third World rea'lyll? 

Now the Friar Tuck is truly a great LP, laden with spac- 
ed out, punk y drawled versions of "Louis Louis " (sic) 

Alley Oop" and "Oh Sweet Pea" as well as some wild 
oriqinals like "All Monked Up", "Ode to Mother 
Truck , "Fendabenda Ha Ha Ha" and "Where Did Your 
Mind Go" Add to that some great photos of the good 
Friar and cra/ed poems like odes each to mud and to 
coffee, and we have quite a find. With one resen/ation: 
the record was apparently made not by any Friar Tuck 

infif%fffii>iifiiff'»niiiiif»iiiiiiiiiiiHfliiiiiflfi(nHiniifiiftiii 



SUM I 

PHILOSOPHY or THE WORLD 

THAT LITTLE SPORTS CAR 

WHO ARE PARENTS 

MY PAL FOOT FOOT 

MY COMPANION 

I'M SO HAPPY WHEN YOURE NEAR 

tnc 2 

THINGS I WONDER 
SWEET THING « 

ITS HALLOWEEN 
WHY DO I FEEL? 
WHAT SHOULD I DO? 
WE HAVE A SAVIOR 

ocoin 

HIOOUCB tt AUSrWi ■HiCM. ML 
AMMCjtO n TMI SHAUbS 

covfafHoroGWVMi tow*.- 

V.I XMGtCOMrCHOn OUIL.!.,. 4,.„,(, 

*u tatcrioNt . Manu aoao mmk «w 

IWS HMM l» OHMASO 10 IMS nnkj lUWfM 

VtCIAl IH4MQ TO 
i*n., »i(.»r.iikf 

fWdSl . 

»•. ■» • 



Wf CIAI TNMW 10 



H«l SHIM 



iHit l.y a group of LA. studio musicians, and for all its 
ijtruitness it is lacking that magic ingredient called 
.luthenticity 

This authenticity jive, on the other hand, is one thing 
The Shaggs are definitely not deficient in and that 
alone is almost enough to render Philosophy Of The 
World an absolute classic of the highest magnitude* 
And talk atKJut obscure: the band (which consisted of 
the three Wiqgin sisters, Betty, Helen and Dorothy) 
paid a lot of money to have a bulk of copies of the 
album pressed, but to their knowledge the only ones 
that ever were made were the 30 or so they received of 
which they retain only one, to be divided among the 
girls (one of whom now lives in Arizona) and their 
mother 

Even if The Shaggs were not for real they (like Friar 
Tuck) would still be unforgettable, but one of the best 
things about them is that they not only took themselves 



seriously but were in fact so naive as to believe that 
what they were making was gjood, more or less normal 
sounding and accessible, music. 

What The Shaggs' music does in fact sound like is 
rather difficult to describe. To say the least, it is unlike 
anything you have ever heard. Picture if you will two 
guitars, both horribly out of tune and playing nothing 
even remotely resembling any previously existing note, 
a lead vocal doing the same, and drum "patterns " that 
display absolutely no idea as to what to do next It is, as 
you might imagine, very tough to differentiate any one 
song from another, and would be impossible were it not 
for the hook lines being resembled by the vocals. If 
you're with me so far than you must realize that the 
result is the most bizarre and incredible album you have 
ever heard! This is the real Metal Machine 
Music*. n lore legitimate and loveable because it was 

Continued on page 12 



UMASS 

STUDENT 

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UMass/Amherst, MA 01003 
Tel. 545-2800 



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A 4, Collegian, Sept. 5, 1978 



ozawa mangionefiedler 




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Tickets for the subscription series are now 
on sale at the Fine Arts Center box office 
and through mail order For more informa 
tion on tickets, a season brochure or a mail 
order form, call (413) 545 2511 or send a 
stantped self addressed envelope to the 
Fine Arts Center box office. University of 
Massachusetts, Amhefst Massachusetts 
01003 
Subscription series ticket holders save ud 
vv.ird to $15 of the series ticket price and 
are assored tickets to all performances in 
wtiatever series they purchase 
Tickets for individual events of the Con 
cert Hall series will go on sale two weeks 
prior to tf.e event at the box office and all 
Ticketron locations 

The first event of the 1978 79 season 
features ia/7 pianist and vocalist Bobby 
Short The Atlantic Records recording ar 
tist received the Record of tf>e Year m 1972 
from Stereo Review with his best selling 
doul^le LP Bobby Short Loves Cole Porter 
Short has t>een described as "the last of the 
great troubadours He refers to himself as 

a saloon pianist and singer." Short will t>e 
at ' t)v Beverly Peer bass and 

Gt ige, drums The Bobby Short 

concert is the premiere of the season and 
the first event of the Concert Hall Series 

Chuck Mangione and the Chuck 
Mangione Quartet return to the Fine Arts 
Center on Sunday, October 8 Mangione's 
performance at the Fine Arts Center in 1976 
was an instant sell out His recent recordirtg 

of Feels So Good reached the top of the 
popular and tau charts during the spring 
and summer. 

Songwriter, pianist and catiaret style 
vocalist Peter Allen will perform at tfie Fine 
Arts Center on Saturday. October 28. 
Allen's first album. Cortrmental Amertcan, 
featuring Just Ask Me I've Been Tf^ere" 
and I Honestly Love You" was released in 
1974 The same year he won a Grammy 
Award for Best Record of The Year for "I 
Honestly Love You " His most recent 
release. It Is Tinie For Peter Alien. ' is a 
double live album, is a culminat'on of his 
sold out performances at Aver> Fisher Hall, 
the Bottom Line m New Yoik City and the 
Roxy in Los Angeles 

Since 1969 Felioano has been a consistent 
winner of the Gwtar Player magazine and 
Playboy magazine polls in bofh the la/z and 
pop rock guitarist categories Feliciano has 
earned 32 Gold Records since 1969 His 
most recent, which he wrote and recorded, 
IS the theme song for the televisK>n sfK>w 
"Chico and The Man " 

The Broadway Theatre series opens on 
Sundav. October 29 with Neil Simon's 




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"California Suite ' The hit comedy con- 
cerns different people occupying suites of a 
Beverly Hills Hotel at different times for dif- 
ferent purposes. "California Suite" by 
playwrite Neil Simon ran for 445 per- 
forniLinces on Broadway. 

The Wiz. " winner of seven Tony Awards 
including Best Musical, will be presented at 
the Fine Arts Center on Sunday, December 
10, 1978 at 3 and 8 p m. Based on L. Frank 
Baum's immortal children's classic, 'The 
Wonderful Wizard of Oz, ' "The Wiz" is 
one of the n>ost successful musicals on 
Broadway The Wiz ' is directed by Geof 
frey Holder and choreographed by George 
Faison, the same team that staged the 
Broadway production This presentation by 
the National Touring Company is produced 
by Tom Mallow. 

On Tfie Aisle productions will present 

Chicago " in the Fine Arts Concert Hall on 
Saturday. Februarys. 1979 at 3 and 8 pm 

"Side By Side By Sondheim," featuring 
Hermione Gingold will be presented on 
Wednesday. February 7. 1979 The musical 
features music and lyrics by Stephen Son 
dheim and music by Leonard Bernstein, 
Richard Rodgers. Mary Rodgers and Jule 
Styne The production will be presented by 
director producer Harold Prince 

"The Passion of Dracula, originally 
scf^duled as part of the Broadway series, 
has been cancelled. "Side By Side By Son 
dheim * replaoe* that production on the 
subscription series. 

Five events are featured in tf>e Dance 



78 -79 



series 



Series which opens on Saturday, October 
14 with the Martha Graham Dance Com- 
pany The company also performs on Sun- 
day, October 15 at 8 p. m 

The Paul Taylor Dance Company returns 
to the University of Massachusetts for two 
performances on Tuesday, November 7 
and Wednesday, November 8 at 8 p m 
Now in Its twenty fifth year, Paul Taytai 
and the Paul Taylor Dance Company at* 
considered a dominant force in dance in thi 
United States and Europe 

The internationally acclaimed Royal Win- 
nipeg Ballet will also present two per 
formances at the Fine Arts Center Concert 
Hall on November 16 and 17 at 8 p m. The 
Entertainer. Melbourne, Australia wrote of 
the Ballet as 'The finest entertainment the 
world has to offer." 

The famed Canadian troupe, Les Ballet 
Jazz of Montreal will present one per- 
formance at the Fine Arts Center on Tues 
day. February 27, 1979 

Suzanne Farrell and Peter Martins, Stars 
of the American Ballet, will perform at the 
Fine Arts Center on March 8 and 9, 1979 at 8 
p.m. 

The Orchestra series opens on Wednes- 
day, October 18 with a concert by the Pitt- 
sburg Symphony Orchestra, Andre Previn, 
conductor and music arranger The 107 
memlier orchestra now presents over 300 
performances yearly. 

The Springfield Symphony Orchestra, 
Robert Gutter, Conductor, will present 
Handel's "Messiah " on Wednesday, 
December 13. 1978 The event features or- 
chestra and chorus 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra, Seiji 
Ozawa, Conductor, returns to the Fine Arts 
Center as part of the Orchestra Series on 
Thursday, February 15. 1979. The Boston 
Symphony Orchestra performed at the gala 
opening of the Fine Arts Center Concert 
Hall in October 1974 

Tf>e Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra, 
Dmitri Kitaenko. music director, will per- 
form on Thursday, February 22, 1979 The 
orchestra has performed throughout the 
world and have made many recordings 
which have proven enormously popular 
both in Russia and abroad* and have won 
such awards as France s Grand Prix du Dis 
que All performances jn the Orchestra 
Series are at 8p.m. 

The Celebrity Series opens on Fnday, 
November 3, 1978 with a solo performance 
by the world renowned flamenco guitarist 
Carlos M on toy a. 

The English Cf>amber Orchestra, Vladimir 
Ashkena/y, conductor and piano soloist, 
will perform at the Concert Hall on Tues 




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W/ZIPPEREI> .^. . 

With them 
and on them!" 



PILLOWS 

* tmftchmaiibniic 




Sept. 5. 1978. Collegian, AS 



previn xnontoya feliciano 



day, Novemt)er 21, 1978. 

Professor Peter Schickele will bring his ir- 
reverent and hilarious musical spoof, "The 
Intimate P.D.Q. Bach" to the Fine Arts 
Center on Tuesday, February 13, 1979. The 
Intimate P.D.Q. Bach features Professor 
Schickele and the Semi-Pro Musica Anti- 
gua. 

The Celebrity Series concludes or. Friday, 
February 16, 1979 with Arthur Fiedler con- 
ducting the Boston Pops Orchestra at 8 
p.m. 

The Special Attractions which are not a 
subscription series features the Ballet 
Folklorico Mexicano on Wednesday, 
September 27. Thirty-five dancers, singers, 
and musicians present a panorama of color, 
sound and motion as the "Fiesta 
Folklorico" presented by the Ballet 
Folklorico Mexicano offers two hours of ex- 
huberant songs and dances from a thou- 
sand years of Mexican history. 
The Hartford Symphony Orchestra, Ar- 
thur Winograd, Music Director, will appear 
at the Fine Arts Center three times this 
season, each time with a guest soloist. 
Violinist Shiomo Mint? appears with the 
Symphony on Saturday, November 18, 
1978. Mint/ palyed with the Hartford Sym 
phony Orchestra in last season's Worcester 
Music Festival. This year will mark his Hart 
ford debut. The 19 year old violinist has 
played with the BBC Orchestra, Berlin 
Philharmonic and Vienna Philharmonic. 

Pianist Andre Watts will perform with the 
Hartford Symphony Orchestra on March 6 
1979 

Garrick Ohisson, winner of the Chopin In- 
ternational Piano Competition in Warsaw in 
1970, IS guest soloist with the Hartford 
Symphony on Thursday, May K), 1979 This 
season Mr Ohisson's recital engagements 
include performances in Amherst, Buenos 
Aires, Italy, Norway, Romania and Prague 
The Hartford Ballet will present the holi 
day favorite. The Nutcracker, on Saturday, 
December 2 at 3 and 8 p.m. and Sunday, 
December 3 at 3 p.m. 
The Boston Symphony Orchestra with 
Chorus, Seiji Ozawa, Conductor, will per- 
form as part of the Special Attractions on 
Saturday, February 17, 1979 This per 
formance is not part of the Orchestra 
Series. 

Other special attractions are being 
scheduled and will be announced at a later 
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i 



The first issue of The Massachusetts 
Review, in 1959, contained original 
publications of poetry by Robert Frost and 
ee cummings, and that was only the 
beginning. 

The Review, a quarterly of the arts, 
literature, and public affairs, originated 
here on the campus of UMass, and after 
publishing for nearly twenty yeras and 
earning wide recognition, it remains here at 
UMass, working out of office in the 
basement of Memorial Hall 

An article in The Boston Globe last year 
called ttie Review a "splendid 
anachronism" and said, "The quarterly has 
earned a reputation as one of the very best 
college maga7ines, and that reputation is 
based largely on its long string of revisionist 
essays about US. history, politics and 
culture. The best pieces are a bit cranky, a 
bit contrary, a bit leftist, and wholly 
superb " 

The Review is now a five-college co 
operative venture, but its heart still belongs 
to UMass Most all of its editors are from 
the UMass faculty. 

"In 1959, the University was really at a 
crossroads," said Editor John Hicks, a 
professor in the English Department here. 
"There was no question that the state 
university could grow immensely Either we 
were going to grow in size and excellence, 



or we were going to grow in size and 
mediocnty." 

If one were to judge the University by the 
Review, there would be no doubt that we 
have grown "in size and excellence." 

The staff of the Review works with spirit 
and dedication. When I talked to Hicks, the 
two words that kept reoccuring in his 
conversation were "pride" and "vision." 

The Massachusetts Review was 
conceived as a faculty contribution to 
excellence The intent was an elite 
publication that would address itself to 
national problems." Hicks said it was not 
concieved as a "local" publication, "but 
drawing on the resources of the Five (then 
four) College community, as well as othe»' 
parts of the country, to represent the 
university's contibution to the larger world 
of letters." 

It sounds grandiose, it sounds pompous, 
but there was a real vision," he said. Hicks 
called the Review "one of the new 
manifestations of the new excellence and 
energy" of the University 

The spirit of the Review, according to 
Hicks, comes from a 19th century 
publication that was called The 
Massachusetts Quarterly Review, 
edited in the mid 1800s by Ralph Waldo 
Emerson and Theodore Parker. 

"We adopted the Emersonian ideals and 
the vision that had stimulated The 
Massachusettts Quarterly Rev.'^w," 



Hicks said. 

From time to time, the Review publishes 
special issues, dealing extensively with one 
topic. In the past years, one of their most 
popular issues was a special on Thoreau, 
focusing on civil disobedience, during the 
divil rights demonstrations of the 1960s. 

In 1972, the Review published a special 
edition called Women; An Issue, which 
was later published in book form by Lit- 
tle. Brown. 

I heir latest special was a two edition set. 
Fall and Winter 1977 issues, called "Chant 
of Saints, An Anthology of Afro American 
Writing Reflecting The State of the Culture 
in the 1970s " The two issue set also in- 
cluded works by Black artists and will soon 
l)p published in book forrn. 

The editors of the special issues weie 
Michael S Harpor, a professor at Brown 
University and Robert- B Stepto, a 
professor at Yale University and chair 
person of the Modern Language 
Associations Committee on Minority 
Liieraturf;. 

"We wanted to see what sort of harvest of 
art, scholarship, wniing and so on has the 
past 15 or 20 years of effort to bring Black 
people into the center of the arts has 
produced. We gathered the best writers, 
and artists, young or established. It was a 
landmark achievement. No other 

Continued on page fO 



the radical press 



Sept. 5. 1978. Collegian. A 9 



By K S TFPHEN SHAIN 

With fall semester set to begin, it won't 
be too long before the Campus Center Con- 
course is transformed into, arrK>ng other 
things, a Cavalcade of Truth as radical 
organizations and special interest groups 
from ail over the Valley descend upon 
UMass as p>art of their fall ideological offen- 
sive. Though upperclassmen here at Umass 
take for granted the daily distribution of 
literature by these groups in the Campus 
Center, incoming frwhmen tend to be con- 
fused by the illusion of diversity that each 
of these groups collectively maintains. 
Although the various groups may differ in 
tactics, positions, and approaches, they all 
have one thing in comnKMi; they each have 
a newspaper that serves to express tfieir 
ideological position to their readership and 
hopefully to the lot of them, nnake new con- 
verts. Functioning more to confuse 
students than to enlighten xhem or assist 
them, these r>ewspapers lay claim to 
"truth" as a property exciusiveiy ttieirs. 

This brief survey of radical newspapers 
will hopefully be instrumental in defusing 
•ome of the confusion tfiat abour>ds here at 

UMass and give the incoming freshmen 
dass the opportunity to see the alternative 
press and their parent groups in perspective 
and in relation to one another. With a clear 
head and an open mirni, it shouldn't be very 
difficult at all to distinguish between con- 
trolled forms of protest (those that con- 
fuse, divide or antagonize) and those forms 
that earnestly and effectively fight for social 
progress. 



"^9 Call: Recent entry into tf>e radical 
neyvspaper derby representing on a weekly 
bans the viewpoint of the Communist Party 
(Marxist-Leninist), formerly known as the 
October League. Recently awarded the 
Peking franchise in America for its unswer 
ving loyalty to the present regime in China, 
the CMPL has quickly gained a reputation 
on the left for its support of U.S. im 
perialism in Africa. A linle more than a year 
old. The Call prints unsigned articles and 
specializes in inflamatory denunciations of 
the rest of the left, as well as its already-by 
now trademark condemnation of reformism 
and advocacy erf seperatism. The Call 
functions as an agent of agitation on the 
left more than it seeks to express or to serve 
the downtrodden it claims to represent. 
Originally arising out of the split in the 
Maosit left over the Gang of Four last Year, 
The Call will undoubtedly nr>ake its campus 
debut here this fall as it seeks to enlighten 
students as to the "truth" about 
Kamuchea, Zaire, or Saturday Night Fever. 
Look for it on a truth table near you. 

Challenge: Official newsweekly of the 
Progressive Labor Party, America's first 
Maoist splinter group. Originally surfacing 
out of a split in the Communist Party USA 
in 1962, the PLP was officially founded in 
1964 and gained its initial support during 
the anti-war movement. Active on cam- 
puses throughout the latter half of the six- 
ties, the PLP has been in a constant state of 
decline as new and improved Maoist 
groups make their appearance on the 
scene. Touted as "The Revolutionary Com- 
munist Newspaper", Challenge is noted 
for its hatred of District 11^, National 
Union of Hospital and Health Care Workers 
and functions as somewhat of a "left- 
opposition" force in progressive led unions 
in general. This newspaper is still available 
on campus but is slowly being replaced by 
more modern agitational organs. 



The Militant The weekly voice of 
American Trotskyism published by_ the 
Socialist Workers Party. The SWP' sup- 
ports socialism everywhere in the world ex- 
cept where it is already being built. Known 
foi Its eclectic positions and its hostility to 
other left forms. The Militant is popular 
among undergraduates who have never 
!)fien exposed to anything else. -Touting 
.isf'f as A Sociiilist Newsweekly Publish- 
.;(l In The Interests Of The Working Peo- 
ple " one is apt to find within its pages 
more on Hugo Blanco and sex preference 
issues tfian articles of interest to "Ths 
Working People." 

People s World. Weekly newspaper 
published by the CPUSA and sister organ 
to the Daily World. Appearing to be to the 

The Communist: Organ of the Workers 
Congress (Marxist-Leninist). A Maoist 
splinter group in opposition to the CPML, 
the WCML specializes in polemics as 
evidenced by the extensive unsigned 
theoretical analyses published in The Com- 
munist. Seen or^^aisionally on campus. 



this paper is geared for people who share 
the WCML's burning hatred of oppor- 
tunism and have plenty of time on their 
hands to wade through and absorb their 
rt>etoric. 

Daily Worid: The only leftist daily in the 
country, systematically excluded from this 
campus for its pro- Soviet point of view. 
Published by the Communist Party USA, 
the Daily Worid is gaining grour>d and 
readership in New York due to the 
pressmen's strike. Presenting a workir>g 
dass perspective on the news in a graphic 
format not unlike any large metropolitan 
tabloid, the Daily World is surprisingly in- 
offensive to working (people ar>d palatable 
to students. Denounced by tfte Maoist and 
Trotskyite left for its support of reforms, 
tf>e Daily Worid does not engage in 
polemic battles with other groups or 
papers. Features include weekly magazine 
•upplenr>ents and the only sports page on 
the left. 



Guardian: Independent radical 
newsweekly run almost singlehandedly by 
Irwin Silber. Perhaps the rrK>st popular lef- 
tist r>ewspaper on this campus with strong 
support among grad students and pro- 
fessors in social sciences. Forrr>erly the 
spokespaper for the Maoist left in America,, 
the Guardian rr^aintains its independent 
position by refusing to take sides eith any of 
the Maoist splinter groups. Noted for its ex- 
tensive coverage of the national liberation 
struggles around the world, the Guardian 
has recently raised the ire of the CMPL for 
Its failure to supF>ort China's role in Africa 
Maintaining a sense of fairness by 
publishing advertisements in its classified 
se' tion by a variety of radical groups, the 
Guardian hopes to become the first 
mainstream radical newspaper in America 

We could do worse. 



Socialist Tribune: Bi-monthly publication 
of tfie Socialist Party USA noted for its 
noil sertanan approach and broad appeal. 
The Socialist Tribune is a highly readable 
newspaper that refrains from the infantile 
in fighting that plagues much of the left. 
Presenting the news from a socialist view- 
point without offending the sensibilities of 
the reader or "forgetting" to give their 
wnters credit, the Socialist Tribune is 
unavailable on campus Though its layout 
is a bit amateurish perhaps reflecting the 
age and^or inexperience of the people put- 
ting it out, it is a reasonably responsible 
paper. 

Revolution Monthly newspaper of tfie 
Revolutionary Communit Party, mortal 
enemy of the CPML. The RCP supports the 
Gang of Four to the CPML's Hua, making 
for an interesting but relatively inconse 
quential ideological battle. Fetishizing the 
image of Mao-Tse-Tung, the RCP is the 
most visible radical group on campus. No 
bylines and an over-riding concern for tell- 
ing the "truth" are characteristics of this 
paper, but it is the paper's preoccupation 
with revolutionary imagery that gives it its 
identity. The RCP lately seems to think it is 
nK)re important for American workers to 
remember Mao than it is for them to fight 
for their class interests 



Socialist Worker Official American- 
ediiion monthly of the International 
Socialist Organization. Though it presents 
J rather eclectic program, the ISO refrains 
from ttie denunciaory approach of the 
oitier Trotskyist organizations. Plenty of 
pictures laid out within a slick graphic for 
m.ii make it an attractive paper to read and 
h.is ijecome tfie preferred paper of the in- 
leiiiJtional socialist jet set. Available on 
Ccimpus when its dealers come around. 
Workers Vanguard; Represents the inter 
iiiitKinal Spartacist tendency" within Trot 
skyism on a bi weekly basis as tne organ of 
the Spartacist League Graphicaly designed 
to be mistaken for the Militant, the 
Workers Vanguard is perhaps the most 
infianimatory paper available on campus. 
Featuring spectacular exposes of other left 
groups on a regular basis, the SL and its 
appendage organ are the most suspicous 
entities on the left. Watch out that they 
don't get you on their mailing list; they 
have been known to pay personal, unan- 
nounced visits to students in the dorms. 




if 









^d j^'- 



•Wtfi 



•^i J 







A-W, Collegian, Sept. 5. tSTff 



Mass Revi>w 



Continuad from oaae 8 

publication has attempted anything like 
that," Hicks said. 

The special issues included original by and 
interviews with Ralph Ellison and 1977 
National Book Award winner Toni 
Morrison. 

The next 
1978, will 




special issue, due in Winter of 
be an issue on the state of 
photographic art in America, and will 
feature the works of photographers such as 
Walker Evans, August Sander. Helen 
Sally Stein, John Szarowski, and 
by Maren Stange, Wright Morris. 
Halley. Allen Trachtenberg and 



Levitt 
essays 
Anne 
others. 



The Review has a circulation of a little 
over 2000 copies per issue, of which about 
1200 go to libraries including the British 
Museum It is circulated to every state in 
the union, and to 39 countries as well, and 
it is sold on newsstands m New York. 
Chicago, San Francisco, and Los Angeles. 

It's a highlv discriminating publication." 
Hicks said 

Now supported by monev from tfte five 
colleges m the Valley and National Endow- 
Tient for the Arts grants, the Review is m 
::orporated as an exceedingly non profit 
organization according to Hicks 

Hicks also said that the Review has 
received "very firm support from the beqin 
nmg by the Alumni Association T he v have 
alwavs given great encouragement anrt 
.".ome iMt)nfv 

The Review kva« somewr>d! onstaole 
fin.- ■ 'S 

dt ie 

DUblicaiton and a fndndsomer one i nere 
•vere guvs v. no were wimnq to take out se 
corxl niorfqa<»8 on tneir houses to oay the 
O'" ■ • Hicks S«Md. 

' ^-nds 01 the Ri»w)«tw nHurt* 

Robert Frost, whom Hicks aescrioea as a 

•ff Ar- 

nwav, 

wr>om HicNS uescnoea as a great 



I ht? Review has had the same graphic 
format since its inception, and is recogniz- 
ed as a pioneer in using drawing and prints 
extensively in the pages of a quarterly. 
Robert Tucker, another editor, descnbed 
the philosophy behind the Review's 
dedication to handsome printing and its 
cost last year: "We early determined to 
print as fine as we could, givep our means, 
and we have continued that practice. At 
first, we printed fine without honoraria (ex 
cept extra issues) to contributors We now 
award a small hononum to each contributor 
($50 00 for articles and short stories and ar 
tides, eg); the token is small because of 
the quite costly (but valuable) pnnciple of 
fine printing. 
Hicks also sees the Review as a way "to 
recruit distinguished faculty or tf»e best o' 
the ° promising young people out o 
graduate school ' 
While the Review has published some of 
the finest writers, social thinkers, and ar 
tists in the world over the past twenty 
years, the publication is not closed to new 
talent 

■ What we are also trying to do is keep it 
open to promising young artists who the 
world doesn't know vet. ■ Hicks said. 
The latest issue of the Review, Summer 
1978 ts still available, and can be purchas 
ed at the University Store It includes an ar 
trcie on composer Franz Schubert, called 
'Schubert s Last Year '828 " written by 
Amheist College music professor Henry G. 
Mishkin This is the 150th anniversary of 
Schubert's death. 
Also included is poetry, short «:tones. 
I ism an article entitle Regional P'ann 
mg The Need and How to Meet it by 
0, . ... ., . , Robinson a teacher at Smith 
C piece on higr>er education m 

AHiertCd and the Unviersity ut 
Ma&!>dChu»etts called "The Ivory Tower of 
Bab^," by former UMass professor Milton 
Mwer 



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Sept 5, 1978. Collegian A 11 






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MSNU SA 

Car bur s 27 page menu f ■ • ; ■ 

veqetarians a page fuH of f'> * 4 salad plates, a 

page of delicious made-from-scjatcM soups and Sid*» o^ 
and a page |usl for !h(- Kids 

Below are )ust a few of our most popular selections 



THE U MASSED FOR IT 

(You Got It) 

Roast beef, sliced turkey breast, lettuce. 

tomato & horseradish mayo. 



THE PIONEER VALLEY 
(Massachusetts' biggest ski* area— bring 
your own Poles) 

Shrimp salad, crab meat, salad, lettuce 
and tomato. 



THE SWINGERS CLUB 

^Please Bare With Us) 

Beef, shrimp salad, ham. lettuce, tomato &. 

Sue's Sauce. 




The Last 

Sus] 

< le thi« a hi 



Corn b«f. »wiM , 
wirh R(t»kif dr<j 



A-12, Collegian, Sept 5, 1978 



THE 
SHA66S 




Contin 

createtl 
no tntf I 
sound 
bound 

niusir 

have 

years 

Hani( 

theni 

done 

I M- 

ciHili : 
Dot V 
f.tni!' 
Mt'v. 
t( in 
With r 
w;jnf ■, 
v\,c • 

It..' i 

thf ■ 
th,. t 

phii.. 

I 

tt>,n 



ued from page 3 

v^/ith zero degree of self consciousness; there is 

'! here to be funny The beauty of The Shaggs" 

!hat they seem to have not been influenced or 

i)V any musical traditions whatsoever Their 

• tally instincitive. Punk rockers the world over 

trying their hardest to sound this bad for 

three young sisters from a tiny town in New 

sound worse than the rpost tuneless of 

out even trying' Couldn't have been better 

vere bogus 

hat Jon Landau or Dave Marsh or someone 

a better personality profile than I based on 

s lyrics, hut It does t,eem as if the Wiggin 

i rather sheltered life up there in the colds of 

hire Dot's philosophy of the world referred 

He of the record, for (ostance, provides us 

Mh shattering revelation that "the fat people 

• the skinny people got and the skinny people 

he fat people got the rich people want what 

:" got and the i want what 

iot.'etal Doro; . ohavefeitat 

se songs were penned much of the same 

I ifiqiiisitiveness at)out the world that all 

'' ■ ;• rice ffel at s.nie point during tlieir 

usual dh(Hit that But you have 



h.lvO ciuiti 



,,< 



y on two independent visits to the Wig 
ie by a fnend of mine and thj' cthtr 
t the rock band NRBQ I have com. .,; 
'^ at th :v incredible 



h 



It'' 



.V 



up as a fabulous rtauU bf the rampant Do 
— which swept tb* -• • 
The mid 'fiO's i 

•he earl^st possible datf 

Shaggs were still toaether m a band Mr 

•fa darv 
'n out CL. 
day fcver since I first heard this story, my 

'tously inf^ted with vtsior^ of '' 

f 6to4 

•rf" album's worth of 
:. ;, -.< ...,,ns had been left in 

• ' "t.nw when she left for a vacation. When shr 

' had lieen robt) 
those tapes Im 

* thief s surprise when 

y\ a single. dpparui>tly My Pal Foot 
Why Do I Feei;*' . was released at one point. 

nn Third World but on Fleetwood Records, 
nntpd for sports altnims like Havlicek Stole 
The Ball nu) The Amazing Mets. Fleetwood is aware 

• but IS releasing nothing at this time, if they 
any copies left 

Uf ! i> writing 



Foct 




DO YOUR 
PENANCE 



join tfte 








^ 






1 


^^ 




5."" 


i^m^ 




-:^ 


^ 



IP COOL WHILE YOU CRAM! 

Rent a mini refrigerator -an 
ideal wvjy to keep drinks (t 
goodies on ide - right in your 
room! 2 spacious shelves; 2 
bottle racks; 2 freezer ice culie 
trays Ad|ustable thermostat. 

Studant Prica: 

$22.00 
per semester 



lAYlOR RiNTAL 

299RussallRd.,Hadley 
Se4-42S0 



BUS DRIVERS WANTED 



Five College Buses need drivers for Fall Tferm. 

AppUcant must be a Registered Student at one of 
Five Colleges with at least three terms to go and 
MUST HAVE a MASS CLASS 2 drivers Uoeiise. 

Call Five College Transportation Office— 586 4282 
(Mon Fri 9:00-4:00)— for application and appoint- 
ments for interview and driving test. 




MCAT 

LSAT 

GMAT 

PCAT 

OCAT 



NMB 
I, II, Hi 

ECFMG 
FLEX 



VAT/NLE 




TEST PREPARATION 
SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938 



5la/nfiey-H. 




Educational Center 

Call Days Eveninfs & Weekends 

264 N. Pleasant St. 
Amherst, Mass. 

413-2S3-5108 



Special courses for tall exams 
LSATGREMCATGMAT 
Enroll now' 



For Information AboulOther Centers 

In Maior US Cities & Abroad 

3ut >»de NY Slate 

CALL TOLL FREE: lOO-lZS-l?!? 



Sept. 5, 1978, Collegian, A-13 



\'X 






o.«orTMt«TO» • SHOP co-^ANies 



• • 



Stop& Shop"GreatBeef"USDA Choice 

Beef' 
Roast 

2^° Ground Beef 4»« 

♦Contains not more than 26% fat - Sold in 51b. pkgs. only. ^ 

^m Glory Bacon 'I&' 99 

stop & Shop Pastromi 



Av<ulab(e m stores S 
with service delis 



1.69 






Fresh Flounder Fillets 
=2.99ib 



SUP€RMABKETS 



•"tit All ((.J^OS l«^4TVt*d Hut 






Enf 
Muff 

Stop& Shop-Reg. or Split-12oz. pkg. of 6 

Dozen Grade "A" Stop & Shop 

Large Eggs 



Stop& 
Shop 



V 



Orange 
Jutee 




Stop & Shop Coupon l(Vj||j||^fj^J^^ 

'WrtS ftw coupon and a %7 50 pinch,ib»- 

FREE! 

English Muffins 

Stop & Shop-Reg or Split- 1 2oz pkg of 6 g;J 
,ULS10P« Shop Co^nJ J(^^^|Jiy,M 

W•I^ itvs coup> n and a S7 50 purchase G-~3 

oz. Large 

stop & Shop 
Grade "A" 




. ni S-l* 'j^n'* 




■ ,4^t 4 L tfTMt ono par c 



Frozen 
12oz. can 



Frozen 

JOCK) Sun •ifX i Val S«>t » L«l<« or* par ctiuafim 



1 8 o unce package 

Wheades 

Whole Wheat Flakes 



Stop & Shop-Grade "AA" 

Butter 

93 Score- 1 lb. pkg. qtr. lb. sticks 




EOWW 

^y ; stop * Shop Coupon J AJ^eljLlAjfcJ, 

Witt> iif»s coupon and a $7 50 pur er — « ^ Z 

Orange Juice ^i 

stop & Shop JB mK |:! 
12oz. can MBnV ^1 



I 




(jrstop* Shop CouporTi^jj^^^^\( 

^ ^itfTmis coupon ^ a |7 50 porchase ^_^ 

Wheaties Cereal ^ 

Whole Wheat ^^%f& 
Flakes ABBV i^ 

18 ounce pKg ^1%^^ 5^ 



, WTOJ^^DWWl' ^ 



IjckWi St op & Sho p Cgupo n \^,^ 

With this coupon and a $7 50 purchase 

1 lb. pkg. Butter 

stop & Shop 

93 Score Grade AA 
Quarter lb. Sticks 




>>.1.1 ^^i' S«'0! t !:>.t' ^T * I 



891 

292£~ 



101b. bag Eastern 



PS"< 







klAiiddrs'°p « Shop c^polTj^^tJiygc]" 

* With this coupon and a S7 50 t *" — — 

|10 pound bag 
Potatoes 

Eastern 

us No 1 



■ i ' * Sh* •-w-i • 



59 



gi: 



with coupon ^'^^-^'iWWWl^V^ 

■ ^BWI V*IHiJK-IUB dF]i^ MB ** ■SLjIV ^ ^ *■ 4BJIB JVLjHUiM ■■ ^iwm tmtmm i 
^^^^^^[stopTshop"Couponl(^^^^U^4:^^!^iJi(ldd.l^'oP * Shop Coupon jii((^iti^j^Cj|^y^((i^ & Shop goupon]li^((^ 



With this roiipon 




With this caipon 



^ir3 



With »his I'M ipc^ 



, Shop Coupon Jtitldtld 

^ SAVE 15^ £!^ SAVE 15' £|3 SAVE35 Sl^ SAVE35^ | 

fe 24 ounce bottle ^R 2 pound package S^\^ 100 count bottle ^|-^ 40 count package gz^ 

i3 Log Cabin g|3 Log Cabin Pancake f\^ Bayer gi::| Efferdent Den u re ^i 

|3 Syrup 294BJ and Waffle Mix 295£i| Aspinn 296|:}^ Cle aning Tab lets |^i 

i^itid "fs'oP * Shop Ccu"^n^j[^"^^]l^ijj[^Il[Ttop 4 ShotTcoupon vl.l,lAv3^W*^^' ^'"^^'°^' * ^^"^' ^^ 

^ SAVE30' ?!- SAVE20 £"- SAVEIO* kj SAVE25 s^ 

9'^ofS^pk^Mor?8ri's ^^ 1 6 ounce pkg French s g|3 B«^»V C^^^^^M3^^oz pkg g|-| 64 oz^^^ 




izg Steak House p\4 Big Tate 

i3 Steak Platter 29bEi3 Mashed Potatoes 

l-l^^KMiravWTil — ,. . kTVf\1\1M 9taa«l 



I 
I 



Blueberry 
Muffin Mix 



200 SI 



Liquid All ^| 

Laundry Detergent P% 



a , X,. r »..r^ ..^.l s. . ^!^ .,V"v.'. ^'. ..... . ..,". nT 299J-S ■ .„^^v;;s;;r_^,_;_. ...■ '^tS. •■ ■ ■■- ■ ' ■■■ -."... -.I ■... -.>. ....,"... 201| 



A 14 Collegian. Sept 5, 1978 



Sept. 5. 1978. Collegian, A 15 



ten singles 



By PHILIP MIL STEIN 
The big hit records, the ones in the charts 
and on the radio, everybody knows about 
and so I feel no obligation to talk about 
them What follows, therefore, aredescnp 
tions of the ten singles which have meant 
the most to me so far this year Although 
tfwre haven t been as many 45s released in 
1978 as there were in '77, the quality at the 
bottom of the list has vastly improved, and 
checking against last year's list I think the 
top ten has better records, also. And con 
sidering that ®77 was or>e of the greatest 
years in history for the rocknroH sinijle ii 
seems as if "78 is going to hp really 
something! 

Jetf Scott and Josef Mari ; t- /t.e I 
Like (Mirror) I know nothing about these 
two guys except that they are obscure 
popmeisters of the highest order' I bought 
their five sor^ EP to he«r their v^ston of 



I'll Be Your 

, offer a gr*>at 

er-naming four 

Bouncy ar 

iiuitars. wintpy 

•; pop are here. 

-. JUS.'' 



The Velvet Und- 

Mif'or ' and ah' 

. '-d up renditK ' 

^ are even i,t i 

nu-nts, stingtnq 

. all the rules ♦ 

•'le songs are fLi' 

X Ray Spex "Oh Bondage Up Yours" 

(Virgin) Poly Styrene is a star if we < ould 

only define star as those who should be 

fanK>us and not those who are Her voice 

breaks and cracks and squeaks all over the 

place, and the band chugs along with the 

force and grace of a steamroller at 70mph' 

Great "modern world lyrics, too 

Bu//cocks What Do I Get'" (United Ar 
tists) One of the few British bands thiat can 
conibine intelligence, humor and great 
rock The Bu//cocks have turned out a 
beauty of a single, with shrug it all off lines 
like "I iust want a lover like any other what 
do I get'" arwl a surf guitar break that's 
almost as good as Tf>e Velvets' in Tm Set 
Free" 



Generation X "Ready Steady Go" 
IChrysalisI Thick and churning, this ode to 
the big stars of the Sixties is expecially 
refreshing compared to everybody else's 

screw the past " attitude Generation X 
have been critici/ed for being too self 
consciously mod. yet despite my never 
ending battle against such exploitation I 
don't ntind one bit Good music ronquers 
all I quess 



...it seems as if '78 
is going to be really 
something 



tiectnc Chairs Eddie 5 Sheena' 
tSafan) Lead smger Wayne County has 
dropped his drag routine, liut he has for 
tunatcly retained his sense of humor and 
h>s love .»nd rest>ett for rock Using an 
ama/inqly accurate Buddy Holly voice 
(I . ' ! htccups) County 

t.i vS punk t)uttles in 

his adopted Engiano, before the song 
breaks wide open into a great Sex P'«-'<<|'^ 
rave up 

Wreckless Eric Reconne/ Chen*,' 
(Stiff) A delightful recollection of a 
teenage love affair, rendered with 
Wreckless' standard gritty. rrackling 
vocals The nian has done it aQain' I only 
wish I could decipher the Frer»;h bits. 

Earle Mankey Mau Mau' (Bomp) 
Formerly with Sparks, Mankey is a studio 
magician (he s worked with everyone from 
Elton John and T^te Beach Boys to Mumps 
and The Dickons), and his first land still 
latest) singiu « a studio magic It's m a pop 
vain and is cliched throughout, but like the 
otfwr records m this list it bears a certain m 
tangible freshness noX found in any Top 40 
charts these days 



Magazine "Shot By Both Sides" (Virgin) 
An ascending guitar line, a drained vocal, 
an intellectual lyric and, as you might ex 
p)ect from such a combination, the result is 
an unusual song Wierd does not necessari 
ly mean good, of course, but in this case 
the two work well together and, as you 
might not expect, it is all surprisingly 
listenable 

Wa/mo Nan/ "Tele Tele Telephone" 
(Fiction) Although almost all of the records 
on this list have excellent flip sides, this is 
the only one where the B side actually ex 
ceeds the A Both are quirky yet bouncy 
tunes, with stuttering hook lines and lyrics 
ihout girls But in place of the disco-funk 
of side one, 'Gadabout" is purely rock 
oriented, and it really packs a punch. Wa/ 
mo has been called The American Elvis 
(Costelloi t)ut Talking Heads is a much 
more accurate reference point 

Patu Smith Group "Because The Night" 
(Arista) The only hit on the list, but it is 
also one of the only rock hits of the year, 
with perhaps only It's A Heartache" |Oin 
ing It Though this is Patti's pop mos* sf 
fort. It does not shy away from motion, and 
features a maiestic intro And it sounds even 
lietter coming out of a radio than it does off a 
turntaNe' 

In a year such as this one, narrowing all 
those records down to just ten is such a 
tough thing to do, and I don t agree with 
the result each time I see it So in case I left 
off some singles that come December I 11 
feel I shouldn't have. I'll finish wth a short 
enumeration of some very honorable men 
tions 

Clash Clash City Rockers" (CBS); Radio 
Stars "Nervous Wreck" (Chiswick); X 
Ray Spex "The Day The World Turned 
Day Glo (EMI); Fast "Its Like Love' 
(Ram); Pezband 'Stop' Wait A Minute" 
(Passport) Plastic Bertrand Ca Plane 
Pour Moi' (Sire); Residents 

Satisfaction" (Ralph). 



area 



(Information in the following 
Restaurant Review was com- 
piled by the author over the 
summer. Prices quoted include 
I drink, dinner, coffee and 
dessert, and tip for one per- 
son. 



Amherst 

Amherst Deli. Carnage 
Shops. Good sandwiches, 
bagels, coffee. pastry. 
$1 75-2. 50 a sandwich. 
Bell's Pizza House. 65 
University Drive. 
Charlie's. I Pray. $10 * range. 
Chequers Restaurant. 
University Drive 
Delano's 57 N Pleasant St. 
S6 JO range Adequate ham- 
burger onilett nwnu Specials 
good A good place to take 
your mother or a date 
Drake. The 85 Amity Large 
beers. Bland mexican food 
$2-3 for lunch 

Eric's Food Shop. 314 Col 
lege Reportedly good lunch 
specials $2-3 range 
F b S Restaurant Corp E 
Pleasant 

Gas Light I. 36 Mam 
American food free coffee 
refills $2-3 lunches 
Gas Light 2. 168 N Pleasant. 
Same as 91 Good cole slaw. 
Grist Milt Mill Valley \Rt. 
II6\ Reportedly good. $10 
range. 

The Hideout 103 Pleasant 
Hunan Garden. 10 Belcher- 
town Rd. Good Seuchuan- 
Hunan $10 range 
The Hungry U II. 55 Universi- 
ty Drive. $3-5 range. 
Judie's. 51 N. Pleasant. 
$10 ^ dinner. French-style. 
Reportedly mixed some v. 
good, some mediocere. 
Kim Toy Restaurant. 32 Ami- 
ty. • 



WELCOME BACK FOR A 
GREAT FALL 1978! 

University Food Services 



DIIMIIMG COMMONS 
Board Plan eating at: its 

Full Menu Options 
' Luncheon Sand\A/ich Bar 



-Dinner Salad Bars 

Vegetarian Foods in two connnnons 

IMOIM-BOARD STUOEIMTS 
If you're not on a meal plan, 
remember the convenience 
and delicious menus of the 

01IIIII6 COMMOMS I 

CASH FBICBS 

breakfast $1.S5 

lUBCh 2SS 

iMtr 3-40 

or save $ witk 5 -Meal Strip Tickets 

Skrcakfasts .... $ 9.00 
SlMBckes 11.00 

StfiMSrs 10.00 

SKosker iliMers . . .. 10.^0 



Dining Commons Hours. . . 



WORCESTER. HAMPSHIRE 



breakfast 


7: 


OOam - 


10 


:30 am 


lunch 
dinnar 


11: 

4: 


15am - 
OOpm — 


2 

6: 


OOpm 
30pm 


FRANKLIN. BERKSHIRE 
lunch 10:30am - 
dinner 4:OOpm - 


2:OOprn 
7: OOpm 


Saturday ft 


Sunday 






brunch 
dinner 


1i:OOam - 
4: OOpm - 


1 

6 


.30pm 
* 30pm 


HAMPDEN 










Monday 


- F 


riday 






kosher dinners 5 


OOpm 


6 


30pm 



DAILY 

MENU 

RECORDING 

CALL 
545 2626 



Old Fashioned Bakeries right on campus! 
WORCESTER SNACK BAR 
HAMPDEN MUNCHYS 

have TAKE-OUT BAKERIES 
Fresh Baked Daily 





SNACK BARS 


Worcester 

Hampden 

Whitmore 


7:OOam to 10'30pm (every day) 
7:30am to 1 '.OOam (every day) 
7:OOam to 4:30pm (iVIon. Fri.) 




MUNCHYS STORES 


Worcester. 

Franklin 
Hampden 


10:00am to 11 .OOpm OPEN 
8 '.OOam to 8:OOpm 7 days 
8;OOam to 8:OOpm a week! 



restaurants 



The Lord Jeffrey Inn. 30 

Boltwood. $10^ dinners. 
Reportedly good. 
James A. McManus. 410 
Northampton Rd. 24-hour 
eating. 

Pizzarama. College. 
Rooster's. 1177 N. Pleasant. 
Rusty Scupper Restaurant. 
525 Belchertown Rd. $10 din- 
ners. Good cheese-cracker oar 
upstairs Fn. & Sat night date- 
place. Same food as any R. S. 
The Steak Out 351 Nor- 
thampton Rd. $8 K) dinner. 
Good salad bar Standard 
American food 

Subway. 33 E Pleasant 
Sand $.99-139 Subs. 
$1. 89tsh Black olives - nice 
touch. 

Superior PIzfa I7B Mon- 
tague. 

The Restaurant 159 N. Plea 
sant. Sandwiches and salads. 
$2 3 lunch. 

Time Out. 37 N Pleasant. 
Good peanuts. 

University Pizza 173 Sunset 
Ave 

Whole Wheat Pizza Factory. 
363 Mam Delivery $3 5 per- 
too expensive but health-foody 
and good tasting 



Northampton 

Jack August Original 
Seafood 5 Bridge. Some sav 
the best seafood m area. They 
dose ar 8 PM or so, so I've 
never gotten to find out 
Bagel Deli 28 Pleasant. Good 
bagels ! * marks for correct 
spelling], good coffee. 
The Bamboo Hut. 36 King. 
Bay State Hotel of Nor- 
inc. 41 Strong 



140 Mam. $10 + 



thampton. 

Ave 

Beardsley's. 

for dinners. 

Bizz's Snack Bar. 17 King. 
Bluebonnet Diner 324 King. 
Burger King Corp. 344 King. 
What you'd expect 



Carlo of Naples. 45 State. 
$8-10 dinner. Looks good. 
Colonial Hilton. Rt. 91 inter- 
change. 

Farm Shop Nampton Plaza 
Five Ninety One Food Shop. 
F*leasant. 

Florentine Room, 32^ King. 
Friendly Ice Cream. 63 King. 
What you 'd expect 
Harvard Pizza. 257 Main 
Jim Dandy Fried Chicken. 
214 King. 

Joe's Cafe Spaghetti and 
Pizza House. 33 Market. 
Kenny's Restaurant. 235 
Mam 

Kentucky Fried Chicken. ISO 
King. 

McDonald's. 221 King. Need 
I say more? 

Middle Earth Lounge. 76 
Pleasant. Sandwiches, etc. 
$3-5 dinner. Nice ambiance. 
Food good in its league, ex- 
ecution. 

Mt. Steak 261 King. 
Packard's. 14 Masonic. Nice 
decor, avg. drink prices but 
healthy drinks. 
Page's Loft. Interchange 91. 
The Pier. 5 /v. King 
Pizza Express. 71 Pleasant. 
Red Lion. 24 hrs Great place 
for greasy spoon Kerouac 
Lovers, undistinguished food 
but that's not why you're here. 
St. Regis. 76 Pleasant. Good 
breakast -a pleasure to watch 
a trained and experienced staff 
in action. Surmise dinners $10 
range but prob good 
The Soup Kitchen. 159 Mam 
Homemade soups, salads $3-5 
range I ''I 

Subway. 72 King. Prob. same 
as Amherst branch. 
Taco Villa. 21 Center Well 
seasoned food, everything but 
the tortillas made on premises. 
$3-5 dinner. Recommended. 
The Captain's Table. 48 
Damon Rd. 
Wiggens Tavern. 36 King. 





Zorba s Taverna. 8 Green ^t. 
Excellent pizza, greek 
specialities. Try the greek 
salads. $5-8 dinners. 
Sheehan's. Pleasant St. 
Remodeled old men s bar with 
once working items reduced to 
antigue status. Good 
bartender, probl. good food. 



Hadley 

Aqua Vitae. Russell \Rt 9]. 

Italian. 

Bonanza Sirloin Pit. Mt. 

Farms Mall. Standard. 

Burger King Store no. 803. 

Mt Farms Mall Like the other 

802 

Campus Pizza. 206 Russell. 

Elmwood Inn. Russell 

Hahjee's Place 206 Russell 

Persian, American, hippy. 

You'll never exhaust their 

menu. 

Hardee's. 480 Russell 

Howard Johnson's. 401 

Russell Yes. 

Jolly Bull Restaurant. 322 

Russell. $5.95 Lobster 

special * . Live music 

weekends. $810 dinner. 

McDonalds. 377 Russell 

Over 7 million... 

Pizza Hut. 424 Russell FOOD 

& LIQUORS tempting 

The Stable Food Shopps. 

326 Russell 

The Wok. Rt 9. Home style 

Chinese Reportedly excellent. 

$5-8 dinners 



TO-SGNOOL 




old. 



ftAVE«3 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 
"LITTLE PROFESSOR" 
CALCULATORS 

Dationed for 'children 4 to 9 
"UttM Profsssor" gtof t— a Mquanca of 
matttematicat problems g— re d to the chM's 
level of skit). Over 16,000 preprogrammed 
probleme for the child to aolve. 

SAVE*5 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 
CALCULATORS 
MODEL SR-40 



19.88 



rag. 24.88 



BIG SCHOOL 
SPECIAL reg «• 

Contains two medium point and one 
fine point ball pens. 

DOODLE PADS reg ••ST* 

100 sheets of paper per pad. SV^xll 
Takes bail point, crayon or pencil. 



TYPING PAPER reg st^TT* 

Standard 8 % x1 1 size white bond paper. 
Big 200 sheet pack. 



LOOSE LEAF 
BINDERS 



791.17 



12-PACK PENCILS reo » 

12 degree, yellow barrel pencils with 



VALUE PAK CONSTRUCTION 
PAPER .eoSB'37* 

S2 colorful Value Pak construction 
sheets per package. 9"x12" size. 



3-ring heavy-duty vinyl covered. Hokis 
all standard filler paper. 



USE YOUR STORE CHARGE, 
VISA OR MASTERCHARGE 




Features 48 functions ir>cluding 
percent, constant, roots ar>d powders, trig 
functkms, togatithrm and more. Rechargeable 
with AC adapter/charger included. 

SAVE *10 

UNISON1CXL101 

DESK TOP CALCULATORS 



24.88 



reg. 34.88 



This compact daak-top calculator ie Meal for 
office of home uaa. Features kKluda lO-cM 
capacity, ful 4-kay memory, paroant kay wRh 
mark-up and dtooourrt capacity, Delia % key, 
groaa profH margin key, and item count 
key. Oversized keyboard ia aaay-to-uaa. dis- 
play ia eaay to read. Battery " 



Optional AC adapter available 5.88 



A- 16. Collegian. Sept 5. 1978 



FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 1 

800 pm Commonwealth Stage 
1978 Preview Performance. WHO'S 
AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF?; 
Rand Theater, Fine Aru Center. 
University 

SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 2 
8:00 pm Comownwealth Stage 

1978 Preview Perlormance, WHO'S 
AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF?; 
RarxJ Theater. Fir>e Arts Center. 
University 



SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER 3 
800 pm WHO'S AFRAID OF 
VIRGINIA WOOLF?: $see9-1 notice 

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5 

800 pm WHO'S AFRAID OF 

VIRGINIA W00LF7; see 9-1 notice 

WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 6 

11 am WALK-IN REGISTRATION 
for Performing Arts Division music 
study (group study until 9-22; private 
study ongoing), until 4 pm, Monday 
through Friday; Old Chapel, 
University 

5:00. 7:46 & 10:» pm Film. THE 
RULING CLASS. SPONSORED BY 
OSC, Campus Center Auditorium, 
University 

800 pm WHO'S AFRAID OF 
VIRGINIA WOOLF?; fRand Theater, 
Fine Arts Center, University 

TMiiRSDAY. SEPTEMBFR 7 

7:00. 9:15, & 11:30 pm Film, NET 
WORK, Campus Center Auditonum, 
Univ. 

7 30 pm Fall Colloquy: REALITY- 
FANTASY begins with Hampshire 
convocation and runs through 
September 10 

8:00 pm - WHO'S AFRAID OF 
VIRGINIA WOOLF?; #Rand Theater, 
Fine Arts Center, University 
9: pm - Colloquy Event, THE 
HORIZON COMPANY: LASER 
FANTASIES, Dining Commons, 
Hampshire 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBERS 

All day - Fall Colloquy: REALTIY- 
FANTASY continues at Hampshire 
6:30, 9:00, b 11:15 pm Film, THE 
STING, sponsored by JFK-M, Cam- 
pus Center Aud., University. ... 

«:00 pm - WHO'S AFRAID OF 
VIRVINIA WOOLF?; Rand Theater, 
Fine Arts Center,- Univ. 
9:30 pm - Colloquy Event: THE 
HORIZON COMPANY: LASZR 
FANTASIES, Dining Commons. 
Hampshire 

10:00 pm - Film: BEAT THE DEVIL, 
Gamble Auditorium, Mount Holyoke 



SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 9 

All day - FaM Colloquy: REALT1Y- 

FANTASY continues at Hampshrie. 

Dance Buildir>g. Hampshire 

7:00, 9:00 £r 11:00 pm - Film. THE 

FRONT. WITH Woody Allen, 

spor>tored by Hillel. Student Unioi^ 

Ballroom, University 

7:30 and 9:30 pm - Film: SILENT 

MOVE. Gamble Auditorit. Mount 

Hotyokt 



8:00 pm WHO'S AFRAID OF 
VIRGINIA WOOLF?; Rand Theater, 
Fine Arts Cer^ter, University. 
8:15 pm Chamber Concert:' PHI LIPP 
NAEGELE, violin, Buckley Recital 
Hall, Music Center, Amherst. 

SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 10 

alt day Fall Colloquy: REALITY 

FANTASY CONTINUES AT 

Hampshire 

10:00 am - Colloquy Film and 

Discussion: SEABROOK, East 

Lecture Hall, Franklin Patterson Hall, 

Hampshire 

2 00 pm OPEN HOUSE AT THE 
Performing Arts Division with 
discussions and demonstrations by 
students concerning music study.. 
Old Chapel, Umv 

800 pm WHO'S AFRAID OF 
FIRGINIA WOOLKFO: Rand Theater. 
Fine Arts Center. University 



MONDAY. SEPTEMBER 11 

9:00-5 00 pm Imaginus. IrK.. ART 
EXHIBIT AND SALE, Davis 
Ballroom, Smith 

730 pm Auditions for THE HOB 
BIT. Patricia Gray's dramatiiation of 
J.R R Tolkein s story Scripts are 
available for perusal on a short term 
basis in \\\e Theater Departn>ent Of 
fice T205. between 8 X and 4 30 
weekdays Over 20 roles available for 
noen arMJ women. Open to anyone in 
the Five College arvl valley commum 
ty Performance dates: Dec. 1.2. 7 9, 
m Theater 14. Smith 
7:'30 pm Auditions for A DOLL S 
HOUSE, by Henrtk Ibcen. Scripts are 
available for perusal on a short term 
basis in the Theater Department Of 
fice T206. between 8 30 and 4 30 
weekdays Excellent roles for four 
women, three nr>en. extras Open to 
anyone in tf>e Five College and valley 
community Performance dates: Oct. 
27 29. Nov 2 4. in Theater 14. TV 
studio. Merxlenhall Center for tf>e 
Performir>g Arts (Theater Buildir>g) 
Smith. 

TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 12 

9:00-5:00 pm Imagmus. IrK., ART 
EXHIBIT AND SALE, Davis 
Ballroom, Smith 

7:X pm Auditions for Maquer** 
Dramatic Arts Department 
proiduction of SACPINO' by Frank 
OunkH> and Jim dale, directed by 
Susan Hunt, a comedy inspired by 
Molliere's "Les Fourbenes de 
Scapin." (To be presented on oct. 
20. 21 . 22 & 27. 28. 291 Kirby Theater 
Auditorium. Amherst. 
7:30 pm auditions for A DOLL'S 
HOUSE. BY Henri, Ibsen (see 9-11). 
Room 16, Ennily Dickir«on Hati. 
Hampshire CoHeoe 
7:30 pm Auditions for THE HOB- 
BIT, (see 9/11). Room 15, Emily 
Dickinson Hall, Hampshire College 

8:00 pm WHO'S AFRAID OF 
VIRGINIA WOOLF?, Rand Theater. 
Fir>e Arts Center, university 
9:00 pm - Film: SHOWBOAT. 
Gamble Aukitorium. Mount Holyoke 

WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 13 

7:00. 9:00 & 11:00 pm - FUm: 
SMOKEY AND THE BANDIT. 
SPONSORED BY Lambda Chi 
Alpha. Campus Center Auditorium, 
Univ. 

7:30 pm - Auditions for Masquer's 
Dramatic Arts Department 
production of SCAPINO!, (see 9- 12). 
Kirby Theater Auditorium, Ahmerst 
8:00 pm Lecture: RONALD PICK- 
VANCE. Chairman of Fine Art At 
Mount Holyokke, Lecture on Degas, 
manet, or Renori. Title to be an- 
nounced. Gamble Auditorium, 
Mount Holyoke 

8:00 pm - Film: MAD ADVENTURES 
OF RABBI JACOB. Wright Hall. 
Smith 

8:00 pm UMass Music Facultyb 
Recital. CHARLES LEHRER, OBOE, 
Bezanson ReciatI Hall. Fir>e Arts 
Center, Univ. 

8:00 pm WHO'S AFRAID OF 
VIRGINIA WOOLF?; Rand Theater. 
Fine Arts Center. Univ. 

THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 14 

■:00. 9:00,and 11:00 pm - Film: THE 

KING OF HEARTS, sponsored by G. 

Washington U, Campus Center Aud. 

Univ 

J:'M • Auditions for Masquer's 

Dramatic Arts department 

production of SCAPINO!, &(8ee 9- 

12). Kirby Theater Auditorium. 

Amherst 

8:00 pm - WHO'S AFRAID OF 

VIRGINIA WOOLF: Rand Theater, 

Pl iw Arts Center, Univ. 

9:00 pm - Film: JULES & JIM. 

Gamble Auditorium. Mount Holyoke 



FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 15 

7 00. 9 00 & 11:00 pm - Film: NEXT 
STOP GREENWICH VILLAGE. 
SPONSORED BY THE Pre Med 
Club, Campus Center Auditonum, 
Univ. 

7 00, 9:00 & 11:00 pm Film: NIGHT 
OF THE LIVING DEAD, SPON 
SORED BY THE Student Dietetic 
Association, thompson 104, Univ 
7:X, 930, and midnight - (bring ac- 
cessories). Films-ln-Discretion 
presents ROCKY HORROR PICTURE 
SHOW. Mam Lecture Hall. Hamp 
shire. 

7 30 pm Film: A TREE GOWS IN 
BROOKLYM,. - Gamble 
Auditorium, Mount Holyoke 
8:00 pm Campus Center program 
Council Presentation, TRENT 
ARTERBERRY MIME PER- 
FORMANCE. Student Union 
Ballroom, Univ. 

800 pm WHO'S AFRAID OF 
VIRGINIA WOOLF?: Rand Theater. 
Fine Arts Center, Univ. 



SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER It 

6 30, 9 00. b 11 15pm MARATHON 
MAN sponsored by Greenough 
House. Campus Center Auditorium. 
Univ 

7 M & 10:00 pm Film THE GOOD- 
BYE GIRL. Gamble Auditorium, 
Mount Holyoke 

7 30 and 9 30 pm Film: PADRE 
PADRONE. Sage Hall, Smith 

8:00 pm Department of Dance Con- 
cert: PLAYTHING OF THE WIND a 
darKe/ film /poetry presentation by 
Have Kohav; admission $2 50 for 
students and senior citizens. $3 50 
for others Theater 14, Smith. 

800 pm WHtTS AFRAID OF 
VIRGINIA WOOLF?; Rand Theater. 
Fine Arts Center, univ. 

8 15 pm Recital: SUSAN KURIAN, 
Flute. Buckley Reciatal Hall, Music 
Center. Amherst 

SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER 17 

8 00 pm Faculty Reciatal ERNST 
WALLFISCH, Associate Professor of 
Music, Smith College, vtola, and 
LORY WALLFISCH, Associate 
Professor of Music, Smith College. 
piarK). Sage Hall, mith 
8:00 pm WHO'S AFRAID OF 
VIRGINIA WOOLF?, Rand Theater, 
Firw Arts Center, univ. 

MONDAY. SEPTEMBER 18 

6 00 pm - LMass Music Theater 
Guild Auditions for Fall production of 
"aAnything Goes.: until 11 pm. Call 
586-5227 for information. Com- 
monwealth Room. Student Union, 
Univ. 

7:X pm Asian Studies Department 
Film: DERSU AZALA, Mead 
Auditorium. Arrtherst 

TUESDAY, SPETEMBER 19 

10:00 am to 5:00 pm SALE OF 
ORIENTAL ART, Marson Ltd., Art 
Museum Lobby, Mount Holyoke. 
6:00 pm • UMass Music Theater 
Guild AUDITIONS for Fall production 
of "Anythir>g Goes," until 11 pm (see 
9/ 18 notice) 

8:00 pm WHO s AFRAID OF 
VIRGINIA WOOLF?; Rand Theater. 
Fine Arts Center. Univ. 
9:00 pm - Film: WUTHERING 
HEIGHTS, Gamble Auditorium. 
Mount Holyoke 

WENDESDAY. SEPTEMBER 20 

7:00, 9:00 & 11:00 pm Film: MON- 
TY PYTHON AND THE HOLY 
GRAIL, for the benefit of UMass Ice 
Hockey Team. Campus Center Aud.. 
Univ. 

7:30 & 9:30 pm Film: THE 

AFRICAN QUEEN, admission $1, to 
benefit SOS, Wright Hall, Smith 
8:00 pm - UMass Music Faculty 
Recital, LINDA SMITH, BASSON, 
Bowker Auditorium, Univ. 
8:00 pm - WHO'S AFRAID OF 
VIRGINIA WOOLF?; Rand Theater. 
Fine Arts Center. Univ. 

THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 21 

7:30 pm - Hillel Foundation Film: THE 

MAD ADVENTURES OF RABBI 

JACOB, Merill II, Amherst 

8:00 pm - WHO'S AFRAID OF 

VIRGINIA WOOLF; Rand Theater. 

Fine Arts Center. Univ. 

8;15 pm - Concert: WARBEKE 

MEMORIAL CONCERT, The Tokyo 

string Ouartet Music by Mozart. Berg 

and Ravel; Chapin Auditorium, 

Mount Holyoke 

FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 22 
7:00, 9:15, & 11:30 pm - Film, THE 
GOODBYE GIRL. SPONSORED BY 
THE Campus Center Program 
Cour>cil, Campus Center Auditorium, 
Univ., 



7:30 pm - Film: FAR FROM THE 
MADDING CROWD, Gamble 
Auditorium. Mount Holyoke < 

7:30 & 9:45 pm Film THE KING 
AND I, admission $1. to benefit the 
Pre Medical society, Wright Hall. 
Smith 

7:'J0, 9:X and 12 midnight - Films-in- 
Discretion presents THE TIME 
MACHINE. Mam Lecture Hall. 
Hampshire 9 

8:00 pm WHO's AFRAID OF ' 
VIRGINIA WOOLF?. Rand Theater, 
Fine Arts Center, Univ. 

SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 23 

2:00 & 4:00 SOS Children's FUm 
Series: THE ABSENT-MINDED 
PROFESSOR. a</m/is/on S.75 to 
benefit People's Institute. Wright 
HeH. Smith 

7:00. 9 00 & 11:00 pm Film: 
WHAT'S UP DOC?, sponsored by 
Greyson House. Campus Center 
Auditorium. Univ. 

7:30 & 9:» pm FUm: LOVE & 
DEA TH, Gamble Auditorium, Mount 
Holyoke 

8:00 pm WHO S AFRAID OF 
VIRGINIA WOOLF?; Rand Theater. 
Fine Arts Center, Univ. 
8:15 pm Recital: KOURKEN 

DAGLIAN '80E, piano, Buckley 
Recital Hall. Music Center, 
Amhersat 

8:30 pm - Women's Coffeehouse, 
Lounge, Franklin Patterson Hall. 
Hampshire. Women interested in 
playing music, reading poetry, etc. 
can call the Women's Center 
\549-4600 ext. 540\. or just come to 
the coffeehouse. 
SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER 24 
11:00 am - Hillel Foundation Faculty- 
Student Brunch Discussion, Allen 
Weinstein. Professor of History, 
Smith College, aruj author of the 
recently published t>ook about Alger 
Hiss. " Perjury". The Gamut. 
Mendenhall Center for the Perform- 
ing Arts. Smith 

8:00 pm Recitel: PETER ARM- 
STRONG, Wesleyen University 
pterust in an all Busoni program, 
Sege HeM, Smith 

B.OO pm Fine Arts Center Concert 
Series, Concert Hall Series, BOBBY 
SHORT with Beveraty Peer, bass 
and Gene Gammege. drums. Con- 
cert Hall, Fine Arts Center, Univ. 
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 
8:00 pm Hillel Film Series, 
GENTLEMAN'S AGREEMENT, 
Thompson 104, Univ. 
TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 28 
8:00 pm Five College Insh Studies 
Seminar: MARY LAVIN reeding 
from her fiction. Browsing Room, 
Nielson Library, Smith College 
9:00 pm Film: ARSENIC Er OLD 
LACE, Gamble Auditorium, Mount 
Holyoke 

WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 27 
8:00 pm - UMass Music Faculty 
Recital. ESTELA OLEVSKY. piano, 
Bowker Aud., Urnv. 
8:00 pm - f/oe Arts Center Concert 
Series, Special Attractions, BALLET 
FOLKLORICO MEXICANO, 
Concert HaH, Fine Arts Center, Univ. 
THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 28 
6:00. 7:46, 9:30 & 11:15 pm - Film: 
PLAY IT AGAIN SAM, sponsored 
by Thoreau House, Campus Center 
Aud.. Univ. 

9:00 pm Film: GRAND ILLUSION, 
Gamble Auditorium. Mount Holyoke 
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 
7:30, 9:X & 12 midnight - Films-in- 
Discretion presents George Lucas' 
THX 1 138, Main Lecture Hall, Hamp- 
shire 

7:30 pm - Film: AS YOU LIKE IT. 
Gamble Auditorium, Mount Holyoke 
8:00 pm - Commonwealth Stage 1978 
Performance, MISALLIANCE; 
Rand Theater, Fine Arts Center, 
Univ. 

8:15 pm Faculty Recital: 

ADRIANNE GREENBAUM. 
flutish. CARLYLE HODGES. 
pianist. Music by Clenwnti, Hummel, 
Roussel, and Koechlin; Pratt 
Auditorium, Mount Holyoke 
SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 30 
6:30. 8:15, 10:00 & 11:15 pm - Film: 
BANANAS, sponsored by Beta Chi 
Campus Center Aud., Univ. 
7:00 & 9:30 pm - Film: THE LION IN 
WINTER: admission SI, to benefit 
SOS, Wright Hall, Smith 
7:30 £r 9:» pm - Film: I NEVER 
PROMISED YOU A ROSE 
GARDEN. Gamble Auditorium, 
Mount Holyoke 

8:00 pm - Commonwealth Stage 1978 
Preview Performance, 

MISALLIANCE, Rand Theater, Fine 
Arts Center, Univ. 

8:15 pm - Black Studies end Music 
Departments Concert: THE 
JOHNNY GIRFFIN ENSEMBLE, 
Buckley Recital Hat, Music Center, 
Amherst 



Collegian 



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HPf GAMO/ ir'5 ME, 

MR. PRESIDENT \QiAPP, 

RDR THE SeA€F/T <^ ^'^ 

SARLW(59 r*yr fam»li>m? 

WITH (JMASS... 



'FIRST THlMes FIRST.. 
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G0iN6 TO GET A . _ 
FIRST HAND LOOK aA^ "S^ 

THAN MR. HIP HI^PQi?9 



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OVER5 FROM A H0aSlM6 
>EVEU)PM£NT IN THE BRO^JX'.. 



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BUT DON'T BOTHEi?, NO 
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SOMPLAC£ £1? 
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, ..IE CAMERA WORK 
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RSO GROUPS 

Pages 
THE LIBRARY 

Page 16 



L2. Collegian, Sept. 5, 1978 



WHAT'S HIP AT U MASS 



«y MARK LECCESE, MICHAEL 
DOR AN, and BILL SUNOS TROM 

Let s face it, right at the start: We can all 
fget an education here, but we can't all 
make an impression. 

And that's important here at the end of 
"The Me Decade " Nobody wants to be 
one of the normal people - that's dull but 
I everybody wants to stand out, everybody 
wants to be admired, everybody wants to 
be respected — in short, everybody wants 
to make an impression. 

This IS not an easy thing. Everybody has, 
at one time or another, thought they were 
making an impression when what they 
were really doing was making an ass of 
themselves. There's a thin line. 

If you want to make an impression, there 
\ are certain things you have to do and cer 
tain rules you have to follow. Some things 
are in and some things are out; it's that sim- 
ple If you want to rrtake an impression, 
you ve got to do the in things 

All that stuff you used to hear about how 
you could rr>ake an impression by "being 
yourself." and "doing your own thing" just 
doesn t wash anymore, so f(yget it This is 
the 1970 s. and we play by tfie rules. Not 
playing by the rules is out. 

If you don't believe me, try walking across 
campus someday wearing a rugby shirt and 
painter s pants and carrying this month's 
Playboy, and see wfiat kind of looks you 
get 

What follows IS a brief guide to what's in 
and wfiat's out at UMass nght now. This 
run-down will be at le«t partially invalid 
Within a month things are coming in and 
going out everyday, so keep your eyes 
open 

Tf you follow this list, you will doubtlessly 
make an impression on all the people who 
matter, but follow it you must: anything 
you did might have been alright back in 
your old home town, but you're in the big 
leagues now, kid, and a few wrong moves 
could banish you to Sylvan forever. It hap- 
pened to David Bowie and it could happen 
to you. 

O K . here we go Fed free to take notes 
on what you think is important. 

Ten speed bicycles are out, as are cacti of 
any kind and talking to your plants And in 
stant coffee Living in Sylvan is out, as is 
living in Southwest, although having lived 
in Southwest and survived is m Greenough 
and Baker are m, but Butterfield is so out it 
isn't even funny. Livir>g in an "off campus 
dorm ' like Puffton Village or Bnttany 
Manor is out. Living in a house is m. and 
the farther away from campus the better. 
Amherst is out, but Sunderland, Belcher 
town and Leverett are in. 

Coming from a city is in, and so is coming 
from a farm. Coming from the suburt>s is 
out. The suburbs are out. Coming from 
out-of-state IS not automatically m, as 
some people think. Connecticut and Long 
Island are out, but New York City and 
Boston are in. And this is probably the only 
place on the East Coast where coming from 
th^]^id. West IS in. 



Out majors: Legal studies, political 
science, psychology, sociology, marketing, 
theatre, lournalism, theatre and phys ed. 

Ill majors: Animal science, plant and soil 
science, economics, social thought and 
political economy, classics, dance, 
chemistry, biochemistry and microbiology. 

Phony silk shirts are out for both men and 
women and oxford cloth button downs are 
111 Message tee shirts are out. Jerseys are 
out on men, in on women. Glasses are in 
and hats are out 

Hard rockers like Led Zepplin. Aerosmith, 
Boston and Jethro Tull are out, and so is 
Yes, the ELO and southern rock New 
Wave IS in. and Elvis Costello and the Talk 
ng Heads are very in Old Dylan is in, new 
Dylan is out Springsteen is coming in 
aiain. NRBQ is m. and Fat is out. Top 40 is 
way ou;, but so is so called "progressive" 
lock, and soft" rock, too. The Beatles will 
always be in, and Jackson Browne and 
James Taylor will always be out. Chick Cor 
ea IS out, and so are Anthony Braxton. 
Dave Brubeck. Stanley Clark, and Herbie 
Hancock Old Coltraine is m. and so are Ra 
saan Roland Kirk. Bill Evans, Marion 
Brown, and Dexter Gordon is very in. 

The campus pond is out. Large, heavy ob- 
jects are in, as is assassination conspiracy 
theories. Jimmy Carter and Jerry Brown 
ate out, and Ted Kennedy is in. The 
(>apacy was in a couple of weeks ago. but 
iTll probably be out by the time this is 
printed Backpacks, boxer shorts, shag 
rugs and wine and beer bottle collections 
are all very out 

Vietnam is in Mount Holyoke is in. Smith 
IS out 






A bee with very visible kneeze. 

Out words: bogus, gross, far out, cosmic, 
intense, dynamic, excellent, input and out- 
put, sensitivity, any french words or 
phrases, words ending in -ize, later, brew, 
keg party, wild and crazy guys, rip-off, 
tense, and pathetic. In words: politico, 
media, scuttlebutt, machinations, 
ridiculous, confrontation, continuum, 
dialectic, and Beeze Kneeze.The words 
"UMies " and "Smithies" are out. 

Grass roots organizing is out. and so is 
communism and socialism. The Revolu- 
tionary Student Brigade and the Revolu- 
tionary Communist Youth Brigade, the 
campus vestiges of the fragrr>ented left, are 
very out Used book and record stores are 
in. as are overstuffed chairs 

Steve Martin, the Firesign Theatre and 
Saturday Night Live are all out. although 
Dan Ackroyd and John Belushi are m 
Frances Ford Coppola, Bruce Dern and Jill 
Clayburg are in Woody Allen remains m. 
hut Diane Keaton is out. Ingmar Bergman 
IS out. but Ingrid Bergman is m 



Antiques 



The Collector Galleries 

11 Bridge St. Northampton 

584 6734 

Family Jewels 

56 Green St. Northampton 

584 0613 

Once in a Blue Moon 

5 Market St. Northampton 

584 6804 

Paul's Old Time Furnrture 

Emporium 

67 E Pleasant St. Amherst 

649 3603 



Apartments 

"Brittany Manor 

Amherst . 156 Brittany 

Manor Drive 

256^8534 

Brandywine 

50 Meadow St. Amherst 

549 0600 

Cliffside Apts 

Amherst Rd Sunderland Rt. 

_• 3958 



Colonial Village Apts. 

200 South East St Amherst 
2537163 

Crown Point Apts. 

370 Northampton Rd. 

Amherst 

253 7142 

Presidentail Apts. 

950 N Pleasant St 

Amherst 

549 6505 

Puffton Village Apts. 

1040 N. Pleasant St. 

Amherst 

Northwood Apts 

Hadley Rd Sunderland Rt. 

47 

665^3856 

Riverglade Apts. 

t Hadley Rd Amherst 

256 8294 

Holling Green Apts. 

Belchertown Rd. Amherst 

253 3000 

Squire Village Apts,^ 

Amherst Rd. Sunderland 

Rt. 116 

665 2203 



Towne House Apts. 

50 Meadow Amherst 
549 0839 

Village Park Apts 

E. Pleasant St. Amherst 

549 0099 



Art Supplies 

The Art Shop 

25 N. Pleasant St. Amherst 
2568159 

Design Supply Studio 

26 S. Prospect Amherst 
253 2529 
Earthwares 

103 N. Pleasant St 

Amherst 

256 8810 

Pierce's Art Store 

196 Main St, Northampton 

584 1207 



AUDIO 
Amherst Sudio 

259 Triangle St. Amherst 
549 2610 



Ethnicity is in, and so is your grand 
mother Expensive stereos, refngerators, 
hot plates and lounge furniture in you room 
are all in. Beanbag chairs have been out for 
a long time, gang. Wall murals are out, as 
are posters with sentimental sayings, 
nostalgia. Pop Art, Art Deco, Poster Art, 
Toulouse Latrec, Van Gogh, Mattisse, 
Jasfier Jons. Pollock and Degas pnrKs. 
Grafitti in the bathroom is out, and so is 
loud music, although it once was in. 

Rap sessions are out. and the term "rap 
session" was out an awfully long time ago 
Getting high with the people on your floor 
IS also out. In fact, staying in your room is 
in Friendliness, really, is out, as are fake 
(ompassion and compliments. 

Churlishness, irony and sarcasm are in. 
Dorm activities, like floor parties, are out. 
The less the people on your floor know 
<)l)out you, the more in you are. Throwing 
things out windows is out, and so are 
lounge TVs Room TVs are in Shouting at 
night IS in. and so is venting your spleen at 
strangers Try it 

Lxistentialism is out, and pnenomemology 
IS in Camus is out, and so is Herbert Mar- 
cuse Former Judge Robert Bonin is m. but 
his wife IS out The Oxford English Die 
tionary is m, and so is Webster's second 
edition The third edition is out. 
Telephones are out, but phone fraud is in. 
Pot and Coke and PCP are out, but whip 
pets are in. Drug-addled writers are in (Poe, 
Coleridge, Hunter Thompson) and 
homosexual writers are out (Capote, 
Wilde) 

We'll give new UMass President David C. 
Knapp the benefit of the doubt and say that 
he's in For now. The Golan Heights are in, 
but the Gaza Strip is out Hedonism and 
solipcism are in, and asceticism and 
transcendentalism are out Earthfoods is 
out and the People's Market is in. Tofu, 
nKtpeds and pinball are out Cheap wine. 
Coca Cola and Chevy Impalas are in. 

Test tube babies are in, and recombinant 
DNA IS out. Squash is in, and racketball is 
out MIRV missies are in. and Merv Griffin 
IS out All talk show hosts are out, with the 
possible exception of Tom Snyder. Schlitz, 
Miller, Lowenbrau, Busch. and Heinekin 
are out: Rolling Rock. Olympus, Beck's and 
Budweiser arem 

Fruity drinks like Pina Colada's are out. 
Just having coffee for breakfast is m, and 
eggs are out. Getting a job and making 
money is in, talking at)Out it is out. 
Quaaludes are m. McDonald's is m. but 
McManus' is out. The Rocky Horror Picture 
Show IS in. media candidates are in, stay- 
ing up very late is in, and so is Dean Field, 
until he dies (he's got tenure) . 

Artists Kline, Rothko and Moterwelt are 
in. Vladimir Nabokov and Henry Miller are 
in Norman Mailer is very out. 

Watergate analogies are out. The 50s are 
very out. and the 60s are out, too. The 705 
are m. and sn are the 80s 

The New York Times is in. in spite of 
Itself The Boston Globe and the New York 
Daily News are also in. I he tioston Herald 
American, no matter how hard they try, will 
never be in. The Vallev Advocate and Fresh 
Ink think they're in. and think that we think 
they're in, but they're out and everybody 
knows It but them. The Collegian is neither 
in or out: It's )ust there The Village Voice 
and the Phoenix are in, the Real Paper is 



BUSINESS DIR 



/' 



Dean William C. Field, who is in until} 
he dies. 

THESE ARE IN sport coats, medieval Jit. 
magazines (ike Boston and Esquire,] 
sweaters, talking to inanimate ob|6cts. stu- 
dying in the Hatch, bookishness andl 
scholarship, nuns, the student credit union, 
tea but not herbal tea. Whole Wheat Pizza,! 
Freud, piano playing, congo bars, the Finej 
Arts Center, old jokes, puns, middle initials, 
media manipulation so keep reading, Henryl 
Kissinger. Vermont, letter writing, moose,! 
Christmas trees. Shells No pest strips, The| 
Hulk, erotica, pessimism, Tom Waits, tack> 
is in if you know it's tacky, Motown, World| 
War I, and clutter _ 

THESE ARE OUT; women's names en- 
ding in "i", bamboo curtains, short! 
people, tennis, Pop Tarts ar\fi breakfast 
cereals, milk, agnosticism (you gotta 
declare, one way or the other), candles,' 
mail from the University, film courses. B.F. 
Skinner and R.S. Lang, guitar playing, be- 
• ing concerr>ed, preventive dental care, con- 
struction, jokes about Carter or his family. 
Senate hearings, Colorado, trying to set ] 
world records, Bic pens, doing-it yourself, 
tequila, sharks. World War II, disco of | 
course, sex symbols, Bucky Fuller, Exxon, 
flourescent lights, optimism, self- 
improvement groups, dubs, books, or 
clinics, shaving your legs or armpits, 
Hampshire College, going to prep school, 
most cult fifms. including the Graduate — in 
fact, graduating is out. 

Women's sti/dies is in. and so is feminism. 
Exclamation points are out' Some punctua 
tion is in; semi-colons and commas are. 
you know, in. Football is out. and so is 
hockey Lacrosse is in. Everybody wants 
soccer t9 be in, but it isn't. Sex is in and 
out, in and out, in case you were wonder 
ing. Multisyllabic German compound 
words are in Long pauses are in. 



and so is creative use of white space in 
newspapers. 

There you have it: some of the finer points ] 
of late 70s UMass chic. The key to the 70s, 
as you may have figured out from the I 
above lists, is me. Trying to get into other 
people's head tnps, understanding their 
hang ups and all that rot has been out for 
quite a while. 

The essential difference is simple: it used 
to be in to try and save the world; now it's 1 
in to try and save yourself. And because it's I 
in to be self oriented, it's in to be image- 
onented -or, it's in to be in again. 

So just close yourself up in your room, 
study a lot, talk to what ever large heavy 
objects are around, and read the Times. 
H»^y. Its the bee's knees 



Audio Service Center 

274 N Pleasant St. 

Amherst 

256-0524 

Mientka Radio-TV Inc. 

79 S. Pleasant St. Amherst 

253 3866 

Seiden Sound Inc. 

15 E Pleasant St. Amherst 

549 1105 

Sound Music 

92 King St. Northampton 

584 9547 

Sound Room 

186 Mam St Northampton 

584 4478 

RECORDS 
Sun Music 

9E. Pleasar>t St. Amherst 
549 2830 
Record Cellar 
36 Pleasant St. Northamp- 
ton 

586-5990 

Back Room Records 
N Pleasant St Amherst 
Faces of Earth 
next to Amherst Post Office 
253 3535 



Automotive 
AUTOMOBILES 
BIyda Ford 

171 King St. Northampton 

584 2400 

Cahillane Motors, Inc. 

375 South St. Northampton 

584 3792 

Paige's Chevrolet 

40 Dickinson St., Amherst 

253 3444 

Northampton V. W. 

246 King St. Northampton 

584-8620 

AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRS 
Belchertown Road 
Sunoco 

40 Belchertown Rd 
203 9394 
.Tom's Texaco 
' Belchertown Rd. Rt.9 
256 6093 

OBM Sunoco 

Rt.9 Hadley 
256 6860 
Rens Mobil 

161 N Pleasant St. 

Amherst 

2639059 



United Transmission 

236 Pleasant St. Nor- 
thampton 
5846790 

AUTOMOTIVE PARTS 
Allied Motor Parts 

319 Main St. Amherst 
256 8341 
Western Auto 
32 Mam St. NortWmpton 
584 3620 
BakTireCo. 

55 Damon Rd. Northamp- 
ton 
584-4769 



Banks 

Amherst Savings Bank 

I S. Pleasant St. Amherst 
256 8116 

First National Bank of 
Amherst 

II An\itv St Amherst 

256 8511 

more listings 
on page 32 



Sept. 5, 1978. Collegian, L-3 














RSO stands for 
Recognized Student 
Organizations. 
Here we present a 
partial list and features 
on some of the larger 
groups. 



Accounting Association- Purpose 
is to afford all students the op- 
portunity to identify with the accoun- 
ting profession. 

Afrikan Institute for the Martial 
Arts 

Afro American Society 
Ahora -- Purpose is to serve Spanish 
speaking people in Western Mass., 
and address their problems. 
Aikikai Club -- Purpose is to pro- 
mote the martial art of Aikido. 
Air Force ROTC 
Alternative Energy Coalition 
Amateur Radio Association - 
Purix>se is to promote interest in 
Amateur radio communication, relay 
messages, and promote public 
welfare. 

American Institute of Industrial 
Engineers -- Purpose is to stimulate 
the interest and advancement of 
students in industrial Engineering at 
UMass. 

American Society of Civil 
Engineers - Purpose is to stimulate 
the interest and advancement of 
students in civil Engineering at 
UMass. 

Amherst Dharma Study Club - 
Purpose is to study Tibetan Bud- 
dhism. 

Amherst Society of Chemical 
Engineers 

Amherst Study Coalition Against 
Racism 

Angel Flight -- Purpose is to pro- 
mote interest in the Air Force and ob- 
tain mforrr^ation concerning military 
services. 

Animal Science Club 
Aquatic Club -- Purpose is to serve 
as an off season training facility for 
the UMass Water Polo Club. UMass 
Masters Swim Club, and nationally 
and regionally qualified AAU swim- 
mers in the area. 

Arab Organization - Purpose is to 
promote and understand the Arab 
culture, and help foreign Arab 
students adjust to their new environ- 
ment. 

Arbor and Park Management 
Club 

Arboriculture Club - Purpose is to 
promote better understanding and 
communications for the Freshmen- 
Seniors and the professional field, 

Arnold Air Society -- Purpose is to 
advance air and space age citizen 
ship, to support air power and its role 
in national security, and to create a 
closer and more efficient relationship 
within the reserve officers training 
corps. 

Asian American Students 
Association --Purpose is to bring an 
awareness and understanding to an 
unrecognized and misunderstood 
minority. 
Astrology Club 



STUDENT AUTO WORKSHOP 



BY NANCY ENOS 

Whether you want to change the sludge in your '65 
VW or completely rebuild the engine in your 'vette, 
you'll want to check out the Student Auto Workshop 
this fall. 

The SAW. offers a number of work areas which are 
allocated on a first come, first serve basis. (At this time, 
an appointment calender may be started in order to 
conipjensate for busy periods and certain time consum- 
ing automotive repairs.) Along with the work space, the 
S AW. provides an excellent assortment of tools and 
equipment for almost any job. The only exception to 
this IS any major body work (e.g. painting, welding), 
and jobs requiring a hydraulic lift or front end 
alignments. Any questions concerning specific tools or 
erjiiipnient can be answered by a call or by stopping 
flown and looking over the facilities yourself There are 
also qualified mechanics on duty during ail hours of 
ojierations to assist and advise you in any problems you 
may have with your car Since S A.W. is a learn-by- 
doing operation, the rr>echanics will not do the work for 
you. They will help to find the answers in a collection of 
repair manuals which we keep on hand to guide begin- 
ners or unsure experts 

Majoi parts and supplies must be provided by the per 
son working on their car The mechanics will be able to 
provide information on the closest and most reasonable 
parts and supply stores in the area. We do carry a small 
inventory of oil, oil filters, nuts and bolts, and other 
common lubricants at reasonable prices 

There is no official membership fee or dues required to 



use the facilities. Instead, the SAW charges $2 50 per 
hour for the space, tools, and mechanical assistance. Of 
course, if the job only takes 5 minutes, the rate will be 
adjusted accordingly. On the other hand, if it's a major 
engine overhaul and the vehicle cannot be moved, there 
IS a $2 00 overnight fee and a daily maximum rate. 

Students sign in when beginning to work and tools are 
given out by the mechanic on duty. When the job is 
done, the tools are checked and the clock stops. During 
very busy periods of the year (especially around inspec 
tif>n time) it's best to call ahead to see if spaces are 
available 

The Student Auto Workshop started in 1971 and since 
that time has grown to self sufficiency. It employs all 
student mechanics under the management of a full time 
operations coordinator. The past few years we have 
l>een open year round including intersession and the 
summer. As of this printing, the fall hours have not 
l>een set due to the scherluling of the student 
mechanics They will include, however, certain week 
nitihts and probably Saturdays For information go to 
the Campus Center Information desk or call us at 
M5 0673 

The Workshop is located in the basement level of the 
•".in>t'ijs Center Garage and is accessible through the 
.•-•I vice vehicles 'permit parking entrance. 

So don't let that jalopy of yours fall dead in its tracks 
TninH down to the Student Auto Workshop ^nd get the 
Kivaliiable experience of doing it yourself. It's a great 
feeling And a cheaper one too' 




Astronomy Club - Purpose is to 
develop, maintain, and advance 
common interests in Astronomy and 
allied science. 

Bahai Club - Purpose is to aquaint 
interested people with the tenets of 
the Bahai faith. 

Belchertown Volunteers - Pui 
pose is to provide a Saturday af- 
ternoon recreation project that in- 
volves student volunteers with 
Belchertown State School residents. 
Bi-Lingual Collegiate program 
Bike Club -- Purpose is to promote 
bike use, touring, racing, and related 
activities, including public advpcacy 
of bicycling facilities. 

Black Mass Communications - 

Purpose is to provide over 20 hours 
per week of Black and Third World 
oriented radio programming on 
WMUA. 

Black Scientist oociety - Purpose 
is to unite all undergraduate and 



graduate Black students who have 
the common goal of achieving a 
degree within the scientific 
discipline. 

Boltwood Belchertown Project - 

Purpose IS to augment the efforts of 
the Belchertown State School staff 
in providing the care and habilitation 
of the handicapped individual. It is 
geared to enable as many residents 
as possible to adjust to life in the 
community and to provide 
satisfactory and useful life within the 
institution for those who are not yet 
able to leave the confines of 
Belchertown. 

Butterfield Arts Group -Purpose is 
to promote creative endeavours 
throuqh the arts. 

CAOS - Counseling and assistance 

for older students. 

Campus Center- Board of 
Governors -- Purpose is make policy 
for the Student Union Campus 



Center complex Elected members 
allocate student space and are 
responsible for all the programming 
held within the complex The office is 
m &7 Campus Center; phone 5 0194. 
Campus Crusada for Christ - 
Purpose is to discuss Christ as a 
person and his mission. 

Campus Girl Scout* 
Canterbury Club 

CCEBS -- Committee for the 
Collegiate Education of Black 
Students. 

Cheerleaders 

Chess Club 

Chile Solidarity Committee 

Chinese Club 

Chinese Student Club 



CONTINUED ON 
PAGE 4 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 




By SHARI BICKEL 

The Student Government Association (SGA) at 
UMass Amherst consists of 130 student senators, a 
Speaker, President, Trustee, and Treasurer who 
through various committees and weekly Wednesday 
night Senate meetings, initiate programs and share 
ideas that will improve student life at UMass. 

Many programs and services offered to students are 
financially supported by the SGA. Every full-time 
undergraduate student at UMass pays an annual $72 
Student Activities Tax Fee (SATF), which amounts to 
$1.3 million for the academic year 1978-79; $1.50 per stu 
dent goes to the Distinguished Visitor's Program, the 
remainder is allocated by the SGA to 50 student groups. 

The SGA funds and suoervises the Recognized Stu- 
dent Organisations (RS J) Student Activities Office. 
Located on the fourth floor of the Student Union 
Building, the office serves as a resource center for more 
than 400 RSO groups on campus. Every student activity 
or program is planned or coordinated through the of- 
fice. 

Some services the SGA funds are; the transit service, 
UMass Daily Collegian, WMUA, Course and Teacher 
Fvaliiation Guide (GATE), among o.thet programs. 

The SGA created three professionally staffed offices 
which work for students, they are the Legal Services 
Office ILSO), the Student Center for Educational 
Research and Advocacy (SCERA), and the Economic 
nt^wplnnment Officft (EDO). 



LSO, located in 922 CC provides free legal counsel to 
all fee paying students, as well as representation in 
criminal ancftivil proceedings at courts within 30 miles 
of the Amherst campus. 

SCERA. 422 SU, is the result of a merging between 
SCER and SOP (Student Organizing Project), a group 
that will work towards educational improvement and 
organization for campus and national issues. 

EDO oversees the coops and student businesses such 
as the Credit Union. People's Market, Student Auto 
Workshop, Photo Coop and more. Other offices in the 
SGA are the Attorney General's Office and the Office of 
Communications. 

The Student Attorney General's office is composed of 
two departments, the Student Attorney General and 
the University Judiciary. The Attorney General trains 
students who volunteer as advocates to defend or pro- 
secute students brought up on charges before the 
University Judiciary. 

The University Judiciary handles any case brought 
against a UMass undergraduate who has allegedly 
violated the rules and regulations of the SGA constitu- 
tion, l)y laws, and amendments. 

The Office of Communications is the public relations 
center for the SGA. The Communication's Director 
writes pamphlets and brochures about the SGA and its 
services Most recently, this office wrote Student to 
Student. Located in 407 409 SU, the office has graphics 
equipment and typerwriters for students use at no cost. 

For more information on the SGA, visit 420 SU or call 
545 0341 Senate elections take place this month, pick 
up an application if you are interested. 



L-4, Collegian, Sept 5. 1978 



THIRD 



BY MARIO BARROS 

Survival IS that cruel game that people of colour alt over 
the world have been forced to play (with someone else 
trying to set the rules). The game goes on here at 
UMass but there are avenues of self help open that can 
prove to he invaluable 

For the minority' student at this institution, the first 
contact with available programs and services is the 
CCEBS Program The Collegiate Committee for the 
EduiMtion of Black Students is designed to offer the 
student help and assistance in the academic aspects of 
the gan^e CCEBS offers academic counseling, tutorial 
assistance and study aids such as quiet space and a 
lilnaiy All of the at)ove are located in the New Africa 
House, the heart of the UMass Black community 

Also located in the New Africa House are Yvonnes 
West Indian Paradise and Our Shop "Yvonne's" is 
the place for West Indian and Soul Food Her 
specialities are her chicken and fish dishes (served with 
nee that s )ust this side of the Promised Land), but she 
also has some occasional specials and. her desserts 
(including cheesecakes, and rice and banana puddings) 
come from the same vicinity as her rice The at 
n>osphere is always friendly and is a good place to meet 
and talk to your other brothers and sisters while enjoy 
ing a meal that's prepared with both your taste buds 
and your health in mind 

Our Shop is the barber shop in the New Africa House 
located nght next to "Yvonne's" in the basement The 
artists in residence are Bo and Barry Hours are yet to be 
set but should be posted on the door once they have 
then schedules set. For a good haircut at a better price. 
Our Shop IS the spot 

On the first floor of tfw New Africa House (I told you it 
was the heart") is the 3rd World Cultural Center Head 
ed by Van Jackson, the Cultural Center is responsible 
for many of the 3fd World entertainment affairs such as 
concerts, ball, etc They also serve as coordinators for 
conferences such as the National Black Students Con 
ference and as a link to other college and nationwide 
groups 

Working out of NAH's various studios are The Pan 
African Institute of Martial Arts and people involved in 
modern dance as an expressive medium of international 
struggle for peole of colour Both groups offer classes in 
their respective arts and performances for the public 
For the musically inclined, ^atch for the word of a 
Lumumt)a Hut (Yvonne s after Dark) performance that 
could feature the talents of Charles "Maieed" Greenlee. 
Chris Henderson. Alden Griggs or any other truly 
"It lam in the area when not recording 
or touring 

NAH lin the Central Residential Area) has plenty to of 
fer. but more can lye found in the Campus Center Stu 
dent Union complex More counseling (academic and 
p»-fsonal) can tn* found at Room To Move, located in 
tti^" Student Union Buildinn Doing mo«»'" personal 
conseiing dim crisis intervention type things Room To 



CENTERS 



AND 



GROUPS 




D. RODMAN PHOTO 



WORLD 

who needs a more personal touch or a little more 
understanding. Also in the Student Union BIdg. is the 
Otfire of the 3rd World A",iirb. in this case, "Affairs' 
covers everything from political to cultural. They too 
sponsor conferences and conerts etc. along with taking 
a voice in both campus and international issues. 

If communication is your interest, you need not leave 
the USB s confines to find the Black Mass Communica 
tions Project Dealing largely with the media s radio 
form (but not neglecting it's many other manifesta 
tions), BMCP produces programming pertinent and 
entrMiainiiig to the Black, Hispanic and Asian com 
munities. Valuable experience in production, program 
ming can be hand in hand with doing sometfimg impor 
tant for your l)rotherb and sisters. A must for those bent 
toward communications BMCP's broadcasts are air 
on WMUA. 91 IFM 

The spoken word is powerful, but the power of th 
wntten word can last forever That is the spirit of Num 
mo News whose offices are located in NAH on the firs, 
floor. Wit)> News and commentary this weekly's main] 
thrust, a review of the world's events and progress on 
the various fronts of struggle is presented from the_ 
point of view of those who struggle, not those who op 
press Nummo News shares distribution with The Col 
legian in much the same spirit as Nummo but with a 
straighter news format is the Black Affairs section 
published Bi weekly in The Collegian Black Affairs' of 
fice is in the Collegian offices on the first floor (below 
the concourse level) of the Campus Center Complex. 

The campus' various residential areas have their 3rd 
World cultural centers but the most well known and ac 
tive one is The Malcolm Center in Berkshire Dining 
Commons in Southwest Hosting everything from par- 
ties to exhit)itions to workshops, there alvvays seems 
to t>e something getting of at the 'X ". When there are 
no scheduled events the "X" is a recreation and study 
room that can be conducive to booking up or winding 
down. 

The aforementioned are there to serve the needs of our 
'iimunity This is very important to remember. Als<. 
v> y important to remember is that to continue to offe 
these services, they need the support of the people tha 
they aim to aid Taking advantage of and getting involv 
ed with any of these organizations activities can b 
t)oth a helpful and rewarding intercourse for both yo 
and the various groups. 

Well, that's what's there for you, if I've left anyone ou 
Tm sorry and if any new organizations crop up, th 
.♦hove people could turn you towards them What 
hopefully have done though is to give a picture of all th 
sides to survival in the UMass experience and when 
iH^^an this enterprise, I thought completeness could b 
sacrificed if even by accident So let me end by wishin 
the various organizations a most fruitful year, extendin 
a hearty "Welcome Back " to those who return and a 
eriually hearty "Welcome " to those just gettin 
''♦''*' may It t>e a year of progress for us all 



Christian Science Organisation •- 

Purpose is to unite the Christian 
Science and the university communi- 
ty for mutual help in the understan- 
ding of Christian Science. 
Cinema Club 

Classics Society ■ Purpose is to 
further the knowledge of classical 
societies within the university com 
munity. 

Coalition for Alternative 
Agriculture • Purpose is to initiate a 
complete food co-op system at 
UMass by using some university farm 
land and other resources. 

Coalition for Environmental 
Quality-'Purpose is to educahe the 
University community on en- 
vironmental problems, to institute 
programs, to identify issues, 
solutions, and ways to coordinate 
with other groups. 

Collegiate Flying Club-Purpose is 
to arrange economical flight in- 
struction for its members, provide 
expanded opportunities for flying, 
and advance aviation knowledge 
Committee for the Liberation of 
South Africa- Purpose is to educate 
people about the situation in South 
Africa. They also try to end racism on 
campus and throughout the 
comunity 

Committee to Stop Amherst 
Towing 

Committee on Poverty -Purpose is 
to research information on poverty in 
the United States and abroad. They 
also develop programs that broaden 
student participation in such issues 
as prison reform, famine, welfare, 
and health 

Communication Disorders Club 
Community Development 
Center-See UMassDirections 
booklet. 

communization Action Project 
Commuter Collective 
Council for The Exceptional Child 
Credit Union- The UMass Federal 
Credit Union is located on the 
lobby floor of the Student Union 
Building. For more information 
stop by or look for the SGA's 
Student to Student article on the 
Credit Union 

Cultural Educational Devlopment 
Committee 
Dames Club ? « 

Dance Club 

Distinguished Visitors Program-- 
Purpose IS to bring to UMass out- 
standing persons in the various fields 



DECORATE/ 

We have the colors to make your dorm, 
apartment or house, really you... 

Choose your favorite: 

•Windowshades .Ryaniie Paints •Rollers Cr Brushes 

•Wallpaper .^^^^^ ^^^ pgj^,, •Glass 

•Curtain Rods ^^ 'Mirrors 




CONT. ON PAGE 5 



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CO 






By Cindy Leerer 

The fall of 1978 marks the sixth anniversary of 
Everywoman's Center. Created in 1972 out of a personal 
awareness of and concern with the needs of women 
seeking to identify new directions for themselves, 
Everywoman's Center continues to seek ways to enable 
wonien to better survive and gain control over thar own 
lives. 

Since 1972, EWC's programs have grown from a 
workshop series for won>en (Project Self) and coun- 
seling by one part-time counselor to a multi faceted 
resource center. Located in Goodell Hall, we maintain a 
drop in resource and referral center from 9 AM to 9 PM 
Monday through Friday where women can come for 
coffee, information, and conversation. Available 
resources include job, housing, and child care books; 
annotated listings of medical, legal, and educational 
resources; resource files with articles and information 
on issues of concern to women; and bulletin boards 
which include information on women's arts, political 
action, lesbian news. Third World Women's news, and 
events Front desk staffers are available to answer 
questions, and we are looking for more women in 
ft?rested in helping with staffing. 

In addition to our drop in center, we offer various 
urograms and services tor women A major priority is to 
.iddress the needs ot those groups of women that are 
generally underserved by trjditional University services: 
poor women, Third World woir^en. welfare recipients, 
working women, women in changing families, battered 
md sexually abused women, and lesbian women Our 
programs and services are auned at providir>g women 
with concrete ways to begin to address immediate 
problems, support groups to share similar concerns, 
skills fur firtding meaningful work, and ready access to 
all forms of learning. 

Helpir»g won>en to become confident and whole in 
liteir own right, EWC's counselors provide free short- 
term ant lacist. anti sexist counseling The Counseling 
program provides services in a number of environments 
with thie recognition that needs are often quite different 
across racial, cultural and socioeconomic lines. Taking 
the differences of a large and 'diverse women's com 
munity into account, the program inchjdes lesbian 
counseling, counseling around older women's issues, 
multicultural counseling and family counseling. In 
addition, referral to trusted therapists in the area for 
long term personal counseling is available. 

Rape, the fastest rising violent crime in the United 
States, and other forms of sexual violence such as 
sexual assualt, battering, sexual intimidation, and 
harassment are issues of concern to all women. 
Reflecting that concern, EWC has this year maintained 
a separate position to work towards the elimination of 
sexual violence and to provide and secure more ef- 
fective services for victims. Twenty four hour coun 
seling iand advocacy for University and community 
worT>en includes crisis intervention, medical and legal 
advocacy and short term counseling. In addition, EWC 
provides a facilitated group for -rape victims We also 
offer training around issues of sexual violence and 
community education programs which deal with rape 
prevention, avaiUible services for victims, and myths 
and realities about why rape occurs 
Working toward enabling women to find meaningful 
work and to change their attitudes about their worth 
and abilities, EWC offers career counseling and life 
planning services to University and community women. 
Services include short-term individual and group 
counseling in which interests and values are explored, 
needs and skills assessed, and goals formed and im- 
plemented. Assistance in resume writing, effective job 
hunting techniques, and interview skills is available. ■ 
Working to counteracthhe neglected issues of child 
care and education for poor, single and welfare 
mothers, the Poor Women's Task Force, established in 
1972. rebels against the traditional image assigned to 
poor wonr>en by society. PWTF works to increase 
access for poor women to higher education, to ease 
their return to school by pressing for greater respon- 
siveness by the University and the welfare system, and 
to make other students and faculty more sensitive to the 
unique life circumstarices of welfare and poor women. 
Help, information on child care and housing, advocacy 
regarding admissions arid financial aid, academic and 
career counseling, and welfare and support groups are 
available 

This fall, the Edurational Alternatives program will 
once again be offering a Project Self workshop series. 
The workshops will attempt to reach specific groups of 
women whose needs are generally overlooked or un- 
derserved by traditional University services. The Project 
Self workshop series aims toward providing information 
and skills that can help women begin to change our 
lives. Examples of workshops to be offered this fall 



include: Issues for Older Women, Staff Women's 
Rights on the Job, Assertiveness Training, Yoga 
•Issues in Women's Health, Self Defense, Basic 
Economic Survival Skills, and issues of concern to the 
Third World women's community. The workshops will 
begin in early October. 

Working closely with the Educational Alternatives 
program, the Third World Women's Program develops 
workshops appropriate to the needs of Third World 
women. The program coordinates with other Third 
World organizations to develop resource information, 
services and programs designed to meet the cultural 
linguistic and political needs of Third World women. 

For working women trying to change societal 
prejudices against women in work, EWC has available a 
resource person with knowledge on affirmative action 
and discrimination cases In addition, we offer 
workshops on staff women's rights through the Project 
Self workshop series. 

Finally, the staff of EWC maintains an active liason 
with the administration and various departments of the 
University and works to advocate for change for 
women. 

Information on all these programs and services is 
available at EWC. We are located in Goodell Hall, Room 
506, near the mam library and are open Monday through 
Friday from 9 AM to 4 PM for services and 9 AM to 9 
PM for drop in. Please come by and see us. 




Everywomen's Center, 
located in Goodell Hall 



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^Highlighting 

it Permanent 
Waves 

^Hejinas 



Ragincy Hilr Stylists 



189 No. Pleasant St. 

Amherst 

253-9526 



241 Main St. 

Northampton 

586-6252 







Sept. 5, 1978. CoUeaiah. L-S 

of human endeavor. TK3 program 
aims to expand options and 
knowledge for UMass student, 
always mindufi of the search for 
truth. 

Design Students Group -Purpose 

IS toi provide a variety of 
exgracurricular activities for those 
students in the field of design. 
Divine Light Club 
Drum -Purpose is to disseminate 
information of a Third World, 
ISterary-cultural nature to the 
community at large. They provide a 
constructive sounding board for 
black and Third World students so 
they may express their creative 
abilities and educate the white 
community. Located in New Africa 
House. 

Earth Foods-This group intends to 
educate the student in preparation of 
natural and organic foods, provide 
alternative working and learning 
forums with veoetarian interests, and 
to afford the students with natural 
foods at a minimum cost. Located on 
the lobby floor of the Student Union 
Building. 



Easy Rider Service--A place to call 
to get rides to your destination. Call 
545 0859 

Eckenkar International Study 
Society 
Eco Latino 

Economic Journal for Students 
Student Center for Educational 
Research and Advocacy- Purpose 
IS to serve as a research and ad- 
vocacy arm of the SGA. Located on 
tf>e fourth floor of the Student Union 
Building, acress from the Council 
Chambers. 

Environmental Sciences Council 
Equestrian ClubFashion Council- 
Purpose IS to give the students of 
UMass the opportunity to identify 
with the profession of fashion 
merchandising 

Fencing Club- Purpose is to provide 
fencers with the opportunity to 
study, promote, and participate in 
the sport of Fencing. 
Floriculture Club-Purpose is in- 
crease interest in floriculkture, 
provide flower exhibits, and 
stimulate competition and 
fellowship. 

Food Scierice and Untrition Club 
Food Usage and Action Group 

Fruit and Vegetable Club-Purpose 
is to expand student knowledge in 
fields related to their study 
Field Hockey Club-Purpose is to 
promote participation in field hockey 
through organized play. 
Future Plans and Goal Support 
Grassroots Co-op School-- 
Provides daycare and other 
cooperative programs. 
Gss Book Exchange 
Gymnastics 

Many Glliding Club--Purpose is to 
bring together those students in- 
terested in the sport of hang gliding. 
Handicapped Student Collective-, 
-Purpose IS to promote well being of* 
handicapp>ed students as well as any 
non-handicapped students, and lead 
them into the mainstream of the 
university community. 
Hard Times Conference 
Hellenic American Association-- 
Purpose IS to expose the universitq 
community to greek culture, and 
organize educational activities which 
will make known classical and neo- 
classical greek society. • 
Heymakers Square Dance Club-- 
Purpose is to enjoy and promote 
square dancinq. 

CONT ON PAGE 10 



PEOPLE'S 

MARKET 

OPEN 



Sept. 18th— 1st day of never 

Hrs.8-5 



Mon-Tues 
Sept. 5th-1 5th 
Hrs. 11-2 

"Give Your Stomach a Break" 
fresh, natural, whole food 

Located m Student Union BIdg., down the hall from the Post Office 



k%?. 



L-6, Coilegian, Sept 5, 1978 




WMUA 



Sept. 5. 1978. Qpilegian, L-7 



BvMARKLECCESE 

Down in the basement of Marston Hall 
there IS music playing, people busily scurry 
ing between rooms other people chatting, 
telephones ringing, large microphones all 
over and vast consoles with an awful lot of 
knobs and dials 

What all those people and all those pieces 
of equipment are doing i$ producing 7- 
ddys a week 24 hours a day radio totally 
run anri staffed by students 

The stauon is WMUA FM. 91 I and they li 
be celeb'ati. g their 30th year on the air this 
fall The.r signal 1 000 watts m steroc 
originating from a transmitter on top of 
Emily Dickenson House in Orchard Hill, car 
reach from Vermont to Connecticut' ana 
out into the Berkshires 

Their programming is a mix of netM, 
public affairs, and just about any kind of 
nvusic that has f)een pressed onto vinyl 
News Director Charlie Holmes sees MUA's 
variety and absense of a musical format as 
one of the station's most appealing 
characteristics 



We don't have a standard format 
Everyone who is on the air decides, in tfieu 
own best judgement what to do on the 
air WMUA IS like New England s 

weather, wan a minute and we'll change, 
said Holmes 

This fall the siafion will begm its 
with the very popular Jubilation Ja//. on 
Sunday nights from 7pm to 2 a m Men 
day nights the featured program is 

Concepto Latino from 7 to K) p m 
featuring Latin n^usic Also on Monday 
nights from 6 to 7 p m , will be Neptune s 
Echo an astrology program that asks 
listeners U) call m 

WMUA IS staffed by more than IQO 
students mostly volunteers who work as 
disc (OCkeys news reporters sports 
reporters, engineers technicians and at 
various other jobs 

Tuestlay nights will be The Sports Cafe." 
another call in show, this time with sports 
as the siil>|eci Wedn«'vlay niornmg has a 
four hour program, from 6 to K) a m , that 
highlights Black classic>i< music 

On 1 hursday nights Ken Mosakowski, • 
local political expert, does the one hour 
show Focus." which he has been doing 
for the past 9 years Aftpr Mosakowski, the 
Women s Media Protect is on from 7l0 
m 

News programs air at 7, 7 30 8. 8 30 and 
9 in the morning, at noon, and at 5 30 is the 
•lalf hour news, sports and feature pro 
gram. Newswatch MUA has a local 
newsg.it I >i ling team of about 20 reporters, 
.md IS a subscrit)er to the services of the 
Associated Press 

WMUA also has the capabilities to broad 
cast from remote locations, and each year 
hro^tc asts the Amherst town meeting live 
They also broadcast the UMass basketball 
and football games 




>•#« 



■^Oi^ooo##o#o# 




NOMPSON'S 






STADIUM 



One of our biggest problems is funding, 
S.IK1 Holmes The liscense to operate \ts% 
Mon commercial station is owr>ed by the 
UMass Board of Trr«tees. although 
students itandle tf>e d3y lo day operation 

The people aro«>.id »>ere work very hard 
Af\<\ they don't ^i paid very much," utd 
Holmes 

Our Qujkty IS directly related to our effort 
and cMir effort is directty related to otw 
prifle. he said 

"We don't like to think of ourselves as a 
roiieqe station. We like to think of 
oursehres as a professional station located 
on a coNege campus ' 

We love to have anyor>e who is in- 
terested come down and work for us 
There is always something to do. although 
not everything is as f xciting as people 
thought radio would be Look in the Col 
legian for our ads for recruitment rneetings 
and listen tr^ MUA, ' Holmes 
said WMUA IS located in 42 Marston 
Hall, on the east side of the campus, 
behind the Graduate R«'search Center! 
Their phor>e numbers is 5 2876 or 5 2877. 




.i:^^5 



^r^W^ 



Per 'pton, Jessica, Gunne Sax 
b r, *-*orse in Thompson's 
Womeii . D .jartnent * 

In our Men's Department, 
leading the fall fashions are 
Pendleton, Arrow shirts, Levi as 
well as fall suits & jackets from 
Crickateer 



Open til 
tPri 



Since 1887 
AMHERST CENTER 



BAG. MC 
or CASH 




D^NSKlN. 



ALL THE NEW 
FALL ITEMS 




Pat tag sale ! 

t m^a^mmmm * ^ 



LIQUORS 

University Drive 

Amherst Shopping Center 



Free delivery ($7.00 min.) 

Deliv. hours: 6-10 Mon-Thurs. 5-10:30 Fri ft Sat 



Telephone 253-9431 or 253-9432 
Open 9:00 a.m. -11:00 p.m. 



Kegs*Beer*Wines*Cheeses*Soda«lc 
Full assortment of liquor & wines 



Miller 12oz NR 

8.99 case 




r 



m 

84-M GrMti StrMt 
Nonhompton 



HS4' 




with OU-Vmt 
Bargains al - 



.<f 



Easy Chairs from $10.00 

Couches from $20.00 

Neptune Super Single Pine 

Frame with Pedestal, Mattressi 

Heater and Liner $199.00 



Rolling Rock 12oz NR 
5.50 +.73dep. 



rv 



Brand New! 

Firm Full Size Mattress and 
Spring Sets from $120.00 



PAUL'S 



*quanitites are limited! 
^|^^.y|l||r ^ul's - we're always here from 10am-5:30pm 

at 



FURNITURE 



at 



57 E. Pleasant St., Amherst 549-3603 



Falstaff 12oz cans 



5.50 



Donnelli Lambrusco 50oz 

2.88 



Blue Nun 23oz 

3.39 



St. Pauli Girl 12oz NR 

11.85 case 



Canadian LTD 1 .75L 59.2oz 

9.90 



Popov Vodka 1.75L 59.2oz 

8.79 



L 8, Collegian. Sept. 5. 1978 





ui 



O 

o 
o 

I- 



o 

03 



I he Boltwood Belchertown Protect, a Five College 
oman.^ation based at the Belchertown ^tate School 
^f.nJi'K®"'^'^^ opportunity to gain field ex-^^ 
perience through volunteer placenient Since its in 
ceptK>n in 1969, the Project has recruited over 2 000 
volunteers. '^^ 

This fall, students will volunteer three hours weekly in 
any one of the 14 programs designed to meet the 
individual needs of State School residents. Some of 
the programs include coffee houses, recreational ac- 
ities, and comnnunity awareness. 

The Boltwood Programs don't require students with 
specific skills or academic backgrounds They simply 
require peopte with a willingness to learn, to experience 
to try new things. ""^.o. 

And that is really wnat volunteenng is about. "It gives 
students an additional dimension to their personalities " 
says Sarah Hamilton, Directof o* New Students 
Programs. "Students learn more about them 
setves because it's not their routine classroom' 
Situation .' ' 

Paul Hamel. Acting Coordinator of Student Activities, 
agrees "Education doesn't begin and end in a- 
classroom, " he says "Clearly volunteering is a way for 
students to qet involved, get new experiences and meet 
new people." 

The Boltwood Project otters students a chance to take 
part in recreational and social activities and develop 
relationships with residents, usually on a one to one 
basis It also gives them a chance to meet other 
students from the five colleges with similar interests 

AH programs at the School are designed by students 
who are employed as Boltwood Supervisors These 
seven Supervisors participate m a full time summer 
training session as well as help design recruitment 
which will begin on September 5. 1978' 

The supervisors have all been associated with Bolt 
wood .n tUe past and have gained an appreciation of the 
Pfo)«'ct s valijp to all students 

" ^ commerited. It s a good opportunity 

'i'l t(i ir.e tbeoretical classroom situation and gam 

fe.ii life experience Its also a chance to get 

togeth*>r with a bunch of other students and havra 
good time ' 

Voiu.ueers are the Projects most vital resource 
says Boifwood Coordinator Cmdv Rogers They are 
the hfelirie of the Project And we try to do everything 
we can to rnahe their f,eld placement an enjoyable and 
worthwhile learninq experience " 




MMiight! 



Varied menu. Totally new atmosphere 




SteaK Out 

Corner of Route 9 and 

University Drive 

Amherst Massachusetts 

256-8557 




Bike b€ig8» Outerwear •Outdoor gear 

We cany a terrific line of 
Daypacks/Bookba^s 

Plus bike packs/tents/vests/parkas/more 

AD at Discount Prices!!! 



Cannondale Company Store 
197 Main Street. Northampton 



UMass 
Explained 

Have you ever been lost on the UMie-Go-Round? 

Have you ever looked for an answer without even knowing the 

question? 

Have you ever been run around until your red tape was ragged? 

HELP IS AT HAND! 



The Information Data Bank is a service designed to get you to the right place the first time 
IDB maintains.a current file of information on function, location, hours of operation and the peo- 
ple to see m nearly all the offices and agencies of the University. Next time you have a question 
about where to go or who to talk with, call the Information Data Bank first -it may be the last call 
you have to make. 

545 1555 Monday-Thursday, 8:30 a.m. -8:00 p.m 
Friday, 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 



I I 



/- 



Information 

Data Bank 



A service of the Dean of Students Office, 227 Whit 



more 



COLLICE DRUG STORE 



AVAIU^BLE AT 



X 




foods plus 

Vitamin Saie 

B-Hundred 

795 



^TberinPlus 

^^ corrpareto 

Therj 



B-CompiaK 
100^ 



250t 



VgtaminE 



400 lU 
100*. 



Dolomite 
lWWi097 



500^ 



^onsuKYbur Pharmacist 
About The Need For 

VnAMINS 



STOCK UP NOW SALE ENDS 9-30-78 



A<l4Mted ^W Scu^ Sfi€CccU4/f 



Sm^ Will Hol^ 
TtdlibrMK HoMtr 




ToollibrMli 



Colfatt Trial Sizt 



4 MAIN Sr 



1S3-2523 



P 



AMHERST 



Sept 5, 1978, Collegian, L 9 





We want to welcome all new and return- 
ing students. Please stop by and sample 
our new menu items. We still offer Siui- 
day brunch as well as a new and expand- 
ed Happy Hour Mon.-Sat. 3-6 p.m. 



Appetizers 



Charryitona ClanM - on tht half^Mll 



I StMnMd SHrimp • Mrvcd in the 
with our own tangy cocktail smic* 

Ctamt Caiino - bakad to ordtr 



SmtN 





ne 



Munchies 



a: 



t> 



• CWthMiUMMmMlaN.E. Style d|»«Mlar 

Cu^ . Bowl 1 

• '>MB«m''CtiiK 

Cmp ; . . Bowl , 

tAHotHmabommrvedwithfrrnhbiwedi 



if 



.>f 



A v d >l gt| f of frssh raw vagatablas 

ChaaM BailM du Jour 
(with cracHml 

Our Homamad» Barmuda Onion 
(mth chips) 



H 



All Amarican Ambroita 

Fra#i fruit oombinad witti oeconut and orange liqueur 

Spinach Salad 

Mounds of spinach leavae blended with mushrooms, 
Bermuda onion, wedges of tomstos, w e dge of lemon 
and topped with freshly grated egg yolk. 

ChaTs Salad « .. 

Fresh greem combined with imported ham, importad 
Swiss cheese, moist turtiey, wedge of tomato, Barmuda 
oniorts, cucumtier and a sprinkling of croutons and 
frash bacon bits, and sliced hard t>oiled eggL 



Chanpagne Dining 

with Beer Prices 

Craata your own Omaittta with 
#irae farm frash 

• Avocado 
(inmmon) 

• Bacon* 

• Chili 

• Ham 

• Mu#)rooms 



• SpfXHJtS 

• Strawberries 

• Sour Cream 

• Spinach 



American 
Cheddar 

Muartctaf 

^- -i — 
jwm 



Delano's Victory Garden 



Crab Salad 

A large tomato stuffed with crab salad, accompanied 

«vith sliced hard boiled egg and garnish. 

Mudirootn Salad 

Organically -grown mushrooms with hearts of Romairta 

lettuce, scallions. carrot stripe end fresh lemon wedge. 

To«ad Salad 

Consists of crisp greens. Bermude oniorv, and dices of 
fresh cucurr^MT together with tomato wedgss. ^ 
Medium Large 

Salad Oraaainp Oil and Vineger. House 
French. Blue Cheese, Russian. Creamy Italian, 



The New Deal 

Cantar Cut Top Sirloin 

A center cut of eged t)eef , tKoiled to your taste. 




Turfcay or Ham (Cold mmm) 
Either of the above servad with swiss cheese 
tomato. cucumtMT, mushrooms, cottage 
and scallions. 

Vegetarian Chef's Seled 

A delightful combination of fresh avocados (in mmonf. 
Alfalfa sprouts, carrots. Sunflower seeds, Tofu, and 
walrHJts with a medley of grains, crowr>ed with Swiss 



Salad 

ftomaine lettuce with fresh gftHki Italian cheese, 
croutons, bacon, covered with aur own speciel drewng. 



On Our Bread Line 

|H^ ThaLi#it The Hearty 

• Our Rare Roast Bacf 



• Imported Ham Sendwic fc 

• Extra Lean Corned Beef 



• Tomatos and Oniom 



All omelettes include Rye toest. 

(Our omelttef an coo/ted ihtfity. Eureitmn styhJ 

Oversized Hamburgers ^ 

Aocompenied by cole slew, chips and pkkla. 
Build your own: 

• Avocado • Onions • Cheese 
(in $9mon) • Peenut Butter Amarican 

• Bacon* • Sprouts Blue 

• Chili • Tomato Cheddar 

• Lettuce Muenster 

• Mushrooms *Bacon 15< Extra Sw«« 



This cut is thinly sliced London Broil, martneted in 
distirKtive hertis and spices from an old family recipe. 

Scallopa 

Succulent scellops seuteed in a delicate wirte with herbs 

and spices. 

(All of the above dinnert include fra$h bread, our garden 
talad. potato or rice.) 



Beverages 



Coffee 

Senka 



Tea 



Juioa 
Soft Drinks 



A tender rib eye steek, grilled to your taste with cheese 
of your choice, seuteed onions end homefries. Served 
on home ma de FrerKh breed. 

Btaak on a Stidi 

Chunks of marinated sirloin accompanied by wedges of 
tomato, onion and green pepper. Prepered in our broiler 
and served on e bed of our speciel rice. 



Crepe of Iha Day 

Includes our gerden 



SendwKSR 

The Light • Includes Chips, Pickle and Cole Slew 
The Hearty • Includes our Gerden Salad, Chips and Pk:kle 

(The ebave eerved on Light Rye, Dark Rye, Roll. 
Homemade French Bread - 20t Extra.! 

• Grilled Maple Leaf Dog 
(with chips end pick lei 

Extra Cheese 

Chili 
Bacon 

Happy Days are Here Again 



New York 
C h eese ca ke 

Fresh Edeirs 
Deily Speciel 



Cakes 

Hon 
Pies 




57 N. Pleasant St. 

Across from the fire station 

253-5141 

Please Inquire about our Daily Chalkboard Special 

WE ACCEPT VISA. MASTER CHARGE and AMERICAN EXPRESS ($5 00 Minimum) No Checks Please 




LW. Co/legian, Sept. 5, 7978 






^SS\ A Fine quality aifto body 

S**' \/ gla$$ work & framework 




State licensed insurance appraisers #002900 



AUTO 



h 



'U'l '",.i",.; .,,".:!7^/:'''-^^;, 



Used cars & tracks 



116 Federal St. (Rte. 9), Belchertown, Mass. 



Hillel -Purpose is to serve the 
Jewish community be providing a 
Hillel House, a Rabbi, and 
stimulating activities for Jewish 
students. 

Horror Film Society 
Hotel Sales Management 
Association-Purpose is to provide 
a better knowledge of hotels sales 
and its problems. 

lndex--Purpose is to issue a 
representative yearbook for the 
University of Massachusetts. Office 
IS located near the Collegian offices 
on the bottom Floor of theb Campus 
Center. 

Indian Association 
Infant Care Experimental Center 
Innkeepers Club -Purpose is to 
provide opportunities for its mem- 
bers to expand their knowledge of 
the food service and lodging in- 
dustry. 

Institute of Electircal and Elac- 
tronic Engineering 
International Club Purpose is to 
provide opportunities for its mem- 
bers to expand their knowledge of 
the food service and lodging industy. 
Institute of Electrical and Elec- 
tronic Engineering 
International Club -Purpose is to 
provide communication and planning 
foir the various nationality oriented 
student associations. 
International Folk Dance Group - 
Purpose IS to provide an opportunity 
for people in the five college com- 
munity to participate in international 
folk dance at UMass. 
International Socialist Com- 
munKy 

International Christian 
Fellowship -Purpose is to witness 
Jesus as God Incarnate, and seek to 
lead others to a personal faith in him. 
Irish CuKural xvkpyty 
issues in Agriculture- Purpose 
ismho educate those interested in 
issues of agriculture, natural 
resources, nutrition, the food 
shortage, and other relevant sub- 
jects. 

Italian Club-Puwxssiis to provide 
students of the Italian Language and 
literature with the opportunityu to 
acquaint themselves with the culture 
to a greater extent 



CONT ON PAGE- 14 














Sept 5, 1978, Collegian. L-11 



COLLEGIAN 



PAT DOBBS PHOTO 



BY BILL SUNDSTROM 

Insuring that you have a newspaper to 
read every day of the school week requires 
a daily ritual involving the more than 200 
students who form the staff of the 
Massachusetts Daily Collegian. 
The offices of the Collegian, which are 
easily recognizable because they look as if a 
tropical storm invaded the Campus Center 
are located in CC113, downstairs from the 
concourse. The facilities there include a 
large newsroom, a complete photographic 
darkroom, a business-advertising office, 
and a graphics room 

It is in the graphics room that a major in- 
novation for the paper will be instituted this 
semester. The Collegian will b e produced 
totally "camera ready" on campus this 
year "Camera ready" means the printed 
page is typeset and pasted up very much as 
you see it now, then sent to the printer (in 
Ware, Mass.) where it is made into a plate 
and printed. 

Of course, a lot happens before what 
yoo're reading gets to the graphics depart- 
ment. Dozens of reporters, the vast majori- 
ty of them volunteers, try to keep up with 
both local events and their classes in time 
for the deadlines both activities require. 
Photographers run around looking for the 
proper lighting, advertising representatives 
run around looking for the revenue that 
funds some 80 percent of the Collegian's 
operations (the remainder of the funding is 
provided by the Undergraduate and 
Graduate Student Senates). 

Once a story is yanked from the typer- 
writer by the reporter, it goes to the news 
"rim , a set of desks where articles are 
edited and laid out (fined onto a page with 
photos, ads and other stories). From there 
everything heads into graphics. 

Several departments contribute written 
material Editors for student affairs, faculty 
and administration, and town and area 
news coordinate coverage of events in 
those areas. The Women's and Black Af 
fairs departments pay particular attention 




UMass is one place 
where you have the 



opportunity to view 



a newspaper from both 



the inside and out. 




to issues of sexism and racism and provide 
information on matters of cor>cern to 
women and Third World students. The Fipe 
Arts and Sports departments round out 
coverage in those aspects of university life. 
All Collegian editors and managers arn 
elected during December by the 
newspaper's staff. The staff is open to any 
UMass student and has ultimate decision- 
making power on the paper A recruitment 
meeting is held near the beginning of every 
semester if you are interested in any of the 
many facets of producing a newspaper, 
keep an eye open for the time of the 
meeting. Or drop by the office sometime 
between classes Or give us a call at 
545 3500. UMass is one place where you 
have the opportunity to view a newspaper 
from t)oth the inside and out. 



Diicii/ioini 3E 



323-5010 




(Hi 



S 



& professional 
consultation in 
selecting the haircut 
best suited for your 
facial Structure... 

all at an 
affordable price 

-shampoo 
personalized 

cut 
-blow drv 
(long hair 
slightly more) 



8 



00 



( Tues & Wed only 

limited to our new customers) 
with tl^is coupon 

65 Univ. Drive 
( Next to Beirs Pizza) 

Call ftr ipDt. 549-5S10 



SmtDKEN" 



Augie^s Tobacco Shop 

of 

Amherst 

Complete tobacco & magaxine shop 

Carrying all types of 





-< 



Pipes 

Tobacco 

Foreign & Domestic 
Cigarettes 

Foreign Magazines & 

Newspapers 
Candy 

Free Advice 



Open 7 days a week 6:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m. 
IF WE DONT HAVE IT YOU DONT NEED IT 

108 N. Peasant fit. Amherst 2:3-7896 

— — — — — — — — — — — COUPON — — — — — — —. — — — — - 



Bring In this coupon for 1 free oz. of our 

blended tobacco. 



L 12, Collegian, Sept 5, 1978 




Yvoil 



>^^^ 



^yC 



pini wcTOli 



<fi 



^ %\ 



11 a.in.-3 a.m. 
256-8587 



FAST. FREE DELIVERY EVERY NIGHT 

Your pizza will arrive hot 
within 30 minutes 

Corner of Main & Triangle 
Amherst 



FREE 




2- / 6 oz. Cokes with small pizza 
4- 7 6 oz. Cokes with large pizza 

No coupon necessary— Just ask; they're free 



This certificate entitles the bearer 

to a reduction 




\HOFF 




ANY LARGE, TWO-ITEM PIZZA ORDERED 
DURING THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER 

256-8587 one coupon per pizza, please 



Sept 5. 1978, Collegian, i 13 



Just Opened AUGUST 1st 

In the KINGSGATE SHOPPING PLAZA 



HAOOMTAMf STOUt 



A 

UNIQUE 

STORE 



i<-'jj 



^^ 



V 



serving 

HOMEOWNERS. 

STUDENTS. 

APARTMENT 

RENTERS. 

CONTRACTORS 



IflfJI. 



BPEQALS 



SALE LIMITED TO MERCHANDISE IN STOCK ""^ SALE THRU 9/ 1 IWITH THIS AD D.C. 



HOME IMPROVEMENT CENTERS 
SPRINGFIELD • NORTHAMPTON 

SELF-SERVICE WITH THE "PERSONAL TOUCH" 
KNOWLEDGEABLE SALESPEOPLE WHO CARE 



e MASTER 
Combination 
PADLOCK 

protect V I *» ■ 
your I 

valuables Northampton 
for only ^^^ 



KEYS MADE 

MB ^B . Honoe & 

ml # R«g style 

^^ ■ Single sided 



CORK 

BULLETIN 

BOARDS 

12" X 18" 

Invaluable 
Paper Organizer 






^ BULBS 



Vac 



'Hea 



"y Duty 



C 4 ggC 



OS'' 



All Plastic 

ROOM 
DARKENING 

WINDOW 
SHADES 

99 Cut 



Cuttf^^S^^ 



B^ 



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4ft. 

DOOR 

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Bulbs 



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^att 



with 

screws 

for 

easy 

mountir^g 



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"^2*222)^^^^ 









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'^'afer 



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c» 






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BO^ 



e» 



ARE 

c/iecfc out our great buys on storage R^^jy . ^^, . 35^^51^ 



J. 



R&G METAL 
CABINETS 



Ten 



^s%o<^ 



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26 



UNFINISHED 
FURNFTURE 

All s.zes, styles & prices ^ K^ryouTrl^^Ss 
Great for dorm rooms, " and budget 

apartments & homes o.. * ,., o* .. a . 

Paint It! Stain If Antique itf\ 



AUTO 
SUPPLIES 



.c 



QUAKER STATE 

10/30 Super Blend 
mn I MOTOR OIL 

56* 



reg 74* qt 

limit 6 qts 



SERVHE 

latex interior 
house paint 

over 20 colors 

97 

gal 



PRESTONE 

Windshield 
Washer 



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WILMAR 

i 1 1 piece 

Combination 

Wrench 

Set 



gal 



YOUR CHOICE 

WINDSHIELD 
WIPERS 



9x12' 
PLASTIC 

DROP 
CLOTH 



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-hi/r PAINT 

^/ KIT I fr^i $Q' 

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Blades - ea. 
or Refills • pr. 



$137 



yOUB 
CHOICE 



ea 



1 gallon 
PAINT 
THINNER 



liMCK TO SCHOOL SPE< 

■fc C^^ 1/2 pint 

LARCOLOID 

quick drying 
enamel paint in a 
wide range of colors 

rntt COUPON 

DC 



COUPON 



STORE HOURS 

9AM-9PM 

I Wtd A Sat 9AM to 6PM 

X STORE OPEN 
Mon. k FrI. NIglitt 



MAIN STORE & 

PANEL CENTER 

65 ST JAMES AVE 

E SfFLO 

732-4300 



PAINT & WALLPAPER STORES 
977 ST JAMES 385 DICKINSON ST. 
E. SPFLO. at the "X" 

785-1083 737-8289 



WAREHOUSE 

SURPLUS PAINT 

517 ST. JAMES AVE. 

Open 9 - 6 Daily 



AUTO SUPPLY 

STORE 

64 ST. JAMES AVE. 

732-4300 



SERV-U HOME CEtiTER 
KINGSGATE SHOPPING PLAZA 
?36 KING ST. NORTHAMPTON 

584-2338 OP*" iMy 

9liii-9piii 



Lf4. Co/hgian, Sept. 5. 1978 



You may need help with the law while attending 
UMass. You may have a question about a lease a 
problem with a landlord, need help in a divorce action 
or even get arrested. You may encounter problems with 
the University systems such^s Financial Aid injustices, 
disciplinary proceedings, or administrative withdrawal 
If you do need legal help remember that the Student 
Legal Services Office (LSO) is here to serve you. If 
you're not sure you have a "legal" problem call us 
anyway and see if we can help you. 

The Student Legal Services Office, located in 922 
Campus Center (tel no. 545 19%) provides free legal 
counsel and representation in Hampshire and Franklin 
counties for all SATF (Undergraduate) and Graduate 
fee paying students in civil and university matters. 

A staff p)erson is available during office hours to help 
students determine whether their legal problem will 
require simple advice or representation. An ap- 
pointment IS then scheduled as soon as is possible. 
When a student group requires legal counsel, advice 
or research, the Legal Services Governing Board (a 
group of 5 Undergraduates and 3 Graduate students 
who make policy decisions for'the LSO) asks that a wnt 
ten request be submitted to them, wfiereupon at the 
next board meeting all such requests will be reviewed 
and scheduled according to available resources and 
benefit to the largest number of students 

In emergency situations, (e.g. arrest, eviction), 
itudents should contact the LSO immediately. An 

Miswf f my service answers emergency calls after hours. 

Referrals are offered to local private attorneys and 
advocacy groups when the LSO cannot handle a 
student's case. 

The staff presently consists of four full time attor- 
neys, siK student paralegal interns, and two admin- 
istrative coordinators 

For your protection and information we have listed 
l>elow the usual procedures in the case of an arrest We 
would advise you to read it carefully, cut it out, and 
save It. should the need ever arise for such information. 
If you ^e arrested call theLSO 

Have a s^fe. enioyable school year 



SUMMONS: Criminal proceedings may be started 
against a person without forma/ arrest This occurs 
when a persop charges you with a crime and the court 
issues a summons [criminal complaint] directing you to 
appear in the court to answer the charges. Failure to 
appear in court may result in a warrant for your arrest. 

ARREST A police officer may seek a summons for 
your arrest. If you are arrested, you will be taken to the 
UMass Campus Police or the Amherst Police Station. If, 
you are arrested, you are not required to give the police' 
any information other than identification. At the time of 
your arrest, the police should inform you of your rights 
as follows: f\You have the right to remain silent 
2\Any thing you say can be used against you in court 3\ 
You have the right to talk with a lawyer for advice 
before ansvtrenng any questions and to have her him 
with you during questioning; 4\ If you cannot afford a 
lawyer, one will be appointed for you before any 
questioning if you wish; 51 If you decide to answer 
quesiiuns now without a lawyer present, you will still 
have the right to stop answering at any time until you 
talk to a lawyer. All stops or detentions by the police do 
not result in arrest or criminal charges. You are advised 
to consult an attorney if you feel you have been illegally 
detained. 

BOOKING "Booking" is the term used for the 
procedure whereby a students' identification is 
ascertained, checks for criminal warrants in other 
/urisdictions are made, and identifying statistics, in- 
cluding fingerprints, are put on file If you are in 
carcerated pending payment of bail, the possessions 
within your control at that time are taken from you. 
inventoried end put into an envelope for safe keeping 
dunng the incarceration Be sure to obtain a receipt for 
your personal property. 

INTERROGATION y< the police desire information from 
you. they may question you before incarceration. If this 
occurs It usually means that they do not have enough 
evidence to charge you or they may want more 
evidence to insure your conviction. The questioning 
may be subtle and friendly or intentionally intimidating. 
Whatever you say wiil most likely be used against you. 
You are strongly fdvised not to talk to the police 
without first talking to your lawyer. 



LSO 



BAIL SETTING PROCEDURES: You have a right to a 
hearing with the Clerk of courts is arrested during a time 
when the court is not in session. The Clerk goes to the 
various jails each evening and on Saturday and Sunday 
for these hearings. If a bond is set which is not ac- 
ceptable, you have an automatic review of the Clerk's 
decision before a judge at the Court's next session. If 
this IS necessary, the student should fill out an 
"Aplication for Pre Trial Release" available from the 
/ailer. This is in essence, a request for release on your 
own signature. The judge will then set a personal 
recognizance bond, a reduced bond, or the same bond. 

BONDING If a bond is set. it can be posted by cash, by 
bail bond, or by surety. It is easiest to post cash bond if 
possible. Friends or relatives can pay cash at the jail or 
you can sign a Power of Attorney which would give a 
friend the authorization to draw money out of your bank 
account If you do not have sufficient cash to post 
bond, but have access through friends or relatives to 
unmortgaged real property or substantial personal 
property, two choices are available A surety bond can 
be posted or a bailperson brought in It is better to post 
a surety bond, if possible because the property is 
eventually returned in full, whereas with a bondsperson, 
the 5 or 10 percent of the bail paid to him her is not 
returned If the friend or relative can post a surety bond, 
that person must take proof of the assets to the Clerk 
where the proof will be submitted and the surety bond 
forms filled out No cash need be paid for this type of 
bond except the Clerk s tee of $5 or $10 If a bond 
person is used, you will have to pay 5 or 10 percent of 
the bail in cash to the bondsperson and provide a real or 
personal property security to the bondsperson The 
cash IS not returned. This means of bonding should be 
used only as a last resort. 



Japanese American uiui 
Resource* Judiaca Purpose 
IS to promote awareness of the 
Jewish community and its 
culture to all those affiliated 
with the University 
Judo Club . 

Opportunities Extension 
Krishna Yoga Society 
Kundalani Yoga Club 
Kung Fu Club 
Lab Technology Club 
Landscape operations club 
Law, Science, and Ethic* 
Society 

Legal Service* Office -see 
feature m this section, and in 
the SGA's Student To 
Student. 

Legislative Task Force 
Lesbian Union-Purpose is to 
facilitate interpersonal growth 
and support among lesbian 
women, to enable this group 
to become a chohesive 
educational force, to promote 
a better understanding of 
lesbian women, and to 
establish communication with 
the women of the feminist 
movement on campus. 
Lutheran Students 

Organization--Purpose is to 
provide opportunities for 
fellowship, worship and 
service among members. 
Massachusets Political 
Economy Collective 
goal IS to gain a general 
knowledge of Massachusetts 
political economy. 
Massachusetts Third World 
Alliance 

Massachusetts Daily 
Collegian- -see feature in this 
section. 

Mass PIRG see Student to 
Student 

Motorcycle Coop 
Music Theatre Guild-- 
Purpose IS to promote all 
aspects of musical comedy, 
drama, and opperetta Open to 
all University students. 

Naiads 

Navigators-Purpose is to 
present the claims of Jesus 
Chnst to the students, and to 
help those interested in their 
development and growth as 
Christians. 

New America Movement 
Newman Club-Purpose is tc 
promote a community ap 
preciation of our Christiar 
traditions. 

Non-Traditional Student 
Assembly-Purpose is to 
support non- traditional 
students in the surviving the 
University. 

Northampton volunteers-- 
This work is part time at the 
Northampton State Hospital in 
duties that students choose. 
Nummo News-Purpose is to 
provide a paper with » third 

CONTINUED 

ON PAGE 24 



Go back to^^class-ics. 



55 




The Lodge has every- 
thing you need to put 
together a wardrobe for 
back to school . . . from 
chinos to jeans. Dresses 
to skirts. Laver. Wrap. 
Mix and match. Put on a 
blazer and have a whole 
new look. Add boots, 
belts, hats. Dress the 
way you want. Casual. 
Easy. So come into the 
Lodge . . . casual clothes 
for a casual lifestyle. 



Lodge cowl neck 

velours, $19.00. 

Lodge chino-cut wide 

wale cords, $18.95. 

Tuffi Lynn open collar 

sweaters, $11.00. 

Men's Lodge label 

plaid shirts, $13.00. 

Men's chinos, $12.95. 

Men's crew neck 

Shetland sweaters, $12.95. 

Amherst. Route 9 next to McDonald's. 584-9690. 

® Open Monday to Friday 10:00-9:00. Saturday 10:00-6:00. 



Sept. 5, 1978. Collegian. L 15 



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Lechmere 
has one off the largest selections off 
' Fi equipment in New England! 



Lechmere has a liberal 10-day money-back 
.., .,. . . . . .^^^.. 



and this. 

Lechmere has a liber 

guarantee. We stand firmly behind thati 

and this... 

Lechmere sells only brand name merchandise. 

and this... 

Lechmere prices are the same as or lower than 
leading competitors! 

and this... 

Lechmere knows what its talking about. 



Lechmere's Hi Fi Shop is so big, so diverse and has such 
depth that it's really a specialized store within a store. 
So be prepared to be surprised when you come in to see 
and hear our sound set-ups. 

You'll see names such as Pioneer, KLH, Garrard, Kenwood, 
AR, TEAC, Sansui, EPI, JBL, Technics, Sony, Sharp, 
Scott. B.I.C., Jensen, Audio-Technica. Dual, ESS. 

You'll hear sounds that are sweet, soft, loud, 
brassy, mellow and rich. 

You'll talk to experts. . people who make Hi-Fi their 
avocation as well as their vocation. 

If it's time for you to check out a i^ew Hi-Fi system; 

components or just a needle. . . it's time to 

check out a new Hi-Fi store... Lachm«i«, th« Mora stor*. 



CHARGE IT TNE AFFORDABLE WAY! 

Ask about our Shawmut/ Lechmere easy payment plan. 

CONVENIENT STORE HOURS: CAMBRIDOE, Mon. thru Fri., 10 A.M. to »:A) P.M , 
Sat., 9 A.M. to 6 P.M., SPRINGFIELD. DEDHAM, Mon. thru Sat., 10 A.M. to 9:30 
P M., DANVER8, Mon. thru Sat., 10 A.M. to 10 P M., MANCHESTER, N.H., Mon. 
thru Sat. 9:30 A.M. to 9:30 P.M., Sun., 12 Noon to 6 P.M. 



LECHMEREj 

WHERE YOU POCKET THE DIFFERENCE % cf || 



L t€. Collegian, Sept. 5, 1978 



THE LIBRARY 



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In October of 1974, when the last brick was sup- 
posedly put in Its place, the worlds tallest library 
received its official academic blessing. On hand for the 
ritual was professor emeritus of English, Frederick S. 
Troy In his dedication speech he told the gathering that 
"A great university deserves a great library. A mediocre 
one does not. It is as simple and crucially important as 
that " 

Despite the recent reorganuation of sonne crucially 
iniportunt bricks and athe construction of a wood and 
wire barricade surrounding the tower we do indeed 
have a great library Its availability to students and 
fac'ilty of the Five Colleges is not as well publicized as 
the library staff would like; hence, what follows are the 
how to's, do's and don'ts.of using this tremendous 
resource, research, and in many ways entertainment 
center. 

The library system 

The Library System consists of the 28 story University 
Library, several branch libraries and various reading 
rooms The University Library houses most of the 
holdings in the social sciences and hunnanities. Principal 
branch libraries «e: 
Morrill Biological'Sciences. Library 

On the 2nd floor of Morrill Science Center; contains 
biological and gtjological material. 
Music Library 

A non circulating collection of thematic indexes, 
scores and recordings, housed in Room 149 of the Fine 
Arts Center. 
Physical Sciences Library 

On the 2nd floor of the Graduate Research Center; 
includes materials in engineering, chemistry, 
mathematics, water resources, computer science, food 
technology, wood technology, physics, astronomy, and 
related fields. 
Five College Libraries 

The five Valley schools jointly operate the Hampshire* 
Interlibrary Cenler (HILC), a collection of inr>portant but 
infrequently used research materials located on C level 
of the Robert Frost Library at Aniherst College. HILC 
materials circulate only to faculty and graduate 
students, but may be consulted by all members of the 
University community or obtained on Interlibrary Loan. 

UMass students and faculty have direct borrowing 
privileges at the mam libraries of Amherst, Hampshire, 
Mount Holyoke, and Smith Colleges. 

Catalog information* 

The card catalog on the mam floor of the University 
Library lists, with the exception of certain classes of 
materials such as government publications, the 
holdings of all parts of the Library System, including 
branch libraries and reading rooms It is divided into two 
>eriions: 
Author and Title Catalog 

Cont.iins cards for names of persons and agencies 
considered to »>e authors of publications. Most works 
also have title cards in this catalog; periodicals are listed 
hern Ijy title and also in the Pioneer Valley Union Listot 
Journal and Serial Holdings. 
Subject Catalog 

Contdins cards indicating the subject areas of 
iiinterials. To find the exact subject headings used, 
consult tfie Library of Congreee List of Subject 
Readings, located on tables near the card catalog 
Pioneer Valley Union List of Journal and Sujial 

foldings 

Periodicals in the UMass system and in other major 
collections in the Valley are listed alphabetically here by 
title with locations, call numbers and volumes held. 

The librarians at the Reference Desk will gladly provide 
assisttince in using these catalogs and in locating other 
Items, such as government publications which are not 
fully listed. 



Resources and services 

Archives 

Located on the 25th floor, contains a collection of 
material relating to the University of Massachusetts and 
several groups of personal and historical manuscripts 
Audiovisual Department 

Located in Goodell Building In addition, the mam 
Library houses an audiovisual reserve room on the 5th 
floor, for course related materials, and the necessary 
viewing and listening equipment. 
Computer Search Service 

Computerized literature searches of bibliographic data 
bases in the sciences and social sciences are done in the 
Reference Department. For further information, ,n 
eluding an estimate of charges, contact the Reference 
Department 

Government Documents 

The Documents collection on the 21st floor houses 
official publications of the United States United 
Nations and Commonwealth of Massachusetts Most of 
these materials are not listed in the mam card catalog 
but are accessible through special indexes. 
Interlibrary Loan 

For faculty and graduate students engaged in research 
the Interlibrary Loan service obtains materials not 
available in the UMass Library syctem. Undergraduates 
may also use it for n^tenals in the Valley area. 
Maps 

A collection of approximately 90,000 sheet maps 
geological and topographic, demographic and 
historical, is in Room 269 of the Morrill Science Center. 
Microforms 

Microtext copies of newspapers, government ar 
chives, and many other types of research materials are 
in the microforms room on the mam floor, along with 
re<Klinq equipment. 

Newspapers 

Current issues of many foreign and domestic 
newspapers are shelved on the far side of the main 
floor Back files are pnmanly available in the Microforms 
Room. 

Periodical Room 

A reading room for current issues of all periodicals in 
the University Library is on the 5th floor. 
Photocopying 

Coin operated copying machines are located on the 
mam. 1st, 2nd, 5th, 12th, 15th, 18th, 21st, and 24th 
floors. The COpy Center on the mam floor provides a 
copy service and change for the machines. 



(0 



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Reference 

The main floor houses the non curculating Reference 
collection Reference librarians are available to give help 
in using this material and card catalogs, as well as to 
provide other kinds of assistanc in making use of the 
library system. 
Scores 

Thematic indexes, scores, and recordings are housed 
in the Music Library. 
Special Collections 

Non curculating rare and fragile materials, unusual 
editions, and individual manuscripts are kept in this area 
on the 25th floor. 

General information 

Campus Phones: on each floor in the elevator lobby, 
' St floor east lobby, and main floor. 
Computer Terminals: available for use in Room 720 
on the 7th floor. 

Food and Drink: not permitted in any part of the 

library. 

Handicapped Persons: elevator key aailable at the exit 

control desk. Those unable to pass through the main 

entrance turnstiles may usethe west lobby entrance. 

Room 766 has been equipped with special apparatus for 

the use of partially-sighted persons (key available at the 

'st floor Circulation Desk). 

Lost and Found: located in the library office on the 1st 

floor on weekdays and at the exit control desk evenings 

and weekends. 

Public Telephones: 1st floor, west lobby. 

Restrooms: on main, 2,4,5,7,10, 13, 16, 19, 22, 25, 

and 26 There are facilities for handicapped persons ori 

the riiain floor. 

Smoking: permitted on|y in limited areas: on Floor 26 

in Room 2604, and in Room 2 on each study floor 7 2 

1002 1302, ir02, 1902, 2202. 

Study Rooms are assigned for a semester at a time by 

academic departments. Some maybe obtained on a 

day to day basis; check atthe Reserve Desk, 2nd floor. 



LIBRARY DIRECTORY 

Archives 

Audiovisual Department 
Audiovisual Reserve 
Central Serials Record 
Circulation Office 
College Catalogs 
Government Documents 
tnfor nation 
Interlibrary Loan 
Library Office 
Library Tours 
Lost and Found 
Map Room 
Microforms Room 
Music Library 



Morrill Library 

Newspapers 

Periodicals Current 

Photocopying Center 

Physical Sciences Lib. 

Public Services 

Reference Desk 

Renewals 

Reserve 

Special Collections 

Telephone Books 



'An- ' 



''1^ f9l 



CHRIS BOURNE PHOTO 



25th floor 
Goodell, Rm. 514 
5lh floor 
Mam floor 
2nd floor 
Mam floor 
21st floor 
Mam floor 
Mam floor 
1st floor 
Mam floor 
1st floor 

Rm 269, Morrill 
Mam floor 
Rm 149 
Fine Arts Ctr. 

Morrill 
Main floor 
5th floor 
Mam floor 
Grad Res Ctr. 
Mam floor 
Mam floor 
2nd floor 
2nd floor 
25th floor 
Mam floor 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CLASSIFICATION as us- 
ed in the UMass-Amherst Libraries 

Note This IS a recreational, browsing guide only. For 
research materials always consult the card catalog on 
the mam floor or ask for assistance at the Reference 
Desk. 

A General Works 

Philosophy, Psychology 
Religion 

Includes Archaeology, Genealogy, and General 

Biography 

History General and 

« 

Old World 

Geography, Anthropology, Recreation, and Physical 

Education 

Social Sciences: Including Economics and Business 



H HL 

HM HZ 



Sociology, Social Psychology, and Social Problems 

Political Science 
Law 

Education 
Music 
Fine Arts 

Language and Literature (Classical, Romance, Ger- 
manic, Slavic, Oriental, African), 
Drama and Cinema, Linguistics 

Literature (American, British, Germanic) 
Science (Mostly housed in Morrill) 



Medicine: Including Nursing and 
Public Health 

Agriculture 

Technology 

Military Science 

Naval Science 

Bibliography, Library Science 

(Many works housed in Morrill Biological and Physical 

Sciences Libraries) 



PlHjne 

545 2780 
5 2454 
5 3533 
5 3968 
5 2622 

5 2765 
5 0150 
5 0553 
5 0284 
5 0150 
5 0284 
5 2733 
5 3966 

5 2870 
5 2674 

5 3306 
53860 
5 1370 
5 0466 
5 ()t50 
5 2622 
5.2358 
5 0274 



8th floor 
?()ih floor 
20tli floor 

15th floor 

15th fl(jor 
14th floor 

14th flogr 
I8fh floor 

17th floor 

23rd floor 
?3rfl floor 
17th floor 
9fti floor 
9th floor 



12th floor 
llth floor 
24th floor 



20th floor 

24th floor 
24th floor 
14th floor 
14th floor 
8th floor 



PAT DOBBS PHOTO 



Compiled by 
E. Patrick McQuade and Debbie Schaeffer 



L-18. Qo/tegian. Sept 5, 1978 



, 



Introducing... 

HERBARIUM 

ftAAAAAM A A #» A A A A A 



1 



i 



4^ SICK AND TIRED 
OF TRIPPING OVER 
O THOSE BOOKS? 



11 UNFINISHED Fk<RNITURE 

IS THE ANSWER! 
18 •Low low prices 
•High quality 

The area's first herb & spice spoculty shop jj •Variety 

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Featuring: 

*High quality medicinal herbs 

• Lowest prices for cooking spices 

• Hand-crafted gifts 

• Potpourri Ef glass jars 

• Oils for body & crafts 

• Books & incense ingredients 



Mam Street Center 
2rKl Floor 



150 Mam Street 
Northampton. Mass. 



\ 

Men Sat 9:30-5:30 ( 
Thurs til 9:00 



i 



WELCOME STUDENTS! 



Tk« tlore Kith 
>«" in mind! 



Words can't 
.describe what 
a great store 
the Pizza Place 
is; you have to 
try it yourself, 
and we know 
you will be 
happy you 
did... 



Sun-Thurs 
llam-lam 
Fri-Sat 
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Rte. 116 

Siinderland 

665-7066 

665-7067 



BUY NAKED AND SAVE! 

We have a large selection of 

unfinished bookcases and desks. 

Streak on down to 

549 College Hwy. 
(Rt. 10 €r 22) 
Southwick, MA 
569-3048 




UNFINISHED 

FURNITURE 
HOUSE H 








MUSIC FOR ALL INSTRUMENTS 

classical, popular, folic, jazz, etc. . . piano, guitar, voice, string, brass, 
percussion, woodwind, Henle, Peters, Schirmer, International, Schott, 
Dover, Norton, etc. . . 



GUITARS 

Guild, Gurian, Alvarez-Yari, Yamaha, used instruments 



ACCESSORIES 

DIManio, Barcus Berry, Bill Lawrence, MXR, Morley, Electro-Hannonix, 
Hohner, Aulos, Yamaha, ZenOn, Qrover, Schaller, Holton, Micro, Ai 
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Seth Thomas, Flageolet, Clarke, Oscar Schmidt, PIrastro, Don^lnant, 
Hill, Utin Percussion, Prb-Mark, Hinger, Vic FIrth, etc. . . 



Amherst Carriage Shops 
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Amherst, Mass. 01002 
(413) 549-1728 




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mafor courses to help start 
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Register at Amherst's 
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including 

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THE O JAYS 

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lr>cludes the million selling sir>gie 

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L 20. Co'ogMfi. Sept 5, 1978 



BIKE 
CLUB 



The B' "liib promotes bicycle use and enioyment 

It ts op* e entire five college community. 



A ma)or 
are usui« 
They vai>. ' 
the M» ' 
longer ai 
1 100 mile 
Other bic v 
New Hai' \ 
to 60 m. 
members 

OverntglM tours are orgamjed on weekends and vaca 
tKjns They usually involve driving by car to the area 
where tounug will take place Such tours have gone to 
Cape Cod Martha's Vineyard. Connecticut. Vernnont, 
New Hampshire, and Rhode Island Even longer and 
more amhitious tours require vacation periods, but are 
much moft- rewarding The Club has organi/ed Spring 
Break tours since 1974 Two tours have gone to Penn 
sylvania in one case including Philadelphia, the other 
more westward included the Amish atea Two others 
have gone to Tennessee in about the same area near 
Nashville Both years, the tour concluded with a show 
at the Grand Ole Oprey in Nashville Each year, the Spr 
ing Break tour area is decided by he participants The 
1979 tour may go to southern Virginia In June of 1978. 
the Club (along with the Outing Club) cosponsored a 
post finals tour m Nova Scotia for a week 

The overnight Club tours are either camping or hoste<- 
ing tours 

Camping tours require tents and cooking equipment 
which may have to be carried by the cyclists, unless the 
tour uses a sag wagon" which carries equipment from 
one campsite to the next and which picks up any cyclist 
who IS unable to continue while on the road 

Hosteliiu) tours involve the use of American Youth 
Hostels (AYH) which are basic facilities with kitcheos 
dormitories, and common rooms, so that you need 
biinu onlv food and Imnen. The Club is affiliated with 
AYH and so Club members on Club trips need not be 
individual AYH members to use hostels 

The Club has done complex tours, which involve dif 
ferent qioups using different routes around common 
points For example, one tour to the Standish 
Museums Hostel in East Bndgewater involved three 
touring groups One cycled 120 miles from Amherst to 
East Bndgewater. in one day Another group drove to 
Woodstock Connecticut and toured 60 miles out of 
Connecticut, across Rhode Island, and into 
Masssachusetts to East Bndgewater The third group 
drove to Milton and cycled 30 miles south to the Hostel 
The entire; qroup then spent tfie remainder of the long 
weekend usmg the East Bndgewater hostel as a base for 
day trips tn the area such as to Miles Standish State 
Forest, which has bicycle paths 

RACING 

The Club Racing Team treT>s regularly and this past 
year, participated m intercollegiate races in the nor 
theast for the first time Last semester, the Team par 
Tirip.iterl in races at West Point. Yale, and Dartmouth 

The Club has co sponsored local races with area clubs 
under the sanction of the United States Cycling Federa 
tion such as the Memorial Day Cnterium which attracts 
racers from all over New England and New York. The 
Club will continue to assist in supporting such potential 
ly national events m the area, and hopes to be able to fur 
ther assist m area racing events As the ranks of Club 
racers increase, the Club anticipates being able to 
or(iani/f' more numerous events such as time trials 

SPECIAL EVENTS 

A trip to the Pepsi 24 hour Bicycle Marathon in 
tral Park in New York City was organi/ed for the 
Memorial Day weekend The Club assisted in the 
GEAR 75 the Great Eastern Rally of the League of 
American Wheelmen (LAW), m 1975 when it was held at 
U Mass The Club helped in the state wide Pedal 
Against Pollution tour which used U.Mass. as its first 
stop over on a cross state demonstration tour. 

BICYCLE COOPERATIVE 

The Bicycle Club helped form a Bicycle Cooperative, 
which for a lime was part of the Club itself, to help 
everyone obtain good equality equipment at modest 
cost, and to help improve people's understanding and 
confidence in their machines. The Cooperative opened 
in April of this year and expects to expand the range of 
equipment available as the volume of business in 
creases. 

CLUB INFORMATION 

Bicycle repair, maintenance, and techm 
que demonstrations and discussions are a regular 
feature of Club meetings There are often slide shows of 
Club tours and races. People are encouraged to show 
pictures and slides of their own tours and to talk about 
their experiences at Club meetings, which are usually 
weekly during the milder months of the year. Informa 
tion on the Club, including meeting notices, touring and 
racing sign up sheets, a swap board, officer identifica 
tion, etc . IS available on the Club bulletin board. ' 
located in the Student Union across from the ride 
boards near the entrance to the Ballroom. The Bicycle 
Cooperative is located down the hall from the bulleting 
board, nearly opposite the post office windows. Hours 
are posted on the door. 



TOURING 

vity of the Club is bicycle touring Day trips 

iirgani/ed on weekends in good weather. 

:m short couple hour tours such as circling 

)ke range, or to other collrje campuses, to 

ore difficult day trips such as century tours 

one day) which are less frequently rur. 

'• tours of medium range like foliage tours to 

hire are more comrrxjn and range from 30 

- or nx>re Day trips are open to non 





Sept. 5, 197&, Voltegian. L-21 



the 



University Store 



SPECIAL STORE HOURS 

TUES., SEPT. 5 1 

WED., SEPT. 6 > 9am 9nr« 

THURS., SEPT.?) 9a-m.-9p.m. 

FRI.. SEPT. 8-9 a.m.-5 p.m. 
SAT.. SEPT. 9-10 a.m. -4 p.m. 



Ramairtder 
of aamflstar 



CALCULATORS 

The best brands Er models at the best pricesi 



Mon.-Fri 9a m -5p.m. 
Sat. Ila.m -4p.r 



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Tl 1790 -Til 750 -Tn025 



Texas Instruments 



tHAI 



EL5005-EL5806-EL1166-EL5001-EL1154 



6 X 9 ft. cushion-back rug 

Good-tookir>g polypropylene pile resists 
stains takes lots of foot traffic' Ho pad 
ding needed thanks to D.shiony back At 
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rairKhadis availab**. 

prle»a wpW s«r 



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FuN, ewr rag. 4.4t 
Pkg. Of acMM 



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Combed cottoo/pctyestar; slight irrags 
won t impair wear At laaal 80 par atora 
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FX8000-CQ81 



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Jean Sale! 

denims 
ond 



only $6.99 

a good selection 
but only while 

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on our special 

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BUY 1 
GET 2 FREE 

n-^ value 
regulorly 59" 

SPECIAL 39' 

while they last 



LAMP 
SPECIAL 



no 



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A VERy SPECML S?ILE 



twin Size 



2»9 



I78& 
our raa. : 



eur rag. 4.29 
'BircfiM' ahaatt 

Gardaivfraah ae awi c 
print on ca r a fiea 
coMon/potyoalar. Hm^m 



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Full 
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9iut rag. 4.29 



St. Mary's 
blankets 

Nancy's fancy floral 
pHnt on acryAc wHth 
nylon taflala binding. 73 
X W ataa fita twin/full 
bod. A MMa you'll 



L. 
rag. 249 

crisp floral tiara 
Oacron* po f yaa t ar ba- 
data; mocMna araah. At 
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avallabla. 

36 L. 

our rag. 2.79 1J8 

Vatonoa. 

our rag. 2.49 1.78 

Swag, 

ourr«|.3.M 3.18 



27" floor cuahkma 

Hareulon* olaAn cov- 
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%m^m 1.S1 



our rag. 6.99 aa. 
Tantaay' blankets 
Mad« by Boaconi 
AcryMc: nylon bound. 
Machina laaah and dry. 
So ao(t. ««rm and 
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fMa twfci/hjii bada. 

••va S.ti 



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Lamps 



White* Yellow«Orange 
Red«Black»Brown 



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83-L. 
o*M^ rag. 5.99 

shaar votis pansis 
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Vr- 83 L 
our rag. 9.99 

opsn>waav« drapes 

tec h l n a a w atiat >la 
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t«'Laurrsg. 11.99, 6.96 

s«v« 1.SS 



fust say: 
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J99 

print tatMadoths 

Take your pick — 60 
rouTKl or 52 X 70~ sizaa. 
AH, wipa-ciaan vinyi; 
flannai backed. At laaat 
48 par store — rain- 
checks availaMa. 



our rag. 1.99 

runnar ruga 

Candy-atrtpad favorlla! 
24- X 60 ate- r1^ for 
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avaHaMa. 



18x2r 

rug remnants 

Fantaatic aaaortmant. 
Woola, nytona. acrytica, 
mora . . . handaoma 
coiors! Great for acallar 
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Pkg of 10 Zayre pencils 

3 for 99c 

At laast 200 par store — 

no ralnchacka. 

80 ct (#6 3/4) 

envelopes 3 for 99c 

At laast 300 par store — 

no ralnchacka. 



40ct (#10) envelopes 
3 for 99c 

At laast 200 per store — 
no ralnchacka. 

Flair Pens 3 for 99c 
At laaat 144 per stoa - 
r>o ralnchacka. 





our rag. 2.89 
Window Shades 

Eaay-cten vfaiyi ~ 
room-darkanara! 37H" x 
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'Zayre playing cards 
(F>oker or bridge) 

3 for 99c — , - ^- 

At least 400 par atore — V'i x 450 ) 3 for 99c 
no ralnchacka. At iaaat 300 \imx store 

Zayre invisible tape " ^ '^T^*f^\ 

(% X 300) 3 for 99c 50-sheef Legal Pads 

At test 170 par atore - VJ^J^^^ _ . 

no rainchackV ^* '••■< 1} P«' "^o^ " 

no ralnchacka. 

TM 



Sale in effect thru September 16, 1978 



440 Russell St., Hadley 




9 SWEDrLER H ^LE PRICE 

mars 700 ^1 I4.9|f 

** pen set IH L/ST V}^\Ql - 30^ 
TWL mj STORE \i}\TW\H /\ STORE 




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t 30 AM TO S 10 P M 

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Sept 5, t978,- Coffegian, L 23 



CO 



Tuneupi from $25 

Open 7 days a week 



ll^mi 



Liquors 



266 6039 "^ B^lc^Wftown Rd , Amherst (Rte. 9) 
Sun Thurs7 10 



across from Poor Richards 
Fri, Sat til 1 am 



(CdMDmtsmi' 




OF CAMBRIDGE 



■ . . now in Amherst Shopping Ctr. 



for all your DORMITORY NEEDS: 



WELCOMES YOU 
TO THE VALLEY 

Here are a few of the many items that have 

helped to make us the party headquarters 
of the Pioneer Valley: 



^ I li f 



SIIKKTS • PILLOV^S 
•M\I)K\S HKDSPKKXDS ^ 
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M COMPLETE SNACK UNE 



MAIN 



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A 




AMHERST 
CENTER 



RT. 9 COLLEGE ST. 

*near Voormichards 



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come in and quench 

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HOISEWARES: .\ klll link „k famous name moisewares 

an.) .small appliaii.-o. B..wU. Ov.n Disl.os Cas^r^los .Mixii.f: B..wl,. 
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P..|.|»r,. T»aM,.r ()v,.n>. Ila.iil.i.r^. Maker^. P„lal„ Kmr... Hot I),,;; 
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Rent a refrigerator from... 

^ _ SPIRIT HAUS 

REFRIGERATOR RENTAL 

338 College St. (Rt. 9 East) 
Amherst 256-8433 253-5384 






X 







$50.00 + tax-academic year (Sept.-May 15) 

$30.00 + tax-semester (Sept.-Dec. 15th) 

$10.00 refundable deposit. 

Free delivery to UMass. 

Delivery information available for 5.Colleges 

3 Cubit ft. models with separate freezer compartment. 



AMHKR8T SHOPPING CENTER 175 UNIVERSITY DRIVE, AMHERST 

Right behind The Steak Out 
OPEN Mon .-Fri. 9:30-9:00 Sat. ^til 6:00 253-5044 



OPEN TILL 11 PM DAILY 



You have made us the largest liquor store in the area 

Thank You. 



McCallum Advertising 



van. Sept. 5, 1978 




Largest Subs in the Amherst Area 

ERIC'S GIANT SUBS 



- Hot t Cold Subs - 

Turkty, Roast B«ef, Hot Pastrami 
Sausago, Tuna, Ham, and moral 




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Frtod Chickan, Saaffood and Soups 



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259.fS21 



314 ColloQO St. 






world perspective tor the 
University. 

Northern Educational 
Service Tutoring Program- 
Purpose is to improve the 
academic performance of 
disadvantaged children in the 
existing structure of the 
Springfield School System 

Okinawan Karate Club 
Opportunities for ex- 
Oiffenders -Purpose is to 
create a new awareness in the 
ex -offender, and to give them 
counseling, housing, referrals, 
to employment, social ser- 
vices, and peer support. 
Outfront Collective-- 
Purpose of this group is to 
move forward until the 
inequities between employer 
and employee no longer exist. 
Outing Club-' Purpose is to 
promote camping, hiking, 
mountain climbing, and 
various outdQor activities. 

People's Gay Alliance- 
Purpose is to provide ari 
opportunity for gay people to 
develop a positive seff-concept 
in order to establish respect for 
the gay community. 
People's Market-Purpose is 
to provide good organic food 
at low prices for the UMass 
community. Located on the 
k>bby fkx>r of the Student 
Union building, around tf>e 
corner from the SU 



f® 



Take a friend to 
lunch at Hardees. Andi 
try our new Big Roast 
Beef Sandwich. It 
couldnt be better, so 
we nxxie it bigger. 
With 50% more 
tender roast beef, 
slow cooked till it s 
tender and |uicy, sliced 
thin and piled high, with 
your choice of three 
souces, on a toasted 
sesame seed bun. 

And when you 
buy one Big Roost 
Beef with this 



^4y 



^ 



.V 



coupon, your 
friend can fill 
up for free. 



h 



r? 



People's News Stand Co- 
op--Purpose is to provide for 
student access to alternative 
periodicals and pamphlets 
which are not readily available 
through local news stands in 
the Campus Center and 
Student Union. 

Philosophy Club "Oh, 
Immanuel Kant was a real piss- 
ant who was very rarely stable, 
Heidegger Heidegger was a 
boozy beggar who could drink 
you under the table, David 
Hume could out-consume 
Schopenhauer and Hegel"-- 
etc. Purpose of the club is to 
talk about universal subjects 
that should not even be 
touched by undergraduates, 
drop as many obscure names 
as possible, and drink to ex- 
cess. 

Pioneer Valley Juggling 
Association 

Plant and Soil Science Club- 
-Purpose is to broaden student 
awareness of plants and soil. 
Polish American 

Association 
Pre- Dental Club 
Pre-Medlcal Society- 
Purpose is to keep its members 
aware of developments in 
medical schools and the 
profession. 
Pre Vet Club 

Program Coiincll Art 
Committaa 

Protestant Christian 
Council-Purpose is to provide 
the opportunities for 
protestant students arnl other 
students to engage in 
ecumenical discussions, to 
inquire into the nature of their 
faith, and to respond to 
university issues. 
Recreation Club -Purpose is 
to provide those interested in 
recreation with activities that 
will benefit members and lead 
to professional improvement . 
Red Cross Student 
Volunteers 

■5tosag -Purpose is to publish 
en annual yearbook for all 
stockbridge school of 
Agriculture students. * 
Strategy Games Club-- 
Purpose is to provide the 
university community with a 
unique and enjoyable way to 
explore the ideal of conflict in 
history. 

Student Automotive 
Workshop-Purpose is to pro- 
vide a low cost way students 
to fix their cars themselves. 
Student Consumer Affairs 
Council 

Student Nurses Association 
Student Government 
Association-that's all of us. 
(see feature on page ) 
Student Union Crafts Shop 
-Located on the bottom floor 
of the Student Union Building, 
down the hall from the Hatch, 
this shop is open for any 
UMass student to use. Only 
cost is for materials. 















- «^^al.^ *^»»- 



YOUR 

CAN TirrONE POR nuE, 



BuroNi MEwaH[a!Mfrq^ 

GETONEFREE. 

Good at all participating Hardees. Please present this coupon before ordering. 

One coupon per customer, please. Customer must pay any sales tax due 

on the purchase price. This coupon not good in combination with any other offers. 



Hardees of Hadfey 

430 Russell Street 

Hadley, Mass. 



Hacdeer 



Coupon expires Sept. 16 



Back to School 
WATERBED SPECIAL 

• Classic Delttxtt:(^Nt||ress 

• Safe%vav lliiler ] ^ 

jp^Timr Trrrrr TTffn! jHip imt 








m^M 



South Hadlev Center 533-4194 




Student Video Project- Pur 
pose is to provide the op 
portunity for student access to 
video equipment, and to even- 
tually develop a cable TV 
system at UMass. 
Students of Objecticism 
Students Against the Pre- 
sent System-Purpose is to 
provide an informal forum for 
the discussion of the various 
aspects of governance struc- 
ture, to create and disseminate 
position papers, and informa 
tion concerning topics covered 
in group discussion. 
Students UnKed for Public 
° Education— Purpose is to pro- 
mote the cause for quality in 
public higher education. Their 
goal is to organize students in 
order to defend ttieir rights to 
higher education, and to canv 
paign for related issues on 
campus. 

Squash Club-Purpose is to 
provide the University with an 
opportunity to play the raquet 
sport on a competitive, in- 
structional, and recreational 
basis. 

Tennis Club 
The Cape Cod Club 
Third World Women's 
Center -Purpose is to develop 
and utilize the creativity, in 
leiiigence, and creativity of the 
Third World people at the 
university 

Turf Management Club 
UMass Tennis Table Club 
UMass Bicycle Cooperative 
UMass Bowling Club 
UMass Chess Club 
UMam Christians-Purpose 
IS to preach the gosepi of 
Jesus Christ, ar>d teach the bi 
ble as the word of God 
UMass Coin Club 
UMass College Republicans 
Club 

UMass Democrats 
UMass Fisbee Team - 
Purpose IS to compete in and 
enjoy the game of trist>e« 
UMass Rocket Club 
UMass Volleyball 

Association -Purpoee IS to 
pro 

mote the betterment of com- 
petition in volleyball. The 
courses given are not designed 
to teach those at the beginners 
level 

Union Stereo Coop- Located 
on the t>ottom of the Campus 
Center, the coop seeks to seH 
good stereo equipment at low 
prices for students. 
United Christian Founda- 
tion 

University Photo Co-op-- 
Purpose is to provide guidar>ce 
for consumers along with high 
quality photographic rr^atenals. 
Veteran Services 

Organization-Purpose is to 
famialirize veterans of the 
armed forces with scholastic 
life. They foster discussion of 
legislation and ludirinl 



Communist 
Student 



decisions that effect veterans. 
Volunteer Fire Department- 
Purpose is to cooperate with 
UMass and the town of 
Amherst in fire protection and 
first aid consciousness. 
WBLK-Radio Station 
highlighting a Third World 
Perspective. 

Weightlifting Club-Purpose 
is to malie organizational 
arrangements for the 
weightlifting room, while 
providing a forum for those 
who wish to compete in 
Olympic Weightlifting. 
Wildlife Society-The pur- 
pose is to be a liason between 
tfie individual members and 
the parent society. 
WMUA-Radio station for 
UMass located in Marston 
Hall, (see Story page ) 
Women's Media Project- 
Purpose is to provide non- 
sexist, r>o-racist programs in a 
feminist perspective. 
Young Workers Liberation 
League- Purpose is to 
strengthen the unity of youth 
against monopoly for peace, 
democracy, equality! 
socialism, and end 

discrimination. 
Revolutionary 
Youth Brigade 
Revolutionary 
Brigade 
Roister Doisters - A non 
departmental theatre group 
which tries to put on two large 
productions a year, in addition 
to some minor productions 
Room to Move .-- Purpose is 
to provide a student organized 
drop in center with weekly 
meetings, for drug and alcohol 
related information and help. 
Rugby Club Purpose is to 
make available to all the op- 
portunity to play rugby in com 
petition with other colleges 
and clubs 

Russian Circle Purpose is 
to support the students of Rus 
sian. and to further awareness 
of the Russian culture. 
Sailing Club - Purpose is to 
foster the activity of sailing and 
racirtg 

Science Fiction Club They 
provide a place for the discus 
sion of science fiction and 
related topics, and attempt to 
promote an acceptance of 
science fiction as a legitimate 
form of entertainment and 
literature. 

Scuba Club -- Purpose is to 
aid in promoting good sport 
diving, and to gam experience 
in this form of recreation. 
Semper Fidelis Society 
Ski Club - Purpose is to 
enable students, faculty, and 
staff to participate in skiing 
and activities that promote this 
sport. 

Socialist Discussion Group 
- Purpose IS to provide a 



forum tor the discussion and 
dissemination of democratic 
socialist ideas for individuals of 
all political tendencies en 
compassed in the democratic 
socialist philosophy. 
Society of Collegiate Jour- 
nalists 

Society of Women's 
Engineers - Purpose is to 
support the women in the 
school of engineering, and to 
further their careers. 
Special Children's Playlab 
Players - Purpose is to pro- 
vide a friendly and stimulating 
playtinr>e for special needs 
children. It nr^kes use of the 
playlab at Pediatrics in the Nor- 
thampton Nursir>g Home. 
Spectrum -- Purpose is to 
provide the university with a 
balanced presentation of fic- 
tion, poetry, humor, art, 
photography, and non-fiction 
in a magazir>e fornvit. 
Sporting Goods Co-op 
Sports Parachute Club - 
Purpose is to promote the 
competetive sport of skydiving 
within the university. 
Stockbridge Accounting 
Club -- Purpose is to promote 
student participation in ac . 
counting for scholastic 
achievement, to facilitate rela 
tions between faculty, 
students and professior>al ac- 
countants 

University Photo Co-op - 

Purpose IS to provide guidance 
fot consumers along with high 
quaNtv photographic materials 
Veteran Services 

Organization-Purpose is to 
familiarize veterans of the arm 
ed forces with scholastic life 
They foster discussion of 
legislation and judicial deci 
sions that effect veterans 
Volunteer Fire Department 
Purpose IS to cooperate with 
UMass and the town of 
Amherst in fire protection and 
first aid consciousness 
WBLK -Radio Station 
highlighting a Third World 
Persn«rtive 

WMUA- Radio station for 
UMass located in Marston 
Hall (see Story page I 
Women's Media Project -• 
Purpose IS to provide non- 
sexist. non racist irograms in a 
feminist persp>ective. 



Sept. 5, 1978, CoHegifin. L 25 



For more info 
on RSO groups 
consult the 
SGA's STUD EN tI 
TO STUDENT 
publication 
or visit the 



RSO office 



LEARN 



DISCO DANCING 

Get the fever! Disco is just one of our 89 fascinating 
Credit Free Workshops scheduled for Fall 1978. 



Our Workshops let you learn what you want and meet at times con 
venient for working people. If academic credit is not your concern, 
our Workshops are for you' Join us this Fall. 

Workshops in thi.-sp 15 categories begin September 25 



ARTS AND CRAFTS 

COMMUNITIES IN ACTION 

FORtIGN LANGUAGES 

DANCE 

EAST/WEST FOUNDATION 

FOOD 

LANGUAGE AND WRITING 



MATH SKILLS 

MOVEMENT 

MUSIC 

PERSONAL GROWTH 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

SKILLS/CAREER 

TEST PREPARATION 



AND MORE 



H.r,. .irc some of our specific Workshops 
CALLI(5RAPHY UPHOLSTERY. ST Al NED GLASS, GRANTWRI TING, 
MIND PU/7ZLES TEASERS AND GAMES CREATIVE DRAMA 



For (noft; inf omi>ition. • r<it,ilo(| .ind rciiistr.ition, c.ill 
'4131 545 3653 
Oi stop by room 113 H.ishroiick on the UM.iss Amhrrsf campus. 

Th,' Umvfrsitv of Massacluisotts is available to you throiiqh the h«- " 

CREDIT FREE WORKSHOP PROGRAM CVf. 

Division of Continuing Education ■"O ^^f^ 

UMASS/AMHERST LK_J 



i FREE 



■MEDIUM SIZE 



^^i J{«inent6er 



Hi'iirrm .It Canipiis 
Ct»nlrf hood Si'rviccs 

Offer expires IS days 
from first day ol classes 



TEAR OFF HERt 



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01 

3 

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Pick up year free 
bookmark & Coca Cola 
at the Coffee Shop, 
Hatch or Bluewall 
cafeterias between 
Wednesday, Sept. 6 & 
Thurs., Sept. 21, 1978. 




STADIUM 




LIQUORS 

University Drive 

Amherst Shopping Center 
Free delivery ($7.00 min.) 

Oeliv. hours: 6 10 Mon Thurs. 5 10 30 Fri b Sat 



Telephone 2S3 9431 or 2S3 9432 
Open 9 00 am 1100 p.m 



Kegs*Beer*Wines*Cheeses*Soda«lce 
Full assortment of liquor €r wines 



Miller 12oz NR 

6.99 case 


Donnelli Lambrusco 50o/ 

2.88 


Rolling Rock 12oz NR 
5.50 +.73dep. 


Blue Nun 23oz 

3.39 


Falstaff 12o2 cans 

5.50 


Canadian LTD 1.75L 59.2oz 

9.90 


St. Pauli Girl 12oz NR 

11.85 case 


Popov Vodka 1.75L 59.2oz 

8.79 



L-26, Collegian, Sept 5, 1978 



chnrlies 



NEW LUNCH AND 
DINNER MENU 

CREPES 

SPINACH PIE 

OMELETTES 

BURGERS 

SALADS 

DELI SANDWICHES 

And much more 

Low priced Specials Daily 



BREAKFAST SERVED 7 DAYS A WEEK 

weekdays 6:30-1 1 :00 weekends 6:30-2:00! 



X 

[IX 
.VIII 



YlV 



II 

III 

IV. 



ENTERTAINMENT 

BLUE GRASS MUSIC 

ROCK 
ACOUSTIC GUITAR 

JAZZ 



<lOOCLLttjingg 



one 



HAPPY HOUR DAILY 

3-8 P.M. 

Most Drinks .85 

Large 12 oz. Draft Mugs .50 

Free Munchies 



gootitooti&tirtnli 

11 PRAY ST ■ Amherst. Mass. 549-54031 



^mmmm^mmmmmmmmi^mi^ 



B OOttOO PBim POOl 



iOOOO^O#>0#^O#4| 



Bell's Pizza 



Welcome Back Students 




J 



Remember the name cause 
you'll never forget the taste 



Bell's Tastes Tremendous 
No wonder we're No. 1 



Free Delivery on Campus Sun.-Thurs. 






65 University Drive 



549-1311 



253-9051 



i«#O000^<OOi 



i#««#O#O9O0#^ 




I 



Sept 5, 1979, collegian, L27 



'. \ 




Shop Goodyear Now for 
NEW TRACTION! 



Cushion Belt 
Polyglas 

Double fiberglass 
belts ... to help fight 
tread squirm and 
road hazards. 



IjoCblebe^^ 






$ 



31 



878-13 whitewall. plus 
II UF.E.T. and old tire 



Custom Power 
Cushion Polyglas 

Our most popular 
glass-belled tirp . . . 
for great mileage and 
traction. 



Whitewall 
Sizt 


PRICE 


Plut 

F.E T and 

eld tire 


E78-14 


$3S.OO 


$2.19 


F78-14 


$37.00 


$2.34 1 


G78-14 


$31.00 


$2.47 


H78-14 


$41.00 


$2.70 


G78-15 


$40.00 


$2.55 


H78-15 


$42.00 


$2.77 


L78-15 


$40.00 


$3.05 



$ 



37 



A7S-13 whitewall. plus 
II 82 FE T. and old tire 



RAIN CNECK - if we sell 
out of your siie we will 
issue you a ram check, as- 
suring future delivery at 
the advertised price. 



All Weather 78 

Smooth-riding poly* 
ester cord body . . . 
plus a road-gripping 
tread pattern. 



$1975 



B78-13 blacKwall, plus 
$1.72 F.E.T. and old tire 



■Uckwaii 
Sift 



PRICE 



E78-14 



F7814 



G7814 



G78-15 



$26.00 



$27.00 



$29.00 



$30.00 



Plus 

F.C.T and 

old tire 



$2.03 



$2.04 



$2.19 



$2.38 




Lube & Oil 
Change 




$588 



InciudM III) lu 5 n>if)'ts 
Quaker Sl.itf 1(1/ 1<> i 

Call for appoitMmfiiit 



PROTECTS MOVING PARTS - 
ENSURES QUIET OPERATION 

• Compli'lt' oil chiinijc iind ( hiissis In- 
bric'ilidn • Kiisuri's HinoDlh prrlm- 
m«nt:«', mlucrsi Iho chiincfs of vviiir • 
IMruHi' |)honi> for iippointini'nt •